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RECMGMT-L  November 2000

RECMGMT-L November 2000

Subject:

Recordkeeping, the WORD or TERM [ what does it mean? ] LONG maybe even EXTRA LONG, but I trust worthy of interest, value and comment.

From:

L Varendorff <[log in to unmask]>

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Date:

Mon, 13 Nov 2000 10:33:33 +0800

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For the attention of all Records Management and Archive Professionals.


Recordkeeping, what is the meaning of the word or term?

In recent times in the Records and Archive community Nationally and
Internationally this word or term is increasingly in use and I question its
meaning.

If I am in the profession of recordkeeping that would make me as a Records
Manager or Records Officer or a Records Action Officer a record/s keeper?

What is the definition of recordkeeping and record/s keeper?

I have searched the word or term recordkeeping in the Oxford University
Press database with the following result. I have also researched other
sources with similar results.

1. 0 entries found in the Oxford University Press database

On the request on the word or term  record-keeping 20 entries were
discovered.

1. 20 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (1 - 10)

* keeping noun [mass noun] the action of owning, maintaining, or protecting
something: the keeping of dogs | [in combination] careful record-keeping is
needed.
-PHRASES: in someone's keeping in someone's care or custody. in (or out of)
keeping with in (or out of) harmony or conformity with: the cuisine is in
keeping with the hotel's Edwardian character.
* record noun 1 a thing constituting a piece of evidence about the past,
especially an account of an act or occurrence kept in writing or some other
permanent form: identification was made through dental records | a record of
meter readings.
(also court record) Law: an official report of the proceedings and judgement
in a court. Computing: a number of related items of information which are
handled as a unit.
2 the sum of the past achievements or actions of a person or organization; a
person or thing's previous conduct or performance: the safety record at the
airport is first class | the team preserved their unbeaten home record.
short for criminal record.
3 (especially in sport) the best performance or most remarkable event of its
kind that has been officially measured and noted: he held the world record
for over a decade | he managed to beat the record | [as modifier] record
profits.
4 a thin plastic disc carrying recorded sound, especially music, in grooves
on each surface, for reproduction by a record player.
a piece or collection of music reproduced on such a disc or on another
medium, such as compact disc: my favourite record | [as modifier] a record
company. verb [with obj.] 1 set down in writing or some other permanent form
for later reference, especially officially: they were asked to keep a diary
and record everything they ate or drank | [as adj.]
* (recorded) levels of recorded crime.
state or express publicly or officially; make an official record of: the
coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death. (of an instrument or
observer) show or register (a measurement or result): the temperature was
the lowest recorded since 1926. achieve (a certain score or result): they
recorded their first win of the season.
2 convert (sound or a broadcast) into permanent form for later reproduction:
they were recording a guitar recital.
produce (a piece or collection of music or a programme) by such means: they
go into the studio next week to record their debut album.
-PHRASES: for the record so that the true facts are recorded or known: for
the record, I have never been to the flat. a matter of record a thing that
is established as a fact through being officially recorded.
* off the record not made as an official or attributable statement.
* on record 1 (also on the record) used in reference to the making of an
official or public statement: I would like to place on record my sincere
thanks.
2 officially measured and noted: it proved to be one of the warmest
Decembers on record.
3 recorded on tape and reproduced on a record or another sound medium: the
material works far better live than on record. put (or set) the record
straight give the true version of events that have been reported
incorrectly; correct a misapprehension.
-DERIVATIVES recordable adjective.
-ORIGIN Middle English: from Old French record 'remembrance', from recorder
'bring to remembrance', from Latin recordari 'remember', based on cor, cord-
'heart'. The noun was earliest used in law to denote the fact of being
written down as evidence. The verb originally meant quotnarrate orally or in
writingquot, also quotrepeat so as to commit to memoryquot.
* station-keeping noun [mass noun] the maintenance of a ship's proper
position relative to others in a fleet.
* safe keeping noun [mass noun] preservation in a safe place: she'd put her
wedding ring in her purse for safe keeping.
* bee-keeping noun [mass noun] the occupation of owning and breeding bees
for their honey.
-DERIVATIVES bee-keeper noun.
* re-record verb [with obj.] record (sound, especially music) again.
* phonograph record noun N. Amer. fuller form of record (in sense 4).
* court record noun see record (sense 1).
* gramophone record noun fuller form of record (in sense 4).
* gold record noun North American term for gold disc.

Next entries

20 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (11 - 20)

* criminal record noun a list of a person's previous criminal convictions:
the caution wouldn't go on his criminal record.
a history of being convicted for crime: he admits he has a criminal record.
* under-record verb [with obj.] record (a number or amount) as being lower
than it really is.
record (data or information) insufficiently or inadequately: such conditions
had been markedly under-recorded in medical inspection.
* record-breaking adjective surpassing a record or best-ever achievement:
the fair attracted a record-breaking 10,678 visitors.
-DERIVATIVES record-breaker noun.
* record player noun an apparatus for reproducing sound from gramophone
records, comprising a turntable that spins the record at a constant speed
and a stylus that slides along in the groove and picks up the sound,
together with an amplifier and a loudspeaker.
* record type noun [mass noun] Printing: a typeface including characters
which reproduce the contractions or particular letter forms found in
medieval manuscripts.
* track record noun the best recorded performance in a particular athletics
event at a particular track.
the past achievements or performance of a person, organization, or product:
he has an excellent track record as an author.
* police record noun (usu. police records) a dossier kept by the police on
all people convicted of crime.
(a police record) a personal history which includes some conviction for
crime: a well-known character with a police record.
* pre-record verb [with obj.] [often as adj.] (pre-recorded) record (sound
or film) in advance: a pre-recorded talk.
record sound on (a tape) beforehand.
* Public Record Office noun (in the UK) an institution where official
archives are kept for public inspection.
* court of record noun a court whose proceedings are recorded and available
as evidence of fact.

On searching for the word recordkeeper, I get zero results. From the Oxford
University Press the following results are achieved.

1. 0 entries found in the Oxford University Press database

On searching for the word record-keeper. From the Oxford University Press
the following results are achieved.

1. 19 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (1 - 10)
* keeper noun 1 a person who manages or looks after something or someone, in
particular:
Brit. a custodian of a museum or gallery collection. short for goalkeeper or
wicketkeeper. an animal attendant employed in a zoo. Compare with zookeeper.
short for gamekeeper. a person who is regarded as being in charge of someone
else: I would not stop him-I'm his wife, not his keeper.
2 [with adj.] a food or drink that remains in a specified condition if
stored: hazelnuts are good keepers.
3 informal: a thing worth keeping: they were deciding which measurements are
questionable and which are keepers.
N. Amer. a fish large enough to be kept when caught.
4 an object which keeps another in place, or protects something more fragile
or valuable, in particular:
a plain ring to preserve a hole in a pierced ear lobe; a sleeper. a ring
worn to keep a more valuable one on the finger. a bar of soft iron placed
across the poles of a horseshoe magnet to maintain its strength.
5 American Football: a play in which the quarterback receives the ball from
the centre and runs with it.
-DERIVATIVES keepership noun.
* lock-keeper noun a person who is employed to attend and maintain a lock on
a river or canal.
* saloon keeper noun N. Amer. a person who runs a bar; a bartender.
* record noun 1 a thing constituting a piece of evidence about the past,
especially an account of an act or occurrence kept in writing or some other
permanent form: identification was made through dental records | a record of
meter readings.
(also court record) Law: an official report of the proceedings and judgement
in a court. Computing: a number of related items of information which are
handled as a unit.
2 the sum of the past achievements or actions of a person or organization; a
person or thing's previous conduct or performance: the safety record at the
airport is first class | the team preserved their unbeaten home record.
short for criminal record.
3 (especially in sport) the best performance or most remarkable event of its
kind that has been officially measured and noted: he held the world record
for over a decade | he managed to beat the record | [as modifier] record
profits.
4 a thin plastic disc carrying recorded sound, especially music, in grooves
on each surface, for reproduction by a record player.
a piece or collection of music reproduced on such a disc or on another
medium, such as compact disc: my favourite record | [as modifier] a record
company. verb [with obj.] 1 set down in writing or some other permanent form
for later reference, especially officially: they were asked to keep a diary
and record everything they ate or drank | [as adj.] (recorded) levels of
recorded crime.
state or express publicly or officially; make an official record of: the
coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death. (of an instrument or
observer) show or register (a measurement or result): the temperature was
the lowest recorded since 1926. achieve (a certain score or result): they
recorded their first win of the season.
2 convert (sound or a broadcast) into permanent form for later reproduction:
they were recording a guitar recital.
produce (a piece or collection of music or a programme) by such means: they
go into the studio next week to record their debut album.
-PHRASES: for the record so that the true facts are recorded or known: for
the record, I have never been to the flat. a matter of record a thing that
is established as a fact through being officially recorded. off the record
not made as an official or attributable statement. on record 1 (also on the
record) used in reference to the making of an official or public statement:
I would like to place on record my sincere thanks.
2 officially measured and noted: it proved to be one of the warmest
Decembers on record.
3 recorded on tape and reproduced on a record or another sound medium: the
material works far better live than on record. put (or set) the record
straight give the true version of events that have been reported
incorrectly; correct a misapprehension.
-DERIVATIVES recordable adjective.
-ORIGIN Middle English: from Old French record 'remembrance', from recorder
'bring to remembrance', from Latin recordari 'remember', based on cor, cord-
'heart'. The noun was earliest used in law to denote the fact of being
written down as evidence. The verb originally meant quotnarrate orally or in
writingquot, also quotrepeat so as to commit to memoryquot.
* re-record verb [with obj.] record (sound, especially music) again.
* criminal record noun a list of a person's previous criminal convictions:
the caution wouldn't go on his criminal record.
a history of being convicted for crime: he admits he has a criminal record.
* phonograph record noun N. Amer. fuller form of record (in sense 4).
* police record noun (usu. police records) a dossier kept by the police on
all people convicted of crime.
(a police record) a personal history which includes some conviction for
crime: a well-known character with a police record.
* gramophone record noun fuller form of record (in sense 4).
* gold record noun North American term for gold disc.

Next entries

19 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (11 - 19)

* court record noun see record (sense 1).
* pre-record verb [with obj.] [often as adj.] (pre-recorded) record (sound
or film) in advance: a pre-recorded talk.
record sound on (a tape) beforehand.
* record-breaking adjective surpassing a record or best-ever achievement:
the fair attracted a record-breaking 10,678 visitors.
-DERIVATIVES record-breaker noun.
* record player noun an apparatus for reproducing sound from gramophone
records, comprising a turntable that spins the record at a constant speed
and a stylus that slides along in the groove and picks up the sound,
together with an amplifier and a loudspeaker.
* record type noun [mass noun] Printing: a typeface including characters
which reproduce the contractions or particular letter forms found in
medieval manuscripts.
* under-record verb [with obj.] record (a number or amount) as being lower
than it really is.
record (data or information) insufficiently or inadequately: such conditions
had been markedly under-recorded in medical inspection.
* track record noun the best recorded performance in a particular athletics
event at a particular track.
the past achievements or performance of a person, organization, or product:
he has an excellent track record as an author.
* Public Record Office noun (in the UK) an institution where official
archives are kept for public inspection.
* court of record noun a court whose proceedings are recorded and available
as evidence of fact.

On searching for the word bookkeeping: From the Oxford University Press the
following results are achieved

1. 1 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (1)

* bookkeeping noun [mass noun] the activity or occupation of keeping records
of the financial affairs of a business.
-DERIVATIVES bookkeeper noun.

On searching for the word record: From the Oxford University Press the
following results are achieved

1. 16 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (1 - 10)

* record noun 1 a thing constituting a piece of evidence about the past,
especially an account of an act or occurrence kept in writing or some other
permanent form: identification was made through dental records | a record of
meter readings.
(also court record) Law: an official report of the proceedings and judgement
in a court. Computing: a number of related items of information which are
handled as a unit.
2 the sum of the past achievements or actions of a person or organization; a
person or thing's previous conduct or performance: the safety record at the
airport is first class | the team preserved their unbeaten home record.
short for criminal record.
3 (especially in sport) the best performance or most remarkable event of its
kind that has been officially measured and noted: he held the world record
for over a decade | he managed to beat the record | [as modifier] record
profits.
4 a thin plastic disc carrying recorded sound, especially music, in grooves
on each surface, for reproduction by a record player.
a piece or collection of music reproduced on such a disc or on another
medium, such as compact disc: my favourite record | [as modifier] a record
company. verb [with obj.] 1 set down in writing or some other permanent form
for later reference, especially officially: they were asked to keep a diary
and record everything they ate or drank | [as adj.] (recorded) levels of
recorded crime.
state or express publicly or officially; make an official record of: the
coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death. (of an instrument or
observer) show or register (a measurement or result): the temperature was
the lowest recorded since 1926. achieve (a certain score or result): they
recorded their first win of the season.
2 convert (sound or a broadcast) into permanent form for later reproduction:
they were recording a guitar recital.
produce (a piece or collection of music or a programme) by such means: they
go into the studio next week to record their debut album.
-PHRASES: for the record so that the true facts are recorded or known: for
the record, I have never been to the flat. a matter of record a thing that
is established as a fact through being officially recorded. off the record
not made as an official or attributable statement. on record 1 (also on the
record) used in reference to the making of an official or public statement:
I would like to place on record my sincere thanks.
2 officially measured and noted: it proved to be one of the warmest
Decembers on record.
3 recorded on tape and reproduced on a record or another sound medium: the
material works far better live than on record. put (or set) the record
straight give the true version of events that have been reported
incorrectly; correct a misapprehension.
-DERIVATIVES recordable adjective.
-ORIGIN Middle English: from Old French record 'remembrance', from recorder
'bring to remembrance', from Latin recordari 'remember', based on cor, cord-
'heart'. The noun was earliest used in law to denote the fact of being
written down as evidence. The verb originally meant quotnarrate orally or in
writingquot, also quotrepeat so as to commit to memoryquot.
* re-record verb [with obj.] record (sound, especially music) again.
* gold record noun North American term for gold disc.
* criminal record noun a list of a person's previous criminal convictions:
the caution wouldn't go on his criminal record.
a history of being convicted for crime: he admits he has a criminal record.
* phonograph record noun N. Amer. fuller form of record (in sense 4).
* court record noun see record (sense 1).
* gramophone record noun fuller form of record (in sense 4).
* track record noun the best recorded performance in a particular athletics
event at a particular track.
the past achievements or performance of a person, organization, or product:
he has an excellent track record as an author.
* under-record verb [with obj.] record (a number or amount) as being lower
than it really is.
record (data or information) insufficiently or inadequately: such conditions
had been markedly under-recorded in medical inspection.
* police record noun (usu. police records) a dossier kept by the police on
all people convicted of crime.
(a police record) a personal history which includes some conviction for
crime: a well-known character with a police record.

Next entries[PARA][PARA]16 entries found in the Oxford University Press
database (11 - 16) [PARA]* record-breaking adjective surpassing a record or
best-ever achievement: the fair attracted a record-breaking 10,678 visitors.
[NL]-DERIVATIVES record-breaker noun. [PARA]* record player noun an
apparatus for reproducing sound from gramophone records, comprising a
turntable that spins the record at a constant speed and a stylus that slides
along in the groove and picks up the sound, together with an amplifier and a
loudspeaker. [PARA]* record type noun [mass noun] Printing: a typeface
including characters which reproduce the contractions or particular letter
forms found in medieval manuscripts. [PARA]* pre-record verb [with obj.]
[often as adj.] (pre-recorded) record (sound or film) in advance: a
pre-recorded talk.[NL]record sound on (a tape) beforehand. [PARA]* Public
Record Office noun (in the UK) an institution where official archives are
kept for public inspection. [PARA]* court of record noun a court whose
proceedings are recorded and available as evidence of fact. [PARA]

On searching for the word management: From the Oxford University Press the
following results are achieved

8 entries found in the Oxford University Press database (1 - 8)
* management noun [mass noun]1 the process of dealing with or controlling
things or people: the management of the British economy.
the responsibility for and control of a company or similar organization: a
successful career in management. [treated as sing. or pl.] the people in
charge of running a company or organization, regarded collectively:
management were extremely cooperative. Medicine: amp Psychiatry: the
treatment or control of diseases, injuries, or disorders, or the care of
patients who suffer them: long-term management of patients with cirrhosis.
2 archaic: trickery; deceit: if there has been any management in the
business, it has been concealed from me.
* self-management noun [mass noun] management of or by oneself; the taking
of responsibility for one's own behaviour and well-being.
the distribution of political control to individual regions of a state,
especially as a form of socialism practised by its own members. management
of an organization.
-DERIVATIVES self-managing adjective.
* management accounting noun [mass noun] the provision of financial data and
advice to a company for use in the organization and development of its
business.
-DERIVATIVES management accountant noun.
* management company noun a company which is set up to manage a group of
properties, a unit trust, an investment fund, etc.
* scientific management noun [mass noun] management of a business, industry,
or economy, according to principles of efficiency derived from experiments
in methods of work and production, especially from time-and-motion studies.
* crisis management noun [mass noun] the practice of taking managerial
action only when a crisis has developed.
* Total Quality Management noun [mass noun] a system of management based on
the principle that every member of staff must be committed to maintaining
high standards of work in every aspect of a company's operations.
* database management system (abbrev.: DBMS) noun Computing: software that
handles the storage, retrieval, and updating of data in a computer system.



 If I am a recordkeeper because the things that I do are recordkeeping I do
not feel that this is a truism of my role in life as a Records Manager.

If I am a Records Manager or a Records Officer my role is to manage records
not specifically to keep records.

Archivists may keep records and thus they are carrying out recordkeeping
activities and are record/s keepers.


In a presentation I gave on behalf or the Records Management Association of
Australia "RMAA", Western Australian Branch in 1995 to the Western
Australian Commission on Government "COG" the following facts were supplied:
"In guidelines published by the Public Records Office titled 1 "Records
Disposal A Handbook for Government Agencies" it states  that only  3% to 8%
of all records are likely  to be of permanent value and therefore  become
archives."

In my role as a Records Manager or a Records Officer I actually do keep
records, but only as a secondary, though critically important activity with
those 3% - 8% as identified in the above guidelines. The figure may be one
on which to argue, but irrespective if it is 3% - 8% or 4% - 7% or 5% - 9%
my predominant role is to MANAGE not KEEP records.

If the above percentage ratios are a truism then as a Records Manager I
manage 100% of the records under my jurisdiction and I keep 3% - 8% of those
records as archives then it should be another truism that I destroy  92% -
97% of these same managed records. Is it then that I am a recordsdestroyer
and the process I carry out is recordsdestructing.

If the logic that calls the process of what I do as a Records Manager is
Recordkeeping and I only do this for 3% to 8% of my records management
responsibilities, it should also be true that the task I am performing is
actually Recordsdestroying.

Neither of these situations is the truth in regard to the task I am
performing. I am a Records Manager and the task that I perform is to manage
Records or  Record/s Systems.

I do not doubt that Archivists feel that they keep records and as such are
correct in using the term recordkeeping or recordkeeper. I also would
believe that they in addition to keeping the records as archives they also
manage the records as archives.

In the new ISO standard ISO/DIS 15489 for Records Management the word or
term recordkeeping or records keeper is a non word and has been eliminated
from the document. The Technical Report "TR" which supports the ISO/DIS
15489 is also barren of the word or term recordkeeping or record keeping or
at least it will be when the document runs the process of construction and
refining.

In the Australian Standard AS4390 the term recordkeeping is liberally used
and based on my above expressed views I believe it should not be so. The
AS4390 will require revision in light of the ISO/DIS 15489 and the TR
document. I would suggest that we follow international protocol in the
revision of this standard in following the ISO decision to eliminate the
word or term recordkeeping from the standard.

The ISO standard ISO/DIS 15489 for Records Management is just that a
standard for Records Management and expressly advise that it is not a
standard for Archives. So much for the Record Continuum.

Now, there is another subject, word or term that I may care to address in a
later musing. That is if I survive the aftermath of this heresy.

Regards,
Laurie

Mr Daniel Lawrance [Laurie] Varendorff, ARMA

Consultant/Trainer/Tutor/Presenter: Information and Records Management
Tutor: Edith Cowan University - Subject: Public RecordKeeping

The Varendorff Consultancy
ABN: 77 836 801 165
GST: 77 836 801 165
27 Ronneby Rd
Lesmurdie
Western Australia 6076
AUSTRALIA

President: Western Australian Branch, Records Management Association of
Australia "RMAA"
Federal Director: Records Management Association of Australia "RMAA"
Chair: Technology and Industry Standards Committee - RMAA, WA Branch
Chair: WA State Records Bill 1999 Committee - RMAA, WA Branch

PHONE :   +61 8 9291 6925
FAX :           +61 8 9291 9141
MOBILE :   +61 0417 094 147
EMAIL :    [log in to unmask]

********************************
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July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 5
June 2016, Week 4
June 2016, Week 3
June 2016, Week 2
June 2016, Week 1
May 2016, Week 5
May 2016, Week 4
May 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 2
May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
April 2016, Week 4
April 2016, Week 3
April 2016, Week 2
April 2016, Week 1
March 2016, Week 5
March 2016, Week 4
March 2016, Week 3
March 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 1
February 2016, Week 5
February 2016, Week 4
February 2016, Week 3
February 2016, Week 2
February 2016, Week 1
January 2016, Week 5
January 2016, Week 4
January 2016, Week 3
January 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
December 2015, Week 4
December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 2
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 4
November 2015, Week 3
November 2015, Week 2
November 2015, Week 1
October 2015, Week 5
October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
October 2015, Week 1
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 5
August 2015, Week 4
August 2015, Week 3
August 2015, Week 2
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 5
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 5
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 5
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
May 2015, Week 2
May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 5
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 3
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 5
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 3
February 2015, Week 2
February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 5
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
January 2015, Week 2
January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
December 2014, Week 2
December 2014, Week 1
November 2014, Week 5
November 2014, Week 4
November 2014, Week 3
November 2014, Week 2
November 2014, Week 1
October 2014, Week 5
October 2014, Week 4
October 2014, Week 3
October 2014, Week 2
October 2014, Week 1
September 2014, Week 5
September 2014, Week 4
September 2014, Week 3
September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
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August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
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July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 5
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 4
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 5
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 5
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
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October 2004, Week 3
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