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RECMGMT-L  January 2001

RECMGMT-L January 2001

Subject:

RAIN 01/25: Digitizing Newspapers, White House and E-sigs

From:

Peter Kurilecz <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Records Management Program <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 26 Jan 2001 06:32:29 EST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (300 lines)

PRNewswire 01/12/01
Bell & Howell announces launch of ProQuest Historical Newspapers ™ Project
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/010112/dc_bell_ho.html

WASHINGTON, Jan. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Bell & Howell's (NYSE: BHW - news)
Information and Learning unit announced a new millennium product launch today
from the Midwinter meeting of the American Library Association that will
bring complete runs of newspapers to the Web via the ProQuest® online
information service.



PRNewswire 01/12/01
Bell & Howell Signs Landmark Agreement with The New York Times Company to
Digitize Historical Backfiles of The New York Times
http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/010112/ny_the_new.html

NEW YORK & ANN ARBOR, Mich.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 12, 2001-- Bell & Howell's
(NYSE: BHW - news) Information and Learning unit and The New York Times
Company (NYSE: NYT - news) announced today an agreement that will bring The
New York Times newspaper's backfile dating back to its first issue in 1851 to
the Web through the ProQuest® online information service. This landmark
agreement allows for Bell & Howell to digitize the backfile of the nation's
newspaper of record - some 3,500,000 pages in total - and to distribute the
resulting database to educational institutions and libraries around the
world.



PRNewswire 01/15/01
The Wall Street Journal Backfiles to Be Digitized and Distributed on the Web
by Bell & Howell
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Bell & Howell's (NYSE: BHW - news)
Information and Learning unit and Dow Jones & Company announced an agreement
today from the floor of the Midwinter meeting of the American Library
Association that will bring the backfile of The Wall Street Journal to the
Web as part of the ProQuest Historical Newspapers(TM) project of Bell &
Howell's Digital Vault Initiative. This landmark agreement allows for Bell &
Howell to digitize the backfile of this critical business news source -- some
1,700,000 pages in total -- and to make full page images of the original
print publication available to educational institutions and libraries around
the world.



BUSINESS WIRE 01/08/01
Film-based Imaging Association (FbIA) Helps Convince Archivist of the United
States to Continue Preserving Census Information on Film not Digital
http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/010108/md_aiim.html

SILVER SPRING, Md.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 8, 2001-- The Film-based Imaging
Association (FbIA), an advocate for the needs and concerns of companies
providing microfilm-based solutions, today announced that through the
association and other professional organizations lobbying efforts, the
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has elected to continue
utilizing microfilm rather than digital imaging to preserve the 2000 Census.



New York Times 01/25/01
Archiving Digital Records From the White House
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/25/technology/25WHIT.html

by Jennifer Lee
The Oval Office has been redecorated. The file cabinets have been cleared.
New carpets have been installed. And now, the hard drives have been erased.
The White House transition is a 200-year-old routine, but this was the first
time it involved a large-scale electronic component.
On Saturday morning, before George W. Bush was sworn in as the nation's 43rd
president, 177 staff computers were removed from the White House executive
offices and prepared for an orderly succession.



Miami Herald 01/25/01
Town settles records lawsuit for more than $18,000
http://www.herald.com/content/today/news/dade/beaches/digdocs/102538.htm

by Walter Pacheco
A missing records case between a Golden Beach resident and the town is
settled, and it will cost the town more than $18,000.
``The settlement came as a result of a demand I made to the town,'' said
Carlos Lidsky, who sued the town in June 1999 because the town failed to
provide him with voluminous amount of records he requested. ``They chose to
accept it (the settlement) and resolve the problem.''



New York Times 01/25/01
Mining the 'Deep Web' With Specialized Drills
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/25/technology/25SEAR.html

by Lisa Guernsey
TWO weeks ago, online newspapers and magazines were buzzing with news about
Linda Chavez, President Bush's first choice for labor secretary.
But from the results coming up in most popular search engines, you would
never have known it. Instead of retrieving articles about an illegal
immigrant who had lived in Ms. Chavez's home, a Google search on "chavez" led
to several encyclopedia entries on Cesar Chavez, the American labor leader
and advocate of farmworkers' rights.


(for the following story you must read all the way to the end for the role of
records)

The Muskegon Chronicle 01/24/01 (Thanks to Jacqueline Haun for the tip)
Probe: Doc was using patients' painkillers
http://mu.mlive.com/news/index.ssf?/news/stories/20010124mhendri568.frm

by Michael G. Walsh
A senior citizen with a broken arm, a migraine sufferer and other people in
pain were denied relief at a Muskegon hospital because their emergency room
physician stole pain-killing drugs for his own use, a state police
investigation has found.
Dr. Jeffrey Phillip Hendricks, 31, who admitted stealing the drugs earmarked
for his patients and injecting himself while on the job, was charged Tuesday
with two counts of obtaining a controlled substance by fraud. If convicted as
charged, he faces up to four years in prison.




Augusta Chronicle 01/25/01
Raid targets training company
http://augustachronicle.com/stories/012501/met_151-3728.000.shtml

by Preston Sparks
Federal agents and sheriff's deputies raided a Columbia County business and
residence Wednesday morning with a federal search warrant, collecting
documents concerning the company, which has promoted itself as a medical
billing trainer.
The raids - at Provident Business Solutions, 4210 2-C Columbia Road in
Martinez, and the business owners' Windmill Parkway home in Evans - were
conducted just before 10 a.m. The operation included more than a dozen FBI
agents and Columbia County sheriff's investigators and resulted from a
nine-week federal investigation, said Columbia County sheriff's Capt. Steve
Morris.



St. Louis Post-Dispatch 01/24/01
ADM executive arrested for embezzlement
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/AEAC62E77D8FC8E18625

69DE00703402?OpenDocument

Associated Press
DECATUR, Ill. (AP) -- A marketing manager was charged Wednesday with
embezzling more than $118,000 from the Archer Daniels Midland Co. over the
past 15 months.
Jerry D. Jones, 43, of Decatur, allegedly created a phony company and
submitted fake invoices, which ADM paid and Jones deposited in his personal
bank account.



The Post and Courier 01/25/01
SLED probing disappearance of cell phone billing records
http://www.charleston.net/pub/news/dorchester/sled0125.htm

by Edward C. Fennell
RIDGEVILLE - The State Law Enforcement Division is investigating the
disappearance of cellular phone billing records that had been sought by
investigators for the S.C. Ethics Commission.
The records were discovered missing Jan. 8, the day an Ethics Commission
investigator was to pick them up at Town Hall. The commission won't confirm
or deny it is conducting a probe.



Arkansas Democrat Gazette 01/25/01
White House Web site nearly empty
http://www.ardemgaz.com/week/Thu/ark/A1xwebsite25.html

by Jeff Porter
For President Bush, the information superhighway is under construction. Be
prepared for delays.
The Bush administration faces the task of rebuilding the White House Web
site; when Bill Clinton left office Saturday, his online documents left, too.
As of midafternoon Wednesday, the home page of the site www.whitehouse.gov
included only nine lines of text and a small collection of links leading to a
few other pages. A link, often appearing as underlined text, transports a Web
surfer to another page.



Russia Today 01/25/01
Berlin Mayor to Hand Back Stolen Archives in Moscow Ceremony
http://www.russiatoday.com/news.php3?id=268078

Agence France Presse
MOSCOW, Jan 25, 2001 -- (Agence France Presse) Berlin mayor Eberhard Diepgen
was due to fly to Russia on Thursday to hand over more than 200 priceless
archive documents stolen from Saint Petersburg, the German embassy in Moscow
said.



Bergen Record 01/24/01
A Civil War relic auction for the ages
http://www.bergen.com/region/auct24200101248.htm

by Richard Pyle
Associated Press
NEW YORK -- As if he had walked across still-smoldering battlefields to
gather the debris of conflict, John M. Bracken spent 40 years assembling a
vast, eclectic collection of Civil War artifacts -- weapons, uniforms,
documents, flags, vintage photographs, even band instruments.
Now, he's ready to give it all up -- for a price.



Computer User.com January 2001
E-Sign me up
http://currents.net/articles/2001,6,30,1,0101,01.html

by Phil Davies
When Uncle Sam speaks, people listen. Throughout the 20th century, federal
legislation has given an extra nudge to events and trends already underway,
accelerating social and economic development. The Federal Aid Highway Act of
1956; The Clean Water Act in 1972; the 1996 Telecommunications Act; often,
the full effects of these laws--suburban sprawl, pleasure cruising on the
Chicago River, the AOL-Time Warner merger--only become apparent years or
decades after passage.
Such will be the case with the Electronic Signatures in Global and National
Commerce Act, effective since last October. What E-Sign says is less
important that what it signifies for the future of e-business.



Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 01/24/01
Veteran helps make memories accessible
http://www.jsonline.com/news/wauk/jan01/walkcol25012401a.asp

Delafield - Arlo F. Bartsch said he wants to leave a big footprint behind.
The 79-year-old wartime bomber pilot who made his civilian way in part as the
founder of computer software and database companies, has an ambitious idea.
He wants to compile military service records and recollections of U.S.
veterans on a handy CD so the rest of us can easily find them without trips
to the National Archives or letters to the bureaucracies of record
repositories.
Wouldn't that be something?



Daily Californian 01/24/01
OceanStore leads wave of new data-storing technology
http://news.excite.com/news/uw/010124/tech-150

by Diwata Fonte
(U-WIRE) BERKELEY, Calif. -- As California residents continue to worry about
rolling blackouts, a University of California-Berkeley professor has found a
way to ensure computerized records will not be eliminated by power outages or
natural disasters.
John Kubiatowicz, a UC Berkeley computer science professor, has created a
program called OceanStore, which may eliminate the worries of computer users.
The program, a "world-spanning hard disk that everyone can connect to," may
prevent information from being lost in the event of a blackout.



Commerce Times 01/25/01
Shaky start for e-signatures
http://www.ecommercetimes.com/perl/story/6977.html

by Paul A. Greenberg
Last summer, when now former U.S. President Bill Clinton signed the
Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act (E-SIGN Act), it
seemed we were about to scale the next digital mountain.
Conceivably, from that point on, Internet users would be able to enter into
contracts and seal the deal electronically. No exchanges of pleasantries, no
handshakes and no hassles.
Despite the great fanfare that accompanied the passage of the legislation,
not much has been heard about e-signatures in a while. Why? Simply because
the legislation had some significant glitches that make it somewhat less than
fraud-and-foolproof.



Salt Lake Tribune 01/23/01
Leavitt's proposal to add historian post is … history
http://www.sltrib.com/01232001/utah/64941.htm

by Dan Harrie
Gov. Mike Leavitt has dropped his proposal to add an official historian to
his staff.
Leavitt, in his budget recommendations released in December, had asked for
$56,000 annually to hire a full-time historian for the next four years.
The duties of the proposed position never were well-defined. A spokeswoman
said the work mainly would involve preserving and cataloging important
documents, but there could be special projects such as histories of the
Olympic bid scandal or the 1995 Growth Summit.





Peter A. Kurilecz CRM, CA
Richmond, Va
[log in to unmask]

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