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Subject:

Re: LASSI (and Tutor Training)

From:

Jelaine McCamish <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 5 Apr 2001 08:57:44 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (671 lines)

I doubt there's a glitch.

About two 1/2 years ago, we had the Meyers-Briggs done for our department.
I'm the Idealist (INFJ - mentor) and the rest are/were Guardians.

In our case, we had one INFJ leaning toward P, one ENTJ, one ISFJ, and one
ESFJ. (Yes, I remember.)  And whew! What a combination.  The "N" part had
trouble with the "S" part, and the "F" part had trouble with the "T" part.
There were some minor problems with the "I" versus "E", but not that much.

It did help us to try to understand each other better.  It lead to
discussions, both private and group.  I think it's extremely important for
departments.  But, it will only work if the people in the department use it
to try to overcome, work with/through, or laugh - as you said - about their
differences.

My thanks to my former director Sally Lake (member of the listserv) for
giving us the insight.

Jelaine McCamish
Instructional Specialist

>From: "Evans, Linda" <[log in to unmask]>
>Reply-To: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
><[log in to unmask]>
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: LASSI (and Tutor Training)
>Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 10:25:40 -0400
>
>One of our instructors recently encouraged us to try out the online version
>of the Keirsey and we've had fun with it as a staff.  We also encouraged
>our
>math tutors to take it.  However, the only two types that have resulted
>from
>the online version are Idealists (me and one of our tutors) and Guardians
>(the rest of my staff!).  I know that there are two other types.  Is there
>a
>glitch in the online version or am I truly surrounded by Guardians?!!
>Linda
>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Jeanne Higbee [SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
> > Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2001 3:21 PM
> > To:   [log in to unmask]
> > Subject:      Re: LASSI (and Tutor Training)
> >
> > --------------AC35000A772CF6F658B386D7
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> >
> > Lise (sorry I mispelled your name last time) et al.,
> >
> > Some textbooks, including Gardner & Jewler's Your College Experience,
> > include
> > instruments based on Junge's typology. Another option is the Keirsey
> > Temperament
> > Sorter <www.keirsey.com>. At the University of Georgia (UGA) we had the
> > Keirsey
> > available in another format in our learning center. After students
> > completed it,
> > they discussed it with one of the counselors working in the learning
> > center prior
> > to the discussion in our elective self-awareness classes offered by
>UGA's
> > Division
> > of Academic Assistance. In my early years at UGA (before some of the
> > sophisticated
> > computer scoring we have now) we administered the MBTI in class and then
> > hand
> > scored it, but it became too expensive and too time consuming,
>especially
> > when we
> > began branching out from our traditional required Developmental Studies
> > program to
> > a range of courses and services available to all students at the
> > institution.
> >
> > I need to note here that the Keirsey is not as comprehensive as the
>MBTI.
> > The
> > first Q I would ask students after their initial individual
>interpretation
> > was
> > whether they thought it sounded like them. Because of the way some of
>the
> > Qs are
> > worded in the Keirsey, it really seems to ask how they would like to be
> > rather
> > than how they behave/think.(As Gail mentioned, preferences)  In my
> > experience, it
> > was on J/P that students most often disagreed with their results, many
> > coming out
> > as J but thinking that P sounded more like them.
> >
> > At the University of Minnesota General College (GC), one of the courses
>I
> > teach is
> > the Psychology of Personal Adjustment. Over the course of the semester,
> > students
> > have to write four papers applying the theoretical information in the
>text
> > to
> > their own development. I always give a choice of essay topics. One
>series
> > of
> > choices, and most students choose one of these, is to take the Keirsey
> > on-line and
> > then relate the results to learning styles, interpersonal relationships
> > (including
> > roommates but family relationships are also a choice), or career
> > exploration.
> > Students enjoy it, but also are directed not to overgeneralize. One of
>my
> > students
> > referred to the Keirsey as "the horoscope of personality."
> >
> > I try not to make guesses about types, because I know that no one
>guesses
> > mine
> > correctly. But it has been a standing joke between me and two of my
> > frequent
> > co-authors that they are both Js and I am obviously a P. Two of my new
> > colleagues
> > who are also INFPs pegged me correctly right away. (Does it take one to
> > know one?)
> >
> > Anyway, I find it useful to consider types in some situations; it can
>help
> > explain
> > things sometimes. (When I first became acquainted with the MBTI more
>than
> > 20 years
> > ago, it was part of a student affairs staff dev't workshop, and we
> > realized that
> > all the counselors on that particular staff were Fs and Ps, and all the
> > student
> > activity folks were Ts and Js. It helped us overcome some conflicts we
> > were
> > having--we could start laughing about ourselves and our responses to one
> > another!)
> > But I also consider it important to not go too far with it.
> >
> > I also want to agree with Karen Smith that bumps along the way can be a
> > good
> > thing. Aren't some of our returning students the most highly motivated,
> > for
> > exmple? My initial reaction was not to the thought that being on
>probation
> > said
> > something about the individual, but that we should take care to
> > individualize the
> > use of test results of this nature.
> >
> > Now if you really want to get me started, let's talk about the SAT! Not
> > really, I
> > need to get off-line and get back to what I am supposed to be doing
>today!
> >
> > Jeanne Higbee
> >
> > Lise Hedstrom wrote:
> >
> > > How do you know your students' MBTI profiles or "scores"--do you have
> > them
> > > all take the MBTI, or are you able to discern their
> > > personality types on sight, Jeanne?  We're working on MBTI as an
>office
> > > group; I've not used it with tutors (although some have talked about
>it)
> > or
> > > in the classroom.  Lise
> > >
> > > At 02:07 PM 04/04/2001 -0400, you wrote:
> > > >Lisa,
> > > >
> > > >Me, too, and perhaps hence the response. However, I was also thinking
> > about
> > > >many of my students who are Ps, and how their "go with the flow"
>nature
> > can
> > > >energize and stimulate, how they can serve as catalysts in the
> > classroom. My
> > > >most memorable students come in many sizes, shapes, and personality
> > types.
> > > >
> > > >I truly am an editor, and most who know me superficially would never
> > guess
> > > >that I am an INFP (especially the I!), but one of the standard grids
>on
> > > >personality types states that INFPs tend to take on too much and then
> > somehow
> > > >get it all done. Again a generalization, but at least a more positive
> > on than
> > > >that of the probationary student!
> > > >
> > > >Jeanne Higbee
> > > >
> > > >Lise Hedstrom wrote:
> > > >
> > > >> I am a classical ("the editor") INFP, and I was never, ever on
> > academic
> > > >> probation.
> > > >>
> > > >> At 01:41 PM 04/04/2001 -0400, you wrote:
> > > >> >Hi, Everyone!
> > > >> >
> > > >> >This is one of those times when I really do not need to get pulled
> > into
> > > >> >one of these discussions (so much to do, so little time!), so I
>will
> > keep
> > > >> >my response brief, but I feel the need to respond.
> > > >> >
> > > >> >In some states only licensed psychologists are able to administer
> > the
> > > >> >MBTI these days. The reason is the concern about broad
> > generalizations
> > > >> >based on results. Yes, for some students P could just as easily
> > represent
> > > >> >"procrastinating" as "perceiving," but it is important that any
> > > >> >interpretation of MBTI results be individualized.
> > > >> >
> > > >> >It might be very interesting to learn how many of the subscribers
>to
> > > >> >LRNASST are INFPs and ENFPs. And how many of you were ever on
> > academic
> > > >> >probation?
> > > >> >
> > > >> >I am not meaning to be critical, just to point out that it is
> > important
> > > >> >to take care when generalizing any test developed for individual
> > > >> >assessment to groups of people.
> > > >> >
> > > >> >Jeanne Higbee
> > > >> >
> > > >> >"Schulz, Karyn" wrote:
> > > >> >
> > > >> >> Julie,
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> This is very interesting info.  Thanks for sharing!
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> Karyn Schulz
> > > >> >> CCBC Essex
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> -----Original Message-----
> > > >> >> From: Julie Jackson-Coe [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> > > >> >> Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2001 1:34 PM
> > > >> >> To: [log in to unmask]
> > > >> >> Subject: LASSI (and Tutor Training)
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> Ameenah,
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> I've just returned from the Annual NYCLSA (New York College
> > Learning
> > > >> >> Skills Association) Conference and  went to a great session
> > presented
> > > >> >> by Nancy Bailey and Michael Rogoff from Keuka College called
> > > >> >> "Identifying and Helping High Risk Students in the Academic
> > Trasition
> > > >> >> to College."  They use the Meyers-Brigg type Indicator, and
>found
> > > >> >> that first-year students exhibiting N and P preferences were
> > > >> >> "especially likely to report greater study difficulties, poorer
> > GPA's
> > > >> >> and lower scholastic self-perception" (from their presentation
> > > >> >> summary).   If  I took accurate notes, they said that of the
> > freshmen
> > > >> >> on probation, "NP's" were twice as likely to be on probation!
> > They
> > > >> >> said that the most important "strategy" they could use with
>these
> > > >> >> types was to teach them to preview their textbooks -- use the
> > > >> >> learning objectives and summaries in each chapter before they
> > started
> > > >> >> to read the chapter.
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> I have stressed this strategy before in tutor training sessions,
> > but
> > > >> >> again, after hearing the statistics presented at this
> > > >> >> session, I now mention it at EVERY training session (we run
>group
> > > >> >> sessions on different topics about every other week).
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> As for Learning Style and then applying certain  learning
> > strategies,
> > > >> >> I think this is all part of the same concept.  In their
> > presentation,
> > > >> >> they said that NP's were far more likely if they did well on a
> > test
> > > >> >> to not know why -- as Michael Rogoff said, it was "strategy
> > unknown"
> > > >> >> time.   I use a study skills text "Success, Your Style!  Right &
> > > >> >> Left-Brain Techniques for Learning" by Nancy Lightfoot Matte and
> > > >> >> Susan Hilary Green Henderson (Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1995)in
> > the
> > > >> >> tutor training sessions -- it presents study strategies for both
> > > >> >> "types" (by the way -- NP's sound kind of right-brain to me) and
> > > >> >> discusses formal and informal learning style assessments, Taking
> > > >> >> Lecture Notes, Time Management Techniques, Studying for Tests,
> > Taking
> > > >> >> Tests, etc.  The tutors seem to really like it, because it gives
> > so
> > > >> >> many different tips and ideas -- they can literally match their
> > > >> >> students up to strategies that would work best for them.
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> By the way, the tutors really seem to like the group sessions
>and
> > > >> >> learning about learning strategies a lot better than watching
> > videos
> > > >> >> for training.  We do require them to watch a couple of videos
> > before
> > > >> >> they start tutoring (What to expect, etc. -- I use "The Tutor's
> > > >> >> Guide" ) and we use "The Master Tutor" for the mechanics of
> > tutoring,
> > > >> >> but really concentrate the training sessions on learning
> > techniques
> > > >> >> they can employ with their students so the tutees become better
> > > >> >> students overall.
> > > >> >>
> > > >> >> Hope this helps!
> > > >> >> Julie Jackson-Coe
> > > >> >> Academic Skills Specialist
> > > >> >> Learning Center
> > > >> >> Seton Hall
> > > >> >> Niagara University, NY 14109
> > > >> >> Ph. 716-286-8077
> > > >> >> Fax 716-286-8063
> > > >> >> [log in to unmask]
> > > >> >
> > > >> >--
> > > >> >-----------------------------------------------------
> > > >> >Click here for Free Video!!
> > > >> >http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/
> > > >> >
> > > >> >
> > > >> Lise Hedstrom
> > > >> Academic Specialist
> > > >> Student Academic Support Center
> > > >> Luther College
> > > >
> > > >--
> > > >-----------------------------------------------------
> > > >Click here for Free Video!!
> > > >http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/
> > > >
> > > >
> > > Lise Hedstrom
> > > Academic Specialist
> > > Student Academic Support Center
> > > Luther College
> >
> > --
> > -----------------------------------------------------
> > Click here for Free Video!!
> > http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/
> >
> >
> > --------------AC35000A772CF6F658B386D7
> > Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
> > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> >
> > <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
> > <html>
> > Lise (sorry I mispelled your name last time) et al.,
> > <p>Some textbooks, including Gardner &amp; Jewler's <i>Your College
> > Experience</i>,
> > include instruments based on Junge's typology. Another option is the
> > Keirsey
> > Temperament Sorter &lt;www.keirsey.com>. At the University of Georgia
> > (UGA)
> > we had the Keirsey available in another format in our learning center.
> > After students completed it, they discussed it with one of the
>counselors
> > working in the learning center prior to the discussion in our elective
> > self-awareness classes offered by UGA's Division of Academic Assistance.
> > In my early years at UGA (before some of the sophisticated computer
> > scoring
> > we have now) we administered the MBTI in class and then hand scored it,
> > but it became too expensive and too time consuming, especially when we
> > began branching out from our traditional required Developmental Studies
> > program to a range of courses and services available to all students at
> > the institution.
> > <p>I need to note here that the Keirsey is not as comprehensive as the
> > MBTI. The first Q I would ask students after their initial individual
> > interpretation
> > was whether they thought it sounded like them. Because of the way some
> > of the Qs are worded in the Keirsey, it really seems to ask how they
>would
> > like to be rather than how they behave/think.(As Gail mentioned,
> > preferences)&nbsp;
> > In my experience, it was on J/P that students most often disagreed with
> > their results, many coming out as J but thinking that P sounded more
>like
> > them.
> > <p>At the University of Minnesota General College (GC), one of the
>courses
> > I teach is the Psychology of Personal Adjustment. Over the course of the
> > semester, students have to write four papers applying the theoretical
> > information
> > in the text to their own development. I always give a choice of essay
> > topics.
> > One series of choices, and most students choose one of these, is to take
> > the Keirsey on-line and then relate the results to learning styles,
> > interpersonal
> > relationships (including roommates but family relationships are also a
> > choice), or career exploration. Students enjoy it, but also are directed
> > not to overgeneralize. One of my students referred to the Keirsey as
>"the
> > horoscope of personality."
> > <p>I try not to make guesses about types, because I know that no one
> > guesses
> > mine correctly. But it has been a standing joke between me and two of my
> > frequent co-authors that they are both Js and I am obviously a P. Two of
> > my new colleagues who are also INFPs pegged me correctly right away.
>(Does
> > it take one to know one?)
> > <p>Anyway, I find it useful to consider types in some situations; it can
> > help explain things sometimes. (When I first became acquainted with the
> > MBTI more than 20 years ago, it was part of a student affairs staff
>dev't
> > workshop, and we realized that all the counselors on that particular
>staff
> > were Fs and Ps, and all the student activity folks were Ts and Js. It
> > helped
> > us overcome some conflicts we were having--we could start laughing about
> > ourselves and our responses to one another!) But I also consider it
> > important
> > to not go too far with it.
> > <p>I also want to agree with Karen Smith that bumps along the way can be
> > a good thing. Aren't some of our returning students the most highly
> > motivated,
> > for exmple? My initial reaction was not to the thought that being on
> > probation
> > said something about the individual, but that we should take care to
> > individualize
> > the use of test results of this nature.
> > <p>Now if you really want to get me started, let's talk about the SAT!
> > Not really, I need to get off-line and get back to what I am supposed to
> > be doing today!
> > <p>Jeanne Higbee
> > <p>Lise Hedstrom wrote:
> > <blockquote TYPE=CITE>How do you know your students' MBTI profiles or
> > "scores"--do
> > you have them
> > <br>all take the MBTI, or are you able to discern their
> > <br>personality types on sight, Jeanne?&nbsp; We're working on MBTI as
> > an office
> > <br>group; I've not used it with tutors (although some have talked about
> > it) or
> > <br>in the classroom.&nbsp; Lise
> > <p>At 02:07 PM 04/04/2001 -0400, you wrote:
> > <br>>Lisa,
> > <br>>
> > <br>>Me, too, and perhaps hence the response. However, I was also
>thinking
> > about
> > <br>>many of my students who are Ps, and how their "go with the flow"
> > nature
> > can
> > <br>>energize and stimulate, how they can serve as catalysts in the
> > classroom.
> > My
> > <br>>most memorable students come in many sizes, shapes, and personality
> > types.
> > <br>>
> > <br>>I truly am an editor, and most who know me superficially would
>never
> > guess
> > <br>>that I am an INFP (especially the I!), but one of the standard
>grids
> > on
> > <br>>personality types states that INFPs tend to take on too much and
>then
> > somehow
> > <br>>get it all done. Again a generalization, but at least a more
>positive
> > on than
> > <br>>that of the probationary student!
> > <br>>
> > <br>>Jeanne Higbee
> > <br>>
> > <br>>Lise Hedstrom wrote:
> > <br>>
> > <br>>> I am a classical ("the editor") INFP, and I was never, ever on
> > academic
> > <br>>> probation.
> > <br>>>
> > <br>>> At 01:41 PM 04/04/2001 -0400, you wrote:
> > <br>>> >Hi, Everyone!
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >This is one of those times when I really do not need to get
>pulled
> > into
> > <br>>> >one of these discussions (so much to do, so little time!), so I
> > will keep
> > <br>>> >my response brief, but I feel the need to respond.
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >In some states only licensed psychologists are able to
>administer
> > the
> > <br>>> >MBTI these days. The reason is the concern about broad
> > generalizations
> > <br>>> >based on results. Yes, for some students P could just as easily
> > represent
> > <br>>> >"procrastinating" as "perceiving," but it is important that any
> > <br>>> >interpretation of MBTI results be individualized.
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >It might be very interesting to learn how many of the
>subscribers
> > to
> > <br>>> >LRNASST are INFPs and ENFPs. And how many of you were ever on
> > academic
> > <br>>> >probation?
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >I am not meaning to be critical, just to point out that it is
> > important
> > <br>>> >to take care when generalizing any test developed for individual
> > <br>>> >assessment to groups of people.
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >Jeanne Higbee
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >"Schulz, Karyn" wrote:
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >> Julie,
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> This is very interesting info.&nbsp; Thanks for sharing!
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> Karyn Schulz
> > <br>>> >> CCBC Essex
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> -----Original Message-----
> > <br>>> >> From: Julie Jackson-Coe [<a
> > href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">mailto:[log in to unmask]</a>]
> > <br>>> >> Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2001 1:34 PM
> > <br>>> >> To: [log in to unmask]
> > <br>>> >> Subject: LASSI (and Tutor Training)
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> Ameenah,
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> I've just returned from the Annual NYCLSA (New York College
> > Learning
> > <br>>> >> Skills Association) Conference and&nbsp; went to a great
>session
> > presented
> > <br>>> >> by Nancy Bailey and Michael Rogoff from Keuka College called
> > <br>>> >> "Identifying and Helping High Risk Students in the Academic
> > Trasition
> > <br>>> >> to College."&nbsp; They use the Meyers-Brigg type Indicator,
> > and found
> > <br>>> >> that first-year students exhibiting N and P preferences were
> > <br>>> >> "especially likely to report greater study difficulties,
>poorer
> > GPA's
> > <br>>> >> and lower scholastic self-perception" (from their presentation
> > <br>>> >> summary).&nbsp;&nbsp; If&nbsp; I took accurate notes, they
>said
> > that of the freshmen
> > <br>>> >> on probation, "NP's" were twice as likely to be on
> > probation!&nbsp;&nbsp;
> > They
> > <br>>> >> said that the most important "strategy" they could use with
> > these
> > <br>>> >> types was to teach them to preview their textbooks -- use the
> > <br>>> >> learning objectives and summaries in each chapter before they
> > started
> > <br>>> >> to read the chapter.
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> I have stressed this strategy before in tutor training
>sessions,
> > but
> > <br>>> >> again, after hearing the statistics presented at this
> > <br>>> >> session, I now mention it at EVERY training session (we run
> > group
> > <br>>> >> sessions on different topics about every other week).
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> As for Learning Style and then applying certain&nbsp; learning
> > strategies,
> > <br>>> >> I think this is all part of the same concept.&nbsp; In their
> > presentation,
> > <br>>> >> they said that NP's were far more likely if they did well on
> > a test
> > <br>>> >> to not know why -- as Michael Rogoff said, it was "strategy
> > unknown"
> > <br>>> >> time.&nbsp;&nbsp; I use a study skills text "Success, Your
> > Style!&nbsp;
> > Right &amp;
> > <br>>> >> Left-Brain Techniques for Learning" by Nancy Lightfoot Matte
> > and
> > <br>>> >> Susan Hilary Green Henderson (Wadsworth Publishing Co.,
>1995)in
> > the
> > <br>>> >> tutor training sessions -- it presents study strategies for
>both
> > <br>>> >> "types" (by the way -- NP's sound kind of right-brain to me)
> > and
> > <br>>> >> discusses formal and informal learning style assessments,
>Taking
> > <br>>> >> Lecture Notes, Time Management Techniques, Studying for Tests,
> > Taking
> > <br>>> >> Tests, etc.&nbsp; The tutors seem to really like it, because
> > it gives so
> > <br>>> >> many different tips and ideas -- they can literally match
>their
> > <br>>> >> students up to strategies that would work best for them.
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> By the way, the tutors really seem to like the group sessions
> > and
> > <br>>> >> learning about learning strategies a lot better than watching
> > videos
> > <br>>> >> for training.&nbsp; We do require them to watch a couple of
> > videos
> > before
> > <br>>> >> they start tutoring (What to expect, etc. -- I use "The
>Tutor's
> > <br>>> >> Guide" ) and we use "The Master Tutor" for the mechanics of
> > tutoring,
> > <br>>> >> but really concentrate the training sessions on learning
> > techniques
> > <br>>> >> they can employ with their students so the tutees become
>better
> > <br>>> >> students overall.
> > <br>>> >>
> > <br>>> >> Hope this helps!
> > <br>>> >> Julie Jackson-Coe
> > <br>>> >> Academic Skills Specialist
> > <br>>> >> Learning Center
> > <br>>> >> Seton Hall
> > <br>>> >> Niagara University, NY 14109
> > <br>>> >> Ph. 716-286-8077
> > <br>>> >> Fax 716-286-8063
> > <br>>> >> [log in to unmask]
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >--
> > <br>>> >-----------------------------------------------------
> > <br>>> >Click here for Free Video!!
> > <br>>> ><a
> >
>href="http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/">http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/</a>
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> >
> > <br>>> Lise Hedstrom
> > <br>>> Academic Specialist
> > <br>>> Student Academic Support Center
> > <br>>> Luther College
> > <br>>
> > <br>>--
> > <br>>-----------------------------------------------------
> > <br>>Click here for Free Video!!
> > <br>><a
> >
>href="http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/">http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/</a>
> > <br>>
> > <br>>
> > <br>Lise Hedstrom
> > <br>Academic Specialist
> > <br>Student Academic Support Center
> > <br>Luther College</blockquote>
> >
> > <p>--
> > <br>-----------------------------------------------------
> > <br>Click here for Free Video!!
> > <br><A
> >
>HREF="http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/">http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/</A>
> > <br>&nbsp;</html>
> >
> > --------------AC35000A772CF6F658B386D7--

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