Skip repetitive navigational links
View: Next message | Previous More Hitsmessage
Next in topic | Previous More Hitsin topic
Next by same author | Previous More Hitsby same author
Previous page (June 2001) | Back to main LRNASST-L page
Join or leave LRNASST-L (or change settings)
Reply | Post a new message
Search
Log in
Options:   Chronologically | Most recent first
Proportional font | Non-proportional font

Subject:

Re: An amazing lesson in tolerance in a small Tennessee town

From:

"[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 20 Jun 2001 00:19:51 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (422 lines)

i believe they also need to honour the many                                                              Christians and especially the large number of disabled who were experimented on with the programme operation T-4 and all the eugenics,sterilisations and infanticides of disabled during the holocaust.also many of my fellow french were occupied and tortured and killed in concentration camps at the hand of the Vichy government that occupied France from 1940 until 1944 when the allies liberated France during the D-Day liberation in Normandy

if you want more informations on the t-4  programme, go to www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hall/5950/Disabled.html


> > > > several articles for the
> > > >                         > > nine newspapers they work for in Germany and
> > > > Austria.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Whitwell and the Schroeders were hit with a
> > > > blizzard of paper clips from
> > > >                         > > the two countries. The couple soon had 46,000,
> > > > filling several large
> > > >                         > > plastic containers. The thing to do, they
> > > > decided, was to drive them to
> > > >                         > > Whitwell, 12 hours away.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > They received a hero's welcome. The entire
> > > > school showed up.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > None of the eighth-graders had ever met anyone
> > > > from outside the United
> > > >                         > > States, let alone anyone from Germany, the
> > > > country of the Holocaust
> > > >                         > > perpetrators. At the end of the four-day
> > > visit,
> > > > the students told their
> > > >                         > > principal, "They are really quite normal."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The Schroeders were so touched they wrote a
> > > > paperback about Whitwell.
> > > >                         > > "The Paper Clip Project," which has not been
> > > > translated into English,
> > > >                         > > was published in September 2000, in time for
> > > > Germany's largest book fair
> > > >                         > > in Frankfurt.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The blizzard of clips became an avalanche.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Whitwell eighth-graders came to Washington in
> > > > March last year to visit
> > > >                         > > the Holocaust Museum. They went home carrying
> > > > 24,000 more paper clips
> > > >                         > > collected by the Schroeders. Airport security
> > > > had trouble understanding
> > > >                         > > why a bunch of teenagers and their teachers
> > > were
> > > > transporting boxes and
> > > >                         > > boxes of paper clips
> > > >                         > > to Tennessee.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Linked to the Past Just a year later, the
> > > > Holocaust project has
> > > >                                 permeated
> > > >                         > > the school. The after-school group is the most
> > > > favored extracurricular
> > > >                         > > activity-students must compete in an essay
> > > > contest for its 20 to 25
> > > >                         > > places. They've become used to being
> > > interviewed
> > > > by local television and
> > > >                         > > national radio. Foreign countries are no
> > > longer
> > > > mysterious, with
> > > >                                 hundreds
> > > >                         > > of letters bearing witness to them.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The group's activities have long spilled over
> > > > from Roberts's classroom.
> > > >                         > > Across the hall, the students have created a
> > > > concentration-camp
> > > >                                 simulation
> > > >                         > > with paper cutouts of themselves pasted on the
> > > > wall. Chicken wire
> > > >                         > > stretches across the wall to represent
> > > > electrified fences. Wire mesh is
> > > >                         > > hung withshoes to represent the millions of
> > > > shoes the victims left
> > > >                                 behind
> > > >                         >when
> > > >                         > > they were marched to death chambers.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > And every year now they reenact the "walk" to
> > > > give students at least an
> > > >                         > > inkling of what people must have felt when
> > > > jackbooted Nazi guards
> > > >                         > > marched them off to camps. The students are
> > > > blindfolded, tied together
> > > >                                 by
> > > >                         > > the wrists, roughly ordered onto a truck and
> > > > driven to the woods. "I was
> > > >                         > > truly scared," recalls Monica Hammers, a
> > > > participant in last year's
> > > >                                 walk.
> > > >                         > > "It made me think, and it made me realize that
> > > I
> > > > have to put myself into
> > > >                         > > other people's shoes."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Meanwhile, the counting goes on. It is
> > > daunting.
> > > > On a late winter day,
> > > >                                 as
> > > >                         > > the picturesque valley floor shows the first
> > > > shimmer of soft green, 22
> > > >                         > > students gather for their Wednesday meeting.
> > > All
> > > > wear the group's polo
> > > >                         > > shirt, emblazoned: "Changing the World, One
> > > Clip
> > > > at a Time." The neat
> > > >                         > > white shirts conform to the school's dress
> > > code:
> > > > solid-colored shirts
> > > >                         > > devoid of large logos, solid-colored pants,
> > > > knee-length shorts or
> > > >                                 skirts,
> > > >                         > > worn with a belt. Many of the girls have
> > > > attached colored paper clips to
> > > >                         > > their collars.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > These are no loose-mannered kids-they reply
> > > > "yes, ma'am" and "yes,
> > > >                         > > sir." Even lunch in the cafeteria is
> > > disciplined
> > > > and relatively quiet.
> > > >                         > > Yet, there is an obvious and warm bond between
> > > > students and teachers.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The group's first item of business is opening
> > > > the mail that has
> > > >                         > > accumulated during the past three days. That
> > > > takes half of the two- to
> > > >                         > > three-hour meeting. A large package has
> > > arrived
> > > > from Germany, two
> > > >                                 smaller
> > > >                         > > ones from Austria and more than a dozen
> > > letters.
> > > > Laura Jefferies is in
> > > >                         > > charge of the ledger and keeps a neat record
> > > of
> > > > each sender's address,
> > > >                         > > phone number and e-mail address. One group of
> > > > students responds to the
> > > >                         > > e-mails sent via their Web site,
> > > > www.Marionschools.org.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Roberts opens the packages, which have been
> > > > examined in the principal's
> > > >                         > > office to make sure they contain nothing
> > > > dangerous. "We've had a few
> > > >                         > > negative letters from Holocaust deniers, but
> > > we
> > > > have never received a
> > > >                         > > threat," says the silver-haired Hooper. "But
> > > > even if we did, we would
> > > >                         > > go on. We cannot live in fear; that would
> > > defeat
> > > > the entire purpose."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The large package, from a German school,
> > > > contains about 40 letters, with
> > > >                         > > paper clips pasted onto each page. Roberts
> > > > sighs. "This is a huge amount
> > > >                         > > of work," she says. "There are days when I
> > > > wished we could just stop it.
> > > >                         > > But it has gotten way beyond us. It's no
> > > longer
> > > > about us. There is no
> > > >                         > > way we could stop this now."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > When the students fall behind, it's Roberts
> > > who
> > > > spends hours sorting and
> > > >                         > > filing.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The students crowd around Roberts's desk and
> > > > receive a letter at a time.
> > > >                         > > They carefully empty all paper clips onto
> > > little
> > > > piles. Drew Shadrick,
> > > >                         > > a strapping tackle on the football team, is
> > > the
> > > > chief counter and stands
> > > >                         > > over a three-foot-high white plastic barrel,
> > > > about the size of an oil
> > > >                         > > drum. He counts each clip, drops it into the
> > > > barrel, keeping track on a
> > > >                         > > legal pad. Two other barrels, which once
> > > > contained Coca-Cola syrup and
> > > >                         > > were donated by the corporation, are filled to
> > > > the rim and sealed with
> > > >                         > > transparent plastic.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > "It takes five strong guys to move one of
> > > those
> > > > barrels," says Roberts.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Against the wall this day are stacks and
> > > stacks
> > > > of boxes. In early
> > > >                         > > February, an Atlanta synagogue had promised 1
> > > > million paper clips, and
> > > >                         > > sure enough, a week later a pickup truck
> > > > delivered 84 boxes bought from
> > > >                                 an
> > > >                         > > office supply store. Half are still unopened.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > All sorts of clips arrive-silver- tone,
> > > > bronze-tone, plastic- coated
> > > >                         > > in all colors, small ones, large ones, round
> > > > ones, triangular clips and
> > > >                         > > artistic ones fashioned from wood.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Then there are the designs made of paper
> > > clips,
> > > > neatly pasted onto
> > > >                                 letter
> > > >                         > > paper. If removing the paper clips would
> > > destroy
> > > > the design, the
> > > >                         > > students count the clips, then replace them in
> > > > the barrel with an equal
> > > >                         > > number purchased by the group. The art is left
> > > > intact.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Occasionally a check for a few dollars
> > > arrives.
> > > > The money goes toward
> > > >                         > > buying supplies. Both Roberts and Smith won
> > > > teacher awards last year,
> > > >                                 and
> > > >                         > > their $3,000 in prize money also went toward
> > > > supplies, and helping
> > > >                         > > students pay for what has become an annual
> > > trip
> > > > to Washington and the
> > > >                         > > Holocaust Museum.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The students file all letters, all scraps of
> > > > paper, even the stamps, in
> > > >                         > > large white ring binders. By now, 5,000 to
> > > 8,000
> > > > letters fill 14 neat
> > > >                         > > binders.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > The letters are from 19 countries and 45
> > > states,
> > > > and include dozens of
> > > >                         > > rainbow pictures, and flowers, peace doves and
> > > > swastikas crossed out
> > > >                         > > with big red bars-in the shape of paper clips.
> > > > There are poems,
> > > >                         > > personal stories.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > "Today," one letter reads, "I am sending 71
> > > > paper clips to commemorate
> > > >                         > > the 71 Jews who were deported from
> > > Bueckeburg."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > One man sent five paper clips to commemorate
> > > his
> > > > mother and four
> > > >                         > > siblings murdered by the Nazis in Lithuania in
> > > > November 1941.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > "For my handicapped brother," says another
> > > > letter. "I'm so glad he
> > > >                         > > didn't live then; the Nazis would have killed
> > > > him."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > "For my grandmother," says another. "I'm so
> > > > grateful she survived the
> > > >                         > > camp."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > "For my son, that he may live in peace," wrote
> > > a
> > > > woman from Germany.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Last year, a letter containing eight paper
> > > clips
> > > > came from President
> > > >                         > > Clinton. Another arrived from Vice President
> > > > Gore, a native of
> > > >                                 Tennessee,
> > > >                         > > thanking the students for their "tireless
> > > > efforts to preserve and
> > > >                                 promote
> > > >                         > > human rights," but including no clips.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Every month, Smith writes dozens of
> > > celebrities,
> > > > politicians and sports
> > > >                         > > teams, requesting paper clips. He gets many
> > > > refusals, form letters
> > > >                         > > indicating that the addressee never saw the
> > > > request. But clips came in
> > > >                         > > from Tom Bosley (of TV's "Happy Days" fame),
> > > > Henry Winkler (the Fonz),
> > > >                                 Tom
> > > >                         > > Hanks, Elie Wiesel, Madeleine Albright. Among
> > > > the football teams that
> > > >                         > > contributed are the Tennessee Titans, the
> > > Tampa
> > > > Bay Buccaneers, the
> > > >                         > > Indianapolis Colts and the Dallas Cowboys.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > So many clips in memory of specific Holocaust
> > > > victims have come in that
> > > >                         > > one thing has become clear: Melting them into
> > > a
> > > > statue would be
> > > >                         > > inconceivable.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Each paper clip should represent one victim,
> > > the
> > > > students believe, and
> > > >                         > > so a new idea has been hatched.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > They want to get an authentic German railroad
> > > > car from the 1940s, one
> > > >                         > > that may have actually transported victims to
> > > > camps. The car would be
> > > >                         > > turned into a museum that would house all the
> > > > paper clips, as well as
> > > >                         > > display all the letters.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Dagmar and Peter Schroeder plan to travel to
> > > > Germanynext week to find a
> > > >                         > > suitable railroad car and have it transported
> > > to
> > > > Whitwell.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > They are determined to find such a car and the
> > > > necessary funding. Like
> > > >                         > > counting the clips, the task is daunting.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Whitwell's Legacy Whatever happens, for
> > > > generations of Whitwell eighth-
> > > >                         > > graders, a paper clip will never again be just
> > > a
> > > > paper clip, but instead
> > > >                         > > carry a message of patience, perseverance,
> > > > empathy and tolerance.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Roberts, asked what she thought she had
> > > > accomplished with the project so
> > > >                         > > far, said: "Nobody put it better than Laurie
> > > > Lynn [a student in last
> > > >                         > > year's class]. She said,
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > And Roberts adds: "That's all I could ever
> > > hope
> > > > to achieve as a
> > > >                                 teacher."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > She gives this week's assignment: "Tomorrow, I
> > > > want you all to go and
> > > >                                 sit
> > > >                         > > next to a person at lunch whom you never talk
> > > > with, a person that nobody
> > > >                         > > wants to sit with at lunch. I want you to stop
> > > > one of those people in
> > > >                                 the
> > > >                         > > hall and say: 'Hi! What'd you do last night?'
> > > > Now, don't make it obvious
> > > >                         > > -- they may know that it's just an assignment.
> > > > That would hurt."
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Drew pipes up: "Well, I've already tried that,
> > > > but that kid-that, you
> > > >                         > > know, he just sits there and stares, what can
> > > I
> > > > do?"
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > "Keep at it-don't give up," says Roberts.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Class dismissed.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Latest count: 2,108,622 paper clips. 3,891,378
> > > > to go.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > > Paper clips are gratefully accepted by:
> > > Whitwell
> > > > Middle School,
> > > >                                 Holocaust
> > > >                         > > Project, 1130 Main St., Whitwell, TN 37397 ©
> > > > 2001 The Washington Post
> > > >                         > > Company.
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > >
> > > >                         > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > **** Visit the TRIO List archives at
> > > HTTP://LISTSERV.NODAK.EDU/ARCHIVES/TRIO.HTML
> > > >
> > > > **** To leave the TRIO List send a message to
> > > [log in to unmask]
>

un proverbe francais tres important ""IMPOSSIBLE
N'EST PAS FRANCAIS".
un proverbe francais: "L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE"
AIDE-TOI ET LE CIEL T'AIDERA
la France ne peut Ítre la France sans la grandeur.
Francois Rabelais: Science sans conscience n'est
que de ruine l'ame.
Rene Descartes: je pense donc je suis
Une hirondelle ne fait pas le printemps
le proverb francais
le progres est puissance: Reagan-Lorraine Lavorata



__________________________________________________
Voila vous propose une boite aux lettres gratuite sur Voila Mail:
http://mail.voila.fr

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

July 2021
June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
January 2011
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
January 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.UFL.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager