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SOCNET  June 2001

SOCNET June 2001

Subject:

Nets of Power

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 2 Jun 2001 10:12:47 -0400

Content-Type:

TEXT/PLAIN

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (732 lines)

Dear SocNet Folks,

Thought the first item in this digest might interest you, for another take
on "nets". The rest is off-topic, but my cut-paste facilities are minimal
now.

Barry
 --------------------------------------------------------------------
  Barry Wellman      Professor of Sociology     NetLab Director
  [log in to unmask]   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman

  Centre for Urban & Community Studies      University of Toronto
  455 Spadina Avenue   Toronto Canada M5S 2G8   fax:+1-416-978-7162
 --------------------------------------------------------------------


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sat, 2 Jun 2001 00:00:03 -0400
From: Automatic digest processor <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: The DIGITALDIVIDE discussion group <[log in to unmask]>
To: Recipients of DIGITALDIVIDE digests <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: DIGITALDIVIDE Digest - 31 May 2001 to 1 Jun 2001 (#2001-47)

There are 11 messages totalling 713 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. CFP - Cultural Attitudes Toward Technology and Communication
  2. StarBand (2)
  3. Market rsch on demand 4 accessible IT
  4. The rest of the story (2)
  5. SBC National Telecommunications Partnership Awards
  6. Small Business (2)
  7. Site accessibility- a HUGE thank you
  8. Echoes in the Electronic Wind

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 31 May 2001 21:11:06 -0400
From:    gretchen ferris schoel <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: CFP - Cultural Attitudes Toward Technology and Communication



CFP -- CALL FOR PAPERS

International Conference on
CULTURAL ATTITUDES TOWARDS TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION
(CATaC'02)
12-15 July 2002
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
http://www.it.murdoch.edu.au/~sudweeks/catac02/

Conference theme:
The Net(s) of Power: Language, Culture and Technology

The powers of the Nets can be construed in many ways - political,
economic, and social. Power can also be construed in terms of Foucault's
"positive power" and Bourdieu's notion of "cultural capital" -
decentered  forms of power that encourage "voluntary" submission, such
as English as a _lingua franca_ on the Net.  Similarly, Hofstede's
category of "power distance" points to the role of status in encouraging
technology diffusion, as low-status persons seek to emulate high-status
persons.  Through these diverse forms of power, the language(s) and
media of the Net may reshape the cultural assumptions of its
globally-distributed users - thus raising the dangers of
"computer-mediated colonisation"  ("Disneyfication" - a la Cees
Hamelink).

This biennial conference series aims to provide an international forum
for the  presentation and discussion of cutting-edge research on how
diverse cultural attitudes shape the implementation and use of
information and communication technologies (ICT).  "Cultural attitudes"
here includes cultural values and communicative preferences that may be
embedded in both the content and form of ICT - thus threatening to make
ICT less the agent of a promised democratic global village and more an
agent of cultural homogenisation and imperialism. The conference series
brings together scholars from around the globe who provide diverse
perspectives, both in terms of the specific culture(s) they highlight in
their presentations and discussions, and in terms of the discipline(s)
through which they approach the conference theme. The first conference
in the series was held in London in 1998
(http://www.it.murdoch.edu.au/~sudweeks/catac98/). For an overview of
the themes and presentations of CATaC'98, see
http://wwwit.murdoch.edu.au/~sudweeks/catac98/01_ess.html. The second
conference in the series was held in Perth in 2000
(http://www.it.murdoch.edu.au/~sudweeks/catac00/).

Original full papers (especially those which connect theoretical
frameworks with specific examples of cultural values, practices, etc.)
and short papers (e.g. describing current research projects and
preliminary results) are invited. Papers should articulate the
connections between specific cultural values as well as current and/or
possible future communicative practices involving information and
communication technologies. We seek papers which, taken together, will
help readers, researchers, and practitioners of computer-mediated
communication - especially in the service of "electronic democracy" -
better understand the role of diverse cultural attitudes as hindering
and/or furthering the implementation of global computer communications
systems.

Topics of particular interested include but are not limited to:

- Impact of information and communication technologies on local and
indigenous languages and cultures.
- Politics of the electronic global village in democratising or
preserving hierarchy.
- Communicative attitudes and practices in industrialised and
industrialising countries.
- Role of gender in cultural expectations regarding appropriate
communicative behaviours.
- Ethical issues related to information and communication technologies,
and the impact on culture and communication behaviours.
- Issues of social justice raised by the dual problems of "the digital
divide" and "computer-mediated colonisation," including theoretical and
practical ways of overcoming these problems.

SUBMISSIONS

All submissions will be peer reviewed by an international panel of
scholars and researchers. There will be the opportunity for selected
papers to appear in special issues of journals and a book. Papers in
previous conferences have appeared in, for example, the Electronic
Journal of Communication/La Revue Electronique de Communication, AI and
Society Journal, Javnost- The Public, and New Media and Society. A book,
Culture, Technology, Communication: towards an Intercultural Global
Village, edited by Charles Ess with Fay Sudweeks, SUNY Press, New York,
is due for release in July 2001.

Initial submissions are to be emailed to [log in to unmask] as an
attachment (Word, HTML, PDF). Submission of a paper implies that it has
not been submitted or published elsewhere. At least one author of each
accepted paper is expected to present the paper at the conference.

Important Dates

Full papers: 15 March 2002
Short papers: 29 March 2002
Notification of acceptance: 5 April 2002
Final formatted papers: 26 April 2002

VENUE

The venue is Montreal, Quebec.

CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS
 Charles Ess, Drury University, USA, [log in to unmask]
 Fay Sudweeks, Murdoch University, Australia, [log in to unmask]
CONFERENCE VICE-CHAIR
 Lorna Heaton, University of Montreal, Canada, [log in to unmask]



gretchen f. schoel
[log in to unmask]

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 31 May 2001 16:03:27 -0800
From:    Steve Smith <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: StarBand



There was a recent discussion thread about Satellite Internet Services and
among those service providers there was mention of StarBand.

Someone replied that StarBand was out of business.   That is far from the
case.  We just started an educational project with StarBand in Alaska with
25 sites covering the state.

StarBand began offering residential service in Alaska in May.  I checked
with one of the local resellers and he is selling and installing systems at
a brisk pace.  When I saw the message I spoke directly with StarBand
corporate offices.  They are still very much in business.

Steve Smith
Chief Technology Officer
University of Alaska
Box 755320
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775
v: 907 474 6309  f: 907 474 7127
[log in to unmask]

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 09:51:00 -0400
From:    "Brenman, Marc" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Market rsch on demand 4 accessible IT



Please see below regarding an interesting market research study on demand
for accessible IT.  There is an incorrect statement, however:  "Generally
the prevalence of disability in developing countries is low."  Actually, the
prevalence of disability varies to some extent with socioeconomic status.
If a country has low per capita income and poor health facilities, it will
show more disabilities.  For example, see the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan
Africa.
Marc Brenman
[log in to unmask]

Jim Tobias, Inclusive Technologies ([log in to unmask]) "An Industry
Consortium Research Project"
This is an industry supported market research study to uncover the worldwide
demand for accessible information technology and telecommunications,
according to Tobias. There was a number of IT companies interested in
knowing and understanding the accessibility market internationally. Tobias
believes industry is not interested in medical conditions, but in functional
limitations aimed at design implications for each disability. For example,
"how many people cannot read an LCD with 6 mm letters?" There is no answer
for this in developed countries, let alone other parts of the world. The
principle challenge in this project, he continued is to formulate a model
that could be extrapolated with some credibility. What they are looking at
providing clients is linkage between what disability statistics are
presently available and their interpolations and extrapolations to
functional limitations.

There is little research in the underdeveloped world with the exception of a
recent report by Stephen Kaye at UCFS on the linkage between people with
disabilities and computer and Internet usage. The companies that are
participating in this project are not AT companies, but are mainstream
companies like Microsoft, Oracle, IBM, Panasonic and Verizon, who want to
make their mainstream products more acceptable and need to understand the
continuum of functional requirements. The idea of universal design is to
understand what can be done to products to extend the range of users who can
easily operate a technical piece of equipment and know what the limitations
are.

There are assumptions about the worldwide demand overtime - three, five and
ten years out. Tobias believes the demand for accessible products will
increase as the demand for mainstream IT and telecom products increases.
This assumes that as worldwide growth takes place, people with disabilities
are participating in that demand. Universally designed products have an
additional additive quality, similar to other innovations and will therefore
have their own demand curve. He further stated that worldwide awareness
would accelerate the demand for these products faster than the demand for
general technology.

In other parts of the world there is a greater chance that information
technology may be shared between users. One computer may by used by a number
of children in a classroom, making it more important that the equipment be
accessible so that the few children with a disability have access to that
computer, Tobias explained.

Information from Africa has been used as the first case study with data
collected from many countries based on interviews with key informants on
disability policy, as well as information technology and telecom policy. An
explicit development policy, according to Tobias targets people with
disabilities. A scarcity of information exists on functional limitations.

There is a greater need to understand the lower figures (2-3%) of the
disabled population in underdeveloped countries that have access to
technology. Tobias' group is looking for help in collating information from
international sources and converting it, with explicit warnings about the
credibility of the data. One of the purposes of this undertaken is to secure
support from these countries to develop surveys with the rationale of the
international statistics gathering to be to create a functional limitations
model.

Questions:
Who is underwriting the project?
Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Panasonic and Verizon underwrite the project. In
addition, the Georgia Tech Center on IT and Telecommunications, Technical
Assistance and Training is also underwriting project.

Generally the prevalence of disability in developing countries is low. How
are functional limitations defined?
One of the goals of the interviews is to get a clearer picture of the
questions asked. When someone has a visual impairment, does it mean they are
legally bind? How can be compare answers they have with answers we have? How
do we compare functional limitations?

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 10:27:02 -0400
From:    Mano Talaiver <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: StarBand



Thank you, Steve
The message on Starband threw me off too.
I called my partner.  Based on the pilot projects in Alaska, I have
requested for Starband in our technology and science intergration
project in some counties in Virgnia.  When I called my business partner
who has invested heavily in Starband, he did not agree with the
statement of bankrupcy.  He will be working with me on our project.

If I hear anything further, I will keep you all posted.

Mano Talaiver
Director
Learning Technologies
Science Museum of Virginia
Richmond, VA
804-864-1416
[log in to unmask]

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Smith [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2001 8:03 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [DIGITALDIVIDE] StarBand




There was a recent discussion thread about Satellite Internet Services
and
among those service providers there was mention of StarBand.

Someone replied that StarBand was out of business.   That is far from
the
case.  We just started an educational project with StarBand in Alaska
with
25 sites covering the state.

StarBand began offering residential service in Alaska in May.  I checked
with one of the local resellers and he is selling and installing systems
at
a brisk pace.  When I saw the message I spoke directly with StarBand
corporate offices.  They are still very much in business.

Steve Smith
Chief Technology Officer
University of Alaska
Box 755320
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775
v: 907 474 6309  f: 907 474 7127
[log in to unmask]

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 11:39:54 -0400
From:    Larry Libman <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: The rest of the story



Jeanne-

Your knowledge of history is good, and your analysis of the present day
causes of the digital divide is a good one, but I wonder "why" you're
concentrating on things you can't do anything about, when so many people in
this country lag woefully behind in knowledge about our level of technology.
To paraphrase the first chapter in a book you recently wrote, the internet
provides a means of communication between people.  Lets promote Access to
computers, Teach people to use them, and give them the information they need
to make their environment a better place.  We want to empower the people to
change the system!

Larry Libman
The Technology Access Centers Coalition
c/o The Human Services Coalition
260 NE 17th Terrace
Suite 200
Miami, Fl  33132
[log in to unmask]


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeanne F." <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2001 3:58 PM
Subject: Re: [DIGITALDIVIDE] The rest of the story


>
>
> >> They're bumbling idiots, just like the rest of us.
> >
> >Ahem.
> >
> >> capitalism, by its very nature, has the attribute of transparency.
> >
> ...
>
> >The difficulty I have is reconciling that with the growing economic gap
> >between the "haves and have-nots," which I have also seen correlated to
the
> >Digital Divide (grasping at remaining on topic).  :-)
> >
> >- Bill Hawk (an engineer, not an economist, although I will argue about
> >anything)
>
>
> OK, I'll admit we're not ALL idiots even though I like to do my share
:-)
>
> And I stand corrected about capitalism "by its very nature." It's actually
> a result of how it's been practiced, as regulated by the government in the
> U.S. (via Financial Accounting Standards Board rules) and other such
> regulations in other countries. This is the regulated disclosure that
gives
> publicly held corporations their transparency, such as it is. (I'd love to
> see shareholders revolt and demand more, but that's definitely off-topic).
>
> The economic gap between the "haves and have-nots" is one of the many
> sorrows of life. To this I would make three comments. First, at some
point,
> we were all undeveloped and became developed by suffering through truly
> loony excesses of capitalism -- hopefully the currently undeveloped world
> will skip that phase. Two, if the gap is a result of increasing wealth (as
> in countries such as Ireland and Spain), then the fact that there are
still
> poor countries is bad, but the fact that there are more wealthy countries
> is not. So it's not so much the gap, as the fact that there are too many
> still at the wrong end. Three, responsible capitalism can be a huge,
> positive force to alleviate poverty. Twenty five years ago, Ireland was a
> poor country whose youth fled to England and elsewhere because there were
> no jobs. Now, as a partial result of multinational corporate investment,
my
> cousins get to live where they grew up, have cool jobs, and occasionally
> grace us with their presence because they have expendable income.
>
> And finally, what does this all have to do with the Digital Divide? Good
> question. The DD is obviously representative of the ills that affect the
> world. Its solution, however, also has the possibility of beginning to
> solve some of those other ills as well. Knowledge is not only power, it's
> hope.
>
> Jeanne Follman
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> ******************************************************
> GETTING the WEB:
> Understanding the Nature and Meaning of the Internet
> Download free chapters at: http://www.duomopress.com
> ******************************************************
>

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 10:06:03 -0400
From:    Sara Melnick <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: SBC National Telecommunications Partnership Awards



The SBC National Telecommunications Partnership Awards recognize
outstanding work in facilitating the integration of telecommunications
technology into education.  This year, the focus of the awards will be on
education partnerships that work to bridge the Digital Divide.  Eligible
partnerships must target underserved populations with goal(s) to:

increase access to basic and advanced technologies;
link learners to information and content through technology;
provide computer and technology literacy training; or
provide technology skills development for educators.

The top two winning partnerships will receive cash awards of $5,000 each, a
third will receive $3,500 and there will be 15 honorable mentions.  Two
representatives from each of the top three winning programs will receive
travel and registration to the 2001 National Symposium on Partnership in
Education in Anchorage, Alaska where they will be recognized.  They will
also receive travel to an event in Washington, D.C. at which members of
Congress who have made a contribution to bridging the Digital Divide will
be honored.

Applications for the 2001 SBC National Telecommunications Partnership
Awards will be judged on the history, program goals and objectives, program
activities and management, sustainability and evaluation outcomes of the
partnership.  Judges will look for programs that are innovative in the way
they strive to bridge the Digital Divide.  See the Partners in Education
web site (www.partnersineducation.org) for a detailed description of the
awards program and to download the application brochure.

Nominations are due July 9, 2001.  Contact Sara Melnick at the National
Association of Partners in Education at [log in to unmask] if you have any
questions.


<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
Sara Melnick
Director, Projects and Programs
National Association of Partners in Education, Inc.
901 North Pitt Street, Suite 320
Alexandria, VA  22314
Ph 703.836.4880 x13
F   703.836.6941

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 07:20:38 -0700
From:    "Fernando A. Smith" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Small Business



I am a MIS Student in ohio and I am interested in how
the digital divide effects small business and the lack
of automation in these firms, could someone point me
in the right direction

[log in to unmask]

=====
Fernando A. Smith
 Unity Lodge No. 115 PHF&AM
Unity Chapter No. 95 OES PHA
    ... ..... .......
"Travel Light, Travel Right"

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35
a year!  http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 13:39:55 -0400
From:    Larry Libman <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Small Business



Fernando-

Try contacting SCORE (The Service Core of Retired Executives)(www.score.org)
or The Small Business Administration
(www.sba.gov)

Larry Libman
The Technology Centers Access Coalition
c/o The Human Services Coalition
260 NE 17th Terrace
Suite 200
Miami, Fl  33132
[log in to unmask]
----- Original Message -----
From: "Fernando A. Smith" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2001 10:20 AM
Subject: [DIGITALDIVIDE] Small Business


>
>
> I am a MIS Student in ohio and I am interested in how
> the digital divide effects small business and the lack
> of automation in these firms, could someone point me
> in the right direction
>
> [log in to unmask]
>
> =====
> Fernando A. Smith
>  Unity Lodge No. 115 PHF&AM
> Unity Chapter No. 95 OES PHA
>     ... ..... .......
> "Travel Light, Travel Right"
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail - only $35
> a year!  http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/
>

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 13:46:48 -0400
From:    Linda George <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Site accessibility- a HUGE thank you



*crossing my fingers that this is NOT sent in HTML...*

Thank you all for your input on making my site accessible to all. This
experience was invaluable to me.

I was lucky enough to have a Jaws user offer to testdrive my site. If it
were not for him, I am not sure that I would ever understand all the jargon
and nuances that are necessary to code a site for the blind.

I also received some other very important tips about some of my language and
also about some of the programs I was asking people to use.

I surely hope I can incorporate all the changes that were suggested to me.
Again, thank you all so much!!

I will make sure to mention your assistance during my  **gulp**
presentation!

Sincerely,
Linda George

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 10:32:43 +0000
From:    Frank Odasz <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Echoes in the Electronic Wind



Greetings,

An article referencing resources specific to Native American issues,
community technology centers, and community networking has been posted in
this week's issue of Canku Ota (Many Paths) http://www.turtletrack.org, more
specifically at:
http://www.turtletrack.org/Issues01/Co06022001/CO_06022001_Echoes.htm

A grant template is posted that details how to engage cultural groups in
community technology center activities in order to grow a local community
network. http://lone-eagles.com/Bartgrant.doc

Other Cultural self-empowerment resources are listed at
http://lone-eagles.com/teled.htm

Please share without restriction. I'll be at CTCnet in San Diego. See you
there, Andy!

All the best,

Frank Odasz
Lone Eagle Consulting


Below is part of a related posting regarding similar International efforts,
http://greenstar.org is another interesting effort. What I'd like to find is
someone keeping a high quality, current, master listing of these types of
exciting initiatives, and particularly of the best training resources, such
as this Teen Web Design Curriculum from www.americaconnects.net:
http://www.americaconnects.net/learn/learningdesign.pdf


PEOPLink is a pioneering non-profit organization formed in 1996 to help
artisans and SMEs participate in global E-commerce. We are particularly
experienced in issues pertaining to the artisans, women, Indigenous groups
and, generally, the "poorest of the poor" by our training of 55 Trading
Partners in 22 countries to create and maintain their own Web catalogs.
More information can be seen in the presentation I made at the World Trade
Organization at http://www.peoplink.org/wto   The Rockefeller Foundation
commissioned a $130,000 study of the potential for PEOPLink to contribute to
development goals which can be seen at
http://www.peoplink.org/reports/shg2000.ppt  Our draft business plan can be
seen at http://www.peoplink.org/reports/webbpmay9.doc

We recently "soft-launched" our new CatGen (for catalog generator) system
which we feel will revolutionize E-commerce for SMEs.  Users can download
the CatGen client for free and then, working off-line, can create and
maintain a database that includes all relevant product specifications
including digital images. Users can include additional information on the
enterprise as well as details on process, cultural context, and
environmental impact. CatGen can also be used to print a paper catalog on an
inexpensive color printer. Then, with just a click of a mouse, CatGen can
upload the user's database to the CatGen.com server to generate a Web
catalog which includes the enterprise home page in the CatGen.com domain
with the product information and presentation the user chooses. As the user
updates information on the local database, the Web catalog is also updated
by going on-line just long enough to transmit the changes. Our basic Web
hosting for up to 100 products or services is free. CatGen.com's revenue
will come from modest fees and commissions for value-added services. More
information available at http://www.catgen.com and
http://www.catgen.com/presentation1/ppt  We have 10 full time developers
enhancing CatGen and, whether we develop an institution relationship for
Cot-Com or not, it is available for your use at any time.  What needs to be
developed are mechanisms for providing training, technical assistance, and
marketing.


Frank Odasz
Lone Eagle Consulting
Email: [log in to unmask]
Web: http://lone-eagles.com

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 1 Jun 2001 14:47:47 -0400
From:    Larry Libman <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: The rest of the story



For people who do not have computer access, how about web TV?  Maybe someone
could influence the powers that be to broadcast the internet, so that
individuals without cable and without satellite dishes could get the
internet.  Just a thought.

Larry Libman
The Technology Access Centers Coalition
260 NE 17th Terrace
Suite 200
Miami, Fl  33132
[log in to unmask]


----- Original Message -----
From: <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2001 10:18 AM
Subject: Re: [DIGITALDIVIDE] The rest of the story


>
>
> I'd like to add my 2 cents worth, here.  Many of my potential
> readers/contributors do not even have access to phone service, let alone
the
> Internet.  A case in point:  A young woman from the Navajo Reservation won
an
> IMAC, over a year ago.  Because she had no phone, her story was "picked"
up
> by local news and it came to the attention of Bill Clinton, who introduced
> her and her plight when he visited the area in April of 2000.  Well, to
make
> a long story short, this young woman JUST got a phone connection.  Over a
> year later.
>
> To make matters worse, because of the lack of phone services, emergencies
are
> not handled in a prompt manner, causing needless deaths.
>
> It seems that the "richest" nation on earth could work harder to bridge
the
> gaps between the haves and have-nots...especially for basic services.
>
> Thank you,
> Vicki Lockard
> [log in to unmask]
> "Canku Ota" (Many Paths) editor
> http://www.turtletrack.org
>

------------------------------

End of DIGITALDIVIDE Digest - 31 May 2001 to 1 Jun 2001 (#2001-47)
******************************************************************

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