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PSYART  February 2003, Week 4

PSYART February 2003, Week 4

Subject:

FW: NYTimes.com Article: Repress Yourself

From:

Murray Schwartz <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 26 Feb 2003 09:35:33 -0500

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> From:         [log in to unmask]
> Subject:      NYTimes.com Article: Repress Yourself
>
> This article from NYTimes.com
> has been sent to you by [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> Repress Yourself
>
> February 23, 2003
> By LAUREN SLATER
>
>
>
>
>
>
> You've been in therapy for years.You've time-traveled back
> to your childhood home, to your mother's makeup mirror with
> its ring of pearl lights. You've uncovered, or recovered,
> the bad baby sitter, his hands on you, and yet still,
> you're no better. You feel foggy and low; you flinch at
> intimate touch; you startle at even the slightest sounds,
> and you are impaired. Hundreds of sessions of talk have led
> you here, back to the place you started, even though you've
> followed all advice. You have self-soothed and dredged up;
> you have cried and curled up; you have aimed for
> integration in your fractured, broken brain.
>
> This is common, the fractured, broken brain and the
> uselessness of talk therapy to make it better. A study done
> by H.J. Eysenck in 1952, a study that still causes some
> embarrassment to the field, found that psychotherapy in
> general helped no more, no less, than the slow passing of
> time. As for insight, no one has yet demonstrably proved
> that it is linked to recovery. What actually does help is
> anyone's best guess -- probably some sort of fire, directly
> under your behind -- and what leads to relief? Maybe love
> and work, maybe medicine. Maybe repression. Repression?
> Isn't that the thing that makes you sick, that splits you
> off, so demons come dancing back? Doesn't that cause holes
> in the stomach and chancres in the colon and a general
> impoverishment of spirit? Maybe not. New research shows
> that some traumatized people may be better off repressing
> the experience than illuminating it in therapy. If you're
> stuck and scared, perhaps you should not remember but
> forget. Avoid. That's right. Tamp it down. Up you go.
>
> The new research is rooted in part in the experience of
> Sept. 11, when swarms of therapists descended on New York
> City after the twin towers fell. There were, by some
> estimates, three shrinks for every victim, which is itself
> an image you might want to repress, the bearded, the
> beatnik, the softly empathic all gathered round the
> survivors urging talk talk talk. ''And what happened,''
> says Richard Gist, a community psychologist and trauma
> researcher who, along with a growing number of colleagues,
> has become highly critical of these debriefing procedures,
> ''is some people got worse. They were either unhelped or
> retraumatized by our interventions.'' Gist, who is an
> associate professor at the University of Missouri and who
> has been on hand to help with disasters from the collapse
> of the Hyatt Regency pedestrian skywalks in Kansas City,
> Mo., in 1981 to the United Airlines crash in Sioux City,
> Iowa, in 1989, has had time to develop his thoughts
> regarding how, or how not, to help in times of terror.
> ''Basically, all these therapists run down to the scene,
> and there's a lot of grunting and groaning and encouraging
> people to review what they saw, and then the survivors get
> worse. I've been saying for years, 'Is it any surprise that
> if you keep leading people to the edge of a cliff they
> eventually fall over?'''
>
> Based in part on the findings that encouraging people to
> talk immediately after a trauma can actually emblazon fear
> more deeply into the brain, researchers began to question
> the accepted tenets of trauma treatment, which have at
> their center the healing power of story. In Tel Aviv, three
> researchers, Karni Ginzburg, Zahava Solomon and Avi Bleich,
> studied heart-attack victims in an effort to determine
> whether those who repressed the event fared better in the
> long run. ''Repression'' is a word that radiates far beyond
> its small syllabic self; it connotes images of hysterical>
> amnesiacs on magic mountains or mist-swaddled Viennese
> streets. But in experimental psychology, as opposed to
> psychoanalysis, repression has far more mundane meanings;
> it is used to describe those who minimize, distract, deny.
> Is it possible that folks who employ these techniques cope
> better than the rest of us ramblers? In order to address
> this question, Ginzburg and her collaborators followed 116
> heart-attack patients at three hospitals in Israel with the
> aim of assessing who developed post-traumatic stress
> disorder and who went home whistling. Ginzburg's team was
> particularly interested in exploring the long-term effects
> of a repressive coping style; some earlier research
> demonstrated that those who deny are, in fact, better off
> in the short term. But there remained the larger questions:
> What happens to these stern stoics over time? Do they break
> down? Do memories and symptoms push through? Ginzburg's
> team assessed its subjects within one week of their heart
> attacks and then seven months later. During the first
> assessment, the team evaluated, among other things, the
> patient's general coping style using a series of scales
> that reflect the tendency to avoid and to deny. The
> researchers defined repressors as those who exhibited ''a
> specific combination of anxiety and defensiveness'' as
> measured on the self-reported scales.
>
> They found that those patients who had high anxiety and low
> defensiveness -- in other words, those patients who had a
> lift-the-lid approach to their experience, thinking about
> it, worrying about it, processing it -- had a far poorer
> outcome than their stiff-lipped counterparts. Specifically,
> of the stiff-lipped stylers, only 7 percent developed
> post-traumatic stress disorder seven months after the
> infarction, compared with 19 percent of the voluble ones.
>
> The Israeli study hypothesizes at one point that repression
> may work as a coping style because those who ignore have a
> uniquely adaptive perceptual style. Repressors, others
> posit, may be protected by their presuppositions regarding
> -- and subsequent perceptions of -- stressful events,
> meaning that where you see a conflagration, they see a
> campfire, where you see a downpour, they see a drizzle.
> Still other researchers suggest that repressors are good at
> repressing because they can manipulate their attention,
> swiveling it away from the burned body or the hurting
> heart, and if that fails, they believe that they can cope
> with what befalls them. They think they're competent, those
> with the buttoned-up backs. Whether they really are or are
> not competent is not the issue; repressors, Ginzburg
> suggests, think they are, and anyone who has ever read
> ''The Little Engine That Could'' knows the power of
> thinking positively when it comes to making it over the
> mountain.
>
> George Bonanno, an associate professor of psychology at
> Columbia University Teachers College, has found similar
> results in his many inquiries into the role of repression
> and avoidance in healthy coping styles. And, unlike the
> Israeli researchers, Bonanno has used scales that go beyond
> self-report to determine who's repressing what and how that
> person fares. For instance, in a study of bereaved widows
> and widowers, Bonanno used a technique called verbal
> autonomic association. He had people talk about their loss
> while he looked at autonomic arousal (heartbeat, pulse
> rates and galvanic skin responses). What he saw: a subgroup
> of mourners who consistently said they weren't distressed
> while displaying high heart rates. ''These are the
> repressors,'' Bonanno says. ''And these people, the ones
> who showed this pattern, had less grief over time and had a
> better overall life adjustment, and this has been
> consistent across studies.'' Bonanno has recently completed
> a study involving adolescent girls and young women who are>
> sexual-abuse survivors. ''The girls who chose not to talk
> about the sexual abuse during the interview, the girls who
> measured higher on repression scales, these were the
> repressors, and they also had fewer internalizing symptoms
> like depression and anxiety and fewer externalizing
> symptoms like hostility and acting out. They were
> better-adjusted.''
>
> Bonanno pauses. ''I've been studying this phenomenon for 10
> years,'' he says. ''I've been deeply troubled. My work's
> been in top journals, but it's still being dismissed by
> people in the field. In the 1980's, trauma became an
> official diagnosis, and people made their careers on it.
> What followed was a plethora of research on how to heal
> from trauma by talking it out, by facing it down. These
> people are not likely to believe in an alternative
> explanation. People's intellectual inheritance is deeply
> dependent upon a certain point of view.''
>
> George Bonanno works in New York City, while Richard Gist
> works in Kansas City; the doctors have never spoken, but
> they should. They share a lot. Gist told me: ''The problem
> with the trauma industry is this: People who successfully
> repress do not turn up sitting across from a shrink, so we
> know very little about these folks, but they probably have
> a lot to teach us. For all we know, the repressors are
> actually the normal ones who effectively cope with the many
> tragedies life presents. Why are we not more fascinated
> with these displays of resilience and grace? Why are we
> only fascinated with frailty? The trauma industry knows
> they can make money off of frailty; there are all these
> psychologists out there turning six figures with their
> pablum and hubris.''
>
> Gist, who speaks with a Midwestern twang and knows how to
> turn a rococo phrase, also insists on plain figures to back
> up whatever he says. According to Gist, meta-analyses of
> debriefing procedures, a subset of trauma work that
> encourages catharsis through talk, simply do not support
> the efficacy of many of the interventions. Both Gist and
> Bonanno say they believe that the accepted interventions,
> like narrative catharsis, remain in use for pecuniary,
> political and historical reasons, reasons that have nothing
> to do with curing people.
>
> And the history of these reasons? The trauma field is broad
> and might have begun at any of a number of points: there
> was Freud, who originally believed that female hysteria was
> caused by childhood sexual abuse, only to abandon the idea
> later in favor, perhaps, of something less jarring to
> Victorian sensibilities; even before Freud, there was Jean
> Martin Charcot, who posited his patients' fits of hysterics
> to be somatic expressions of buried traumatic memories. But
> for modern-day purposes, the trauma industry seems to have
> started sometime in the early 1980's, when the women's
> movement asserted that post-traumatic stress disorder did
> not belong to Vietnam veterans alone; it belonged also to
> the legions of women who were abused in domestic
> situations. Mostly middle-class, well-educated women seeing
> private therapists began to whisper their stories, stories
> that contradicted the dominant belief in most psychiatric
> textbooks that incest occurred in one family per million.
> And yet here were Ph.D.'s and Ed.D.'s and Psy.D.'s and
> L.C.S.W.'s hearing that no, it happened here, and here, and
> here, behind this bedroom door, in this dark night, under
> the same shared suburban sky where we do not live safely.
> Thus, from their very inception, incest accounts were
> subversive stories, and their telling became acts of
> political and personal rehabilitation. Silence, as far as
> sexual abuse was concerned -- and this quickly radiated out
> to all forms of trauma -- was tantamount to toxic
> conformity. Only speech would save.
>
> It makes sense, therefore, that the tools deployed to help>
> survivors were largely verbal and emphasized narrative
> reconstruction. Trauma (the word means ''wound'' in Greek)
> is seen as a rupture in the long line of language that
> constructs who we are. The goal of treatment has
> traditionally been, therefore, to expand the story so that
> it can accommodate a series of unexpected scenes. By the
> early 1990's, neurological models of broken narratives were
> being developed. Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, for instance,
> hypothesized that repressed trauma has very specific neural
> correlates in the brain. The event -- say, the rape, the
> plane crash -- is isolated, flash-frozen in a nonverbal
> neural stream, where it stays stuck, secreting its
> subterranean signals of fear and panic. The goal of trauma
> treatment has been to move memories from nonverbal brain
> regions to verbal ones, where they can be integrated into
> the life story.
>
> This, to my mind, is a beautiful theory, one that blesses
> the brain with malleable storage sites and incredible plot
> power -- but whether it's true or not, no one knows. More
> to the point, whether it's true for all people, no one
> knows. While storying one's life is undoubtedly an
> essential human activity, the trauma industry may have
> overlooked this essential fact: not all of us are
> memoirists. Some of us tell our stories by speaking around
> them, a kind of Carveresque style where resolution is
> whispered below the level of audible language. Then again,
> some of us are fable writers, developing quick tales with
> tortoises and hares, where right and wrong have a lovely,
> simple sort of sound. If we are all authors of our
> experience, as the trauma industry has so significantly
> reminded us, we are not all cut from the same literary
> cloth. Some of us are wordy, others prefer the smooth white
> space between tightly packaged paragraphs. Still others
> might rather sing over the scary parts than express them at
> all.
>
> Here's the question: at what cost, this singing? Jennifer
> Coon-Wallman, a psychotherapist based in Lexington, Mass.,
> asks, ''By singing over or cutting off a huge part of your
> history, aren't you then losing what makes life rich and
> multifaceted?'' I suppose so, but let me tell you this.
> I've had my fair share of traumas -- I'm sure you have, too
> -- and if I could learn to tamp them down and thereby prune
> my thorny lived-out-loud life a little, I'd be more than
> happy to. Go ahead. Give me a lock and key.
>
> Girvani Leerer of Arbour-H.R.I. Hospital in Brookline,
> Mass., doesn't necessarily agree with my lock-and-key
> longings. ''Facing and talking about trauma is one of the
> major ways people learn to cope with it. They learn to
> understand their feelings and their experiences and to move
> out, beyond the event.'' On the one hand, Gist told me,
> referring to the work done in Israel, ''Ginzburg's study,
> despite its limitations, is right on and has done us a
> great service.'' On the other hand, Dr. Amy Banks, a
> faculty member at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute
> at Wellesley College, says: ''Ginzburg's study is
> interesting, but it's weak. It's saying repression is
> useful for repressors. Is repression useful for those of us
> with different styles? I doubt it. I think it's probably
> harmful.''
>
> Banks's sentiments ultimately win out with doctors and
> patients, professionals and lay people. ''The Courage to
> Heal,'' a book by Ellen Bass and Laura Davis about trauma
> and talk, has sold more than 700,000 copies. Dr. Judith
> Herman, the director of training at the Victims of Violence
> Program at Cambridge Hospital, in her updated book ''Trauma
> and Recovery,'' continues to advocate narrative and
> catharsis. And a quick scan of trauma Web sites shows that
> plebeians like you and me are still chatting up a brutal
> bloody storm.
>
> Beyond the general reactions, there are some specific>
> methodological criticisms clinicians have with the Ginzburg
> study, one of which is its implicit comparison of
> sexual-abuse survivors to heart-attack victims. Banks says:
> ''Trauma that happens at the hands of another human being
> has a much greater psychological impact than trauma that
> happens from a physical illness, accident or even natural
> disaster. There's a bigger destruction in trust and
> relationships. And to further complicate things, sexual
> abuse usually happens over time, in a situation of secrecy,
> to what may be a preverbal child. A heart attack is a
> public event that involves fully verbal adults who have so
> much more control over their world.'' Yes and no.
> Certainly, sexual abuse has an element of shame that
> medical events don't tend to carry. But as Ginzburg notes
> at the start of her study, a heart attack is ''a stressful
> life-threatening experience.'' The death rate is high, the
> rate of recurrence higher still, and if that doesn't do it
> for you, consider the symbolic meaning of the heart, that
> central valentine in its mantle of muscle. Consider the
> fear when it starts to fibrillate, and then the pain, and
> afterward, you'll never trust that tired pump again. In
> both sexual abuse and devastating medical events, the sense
> of self is shattered, and this commonality may unite the
> disparate traumas in essential ways.
>
> And yet clinicians still resist the relevance of the
> Ginzburg findings. Bononno says, ''We just don't want to
> admit they could be true,'' and that's true. The repression
> results appear to insult more than challenge us, and this
> feeling of insult is almost, if not more, interesting than
> the findings themselves. We are offended. Why?
>
> Alexis de Tocqueville might know. In 1831, when he came to
> this country, he observed as perhaps no one has since its
> essential character. Tocqueville saw our narcissism, our
> puritanism, but he also saw the romanticism that lies at
> the core of this country. We believe that the human spirit
> is at its best when it expresses; the individualism that
> Tocqueville described in his book ''Democracy in America''
> rests on the right, if not the need, to articulate your
> unique internal state. Repression, therefore, would be
> considered anti-American, antediluvian, anti-art and
> terribly Teutonic. At its very American best, the self is
> revealed through pen and paint and talk. Tocqueville saw
> that this was the case. So did Emerson and Thoreau and of
> course Whitman, who upheld the ideas of transcendentalism,
> singing the soul, letting it all out.
>
> But the resistance to repression goes back even further
> than the 19th century. Expression as healing and,
> consequently, repression as damaging can be found as far
> back as the second century, when the physician and writer
> Galen extended Hippocrates's theory that the body is a
> balance of four critical humors: black bile, yellow bile,
> phlegm and blood. Disease, especially emotional disease,
> Galen suggested, is the result of an internal imbalance
> among these humors, and healing takes place when the
> physician can drain the body, and soul, of its excess
> liquid weight. Toward this end, purging, emetics and
> leeches were used. Wellness was catharsis; catharsis was
> expression. It's easy to see our current-day talking cures
> and trauma cures as Galenic spinoffs, notions so deeply
> rooted in Western culture that to abandon them would be to
> abandon, in some senses, the philosophical foundations on
> which medicine and religion rest.
>
> To embrace or even consider repression as a reasonable
> coping style is a threat to the romantic ideals so central
> to this culture, despite our post-modern sheen.
> Postmodernism, with its pesky protestations that there is
> no ultimate history or total truth, inadvertently ends up
> underscoring just these things. We're still all Walt>
> Whitman at heart. Our response to the research illuminates
> this.
>
> And of course, practically speaking, there are real reasons
> why we would not want to embrace the current findings. Our
> entire multimillion-dollar trauma industry would have to be
> revamped. There are in this country thousands of trauma and
> recovery centers predicated upon Whitman-esque expression,
> and sizable portions of the self-help industry are devoted
> to talking it out. While there wouldn't be a countrywide
> economic crash if repression came back into vogue, there
> would be some serious educational, political and medical
> upheavals. Federally financed programs would go down. Best
> to avoid that. Best to just repress the thought.
>
> What would therapy look like if repression came back into
> vogue? Here's Dusty Miller. She lives and works in
> Northampton, Mass. She's well into her 50's, with blue eyes
> and moccasins. Her office is small and spartan. On the wall
> there is a picture of Audre Lorde and the words ''When I
> dare to be powerful -- to use my strength in the service of
> my vision -- than it becomes less and less important
> whether I am afraid.'' Miller knows this to be true.
>
> Before Miller was a psychologist, she was a patient. Before
> she was a patient, she was a victim, visited nightly by her
> father, who she says physically and sexually abused her,
> and this for years and years. At Cornell, where she was an
> undergraduate, Miller went into therapy, first to be told
> in the early 1960's that her memories were wishes and then
> to be told in the 1980's that they were true and that her
> job was to be Nancy Drew, shining a flashlight into all the
> dark places.
>
> Which is what Miller did in the 1980's. She went back over
> and over the memories of trauma and got sicker and sicker.
> ''After many therapy sessions I'd be a quivering ball, and
> then I'd leave the office and take my credit card and go
> out and spend $500 on clothes I didn't need.'' A year or so
> into her recovered-memory therapy, Miller developed
> chronically aching joints and a low-grade fever. She could
> barely move, she was so fatigued. Months passed. Snow fell.
> Skies cleared. Miller knew she had to make a change. She
> had gone back to her memories for healing and wound up with
> a chronic disease. ''You know that saying 'It has to get
> worse before it gets better'?'' Miller says to me. ''Well,
> I used to believe that, but I don't anymore. That just
> leads you to fall apart. And you know the saying 'It's
> never too late to have a happy childhood'? Well, guess
> what? It is.''
>
> So she quit her Nancy Drew therapy. One day, she told her
> therapist, ''I'm not coming back anymore.'' Then what did
> she do? Among other things, she took up . . . tennis.
>
> Yes, tennis. Keep your eye on the ball, stay inside the
> bright white lines and hit hard. ''Tennis was so grounding
> and taught me so much grace and helped me to regulate my
> anxiety. It was tennis, not talk, that really helped.''
>
> Miller's own self-styled ''cure'' fueled her work as a
> clinician. She began to consider directing her clients away
> from their traumas and toward the parts of their lives that
> ''gave them more juice.'' She found that it worked. With
> trauma survivors, Miller now never begins a group session
> by asking, ''How are you feeling?'' ''Oh, my God, that
> would just be a disaster,'' she says. ''All I'd get was,
> 'Terrible, fearful, awful.' Instead I say, 'What strengths
> do you need to focus on today?''' In one session, Miller
> hands out paper dolls and bits of colored paper. Trauma
> survivors are told to glue the colored paper onto body
> parts that hurt or have been hurt, ''but then,'' Miller
> says, ''we don't stop there. We turn the dolls over, onto a
> fresh side, and participants use the same bits of paper to
> design a body of resilience.''
>
> Miller's form of psychotherapy emphasizes doing, not
> reflecting. The actions at once block and dilute memories.
> She, along with other colleagues, has started a trauma
> resource treatment center in western Massachusetts for
> low-income women and their children, predicated in part
> upon the virtues of repression. At the center, there is a
> kitchen full of utensils, so women can stir and chop
> instead of sitting and talking, a computer room where women
> can type up resumes and query letters and, maybe best of
> all, an attic full of professional clothes so if a job
> interview is landed, the woman can don a second skin, a
> sleek suit, a pair of pumps. It's exhilarating.
>
> Miller tells me: ''I worked with this woman named Karen,
> who said she was a sexual-abuse survivor and a
> schizophrenic. She had been in so much therapy and told her
> story so many times, and it reinforced her feelings of
> being sick. She'd been terribly infantilized by the mental
> health system, a system that tells women to recover by
> walking around clutching teddy bears and crying.'' Miller
> pauses. ''With this woman, we never asked her about her
> past. We saw it would be bad for her. Instead, we put her
> right on the computer. And then, when she'd learned the
> computer, we had her do some research work for us,
> interviewing. And it was incredible.'' Miller stares up at
> the ceiling, recalling. ''Karen did so well with the work
> we gave her. She learned to send e-mail, and that thrilled
> her.'' Consider this: teaching a schizophrenic sexual-abuse
> survivor how to press a button and hurl the self through
> space with cyber-specificity. Who wouldn't feel empowered?
>
> ''And then,'' Miller says, ''the feds came out to inspect
> our program like they do every year or two, and everyone
> had to go around the room and say, you know, like, 'Hi, I'm
> Dusty Miller, psychologist.' And when it was Karen's turn,
> instead of saying, 'Hi, I'm Karen, I'm a schizophrenic
> sexual-abuse survivor,' she said, 'Hi, I'm Karen, and I'm
> the lead ethnographer for the Franklin County Women and
> Violence Project.' I was so proud of her. We got her to
> stop telling her story, and she improved. There were tears
> in my eyes.''
>
> And today? Karen is feeling better several years later. She
> has earned enough money at her part-time job to buy a
> ''used used car,'' and she sings in a community chorus. ''I
> think she sings mostly peace songs,'' Miller tells me, and
> what are peace songs, really, but pleas and wishes,
> pictures of perfection, the wreckage wiped away. Karen,
> schizophrenic, sexually abused, rarely discusses her
> memories anymore; she looks to her future, not to her past.
> Who wouldn't be happy to hear that? And yet, who wouldn't
> worry as well? Will the trauma treatment of the future be
> something simplistically saccharine, down by the riverside,
> or maddeningly upbeat? Or will the trauma treatment of the
> future be done in small square rooms where no tears are
> allowed, where the ceiling is lidlike, the walls the color
> of clamp?
>
> Within the expression-versus-repression debate lurk
> ancient, essential questions and the oldest myths. In the
> fifth century B.C., Socrates claimed that an unexamined
> life was not worth living. Score one for the trauma teams.
> Around the same time, however, Sophocles described how a
> raging Oedipus, on a quest for knowledge, gouged out his
> own eyes when he finally learned the terrible truth; he
> would have been better off never asking. Score one for the
> Ginzburg findings. Who's to say which side is right, and
> when? There are times when a person would be better off
> diverted; just get a job, for God's sake, we want to say to
> the endless explorer who keeps reliving and revising the
> painful past. But then there are those folks with mouths as
> stern as minus signs, their faces like fists; they could>
> use a little expressive therapy, for sure. In the end, we
> may need to parse repression, nuance it, so that we
> understand it as a force with potentially healthful and
> unhealthful aspects. Freud once defined repression quite
> benignly as a refocusing of attention away from unpleasant
> ideas. Of course there are times, in an increasingly
> frantic world, when we need to do that; repression as
> filter, a screen to keep us clean. So turn away. But run
> away? Therein lies the litmus test.
>
> If you're breathless, knees knocking, and life is a pure
> sprint from some shadow, I say go back. Slow down. Dwell.
> As for the rest of us, let's do an experiment and measure
> the outcome. Let us fashion our lids; let us prop them
> proudly on top of our hurting heads.
>
>
>
>
> Lauren Slater is the author of ''Opening Skinner's Box:
> Great Psychological Experiments of the 20th Century,'' to
> be published by W.W. Norton in 2004.
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/23/magazine/23REPRESSION.html?ex=1047267139&ei=1&en=69a286a81bb56878
>
>
>
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July 2021, Week 3
July 2021, Week 2
July 2021, Week 1
June 2021, Week 4
June 2021, Week 3
June 2021, Week 2
June 2021, Week 1
May 2021, Week 4
April 2021, Week 4
April 2021, Week 2
March 2021, Week 4
March 2021, Week 2
March 2021, Week 1
February 2021, Week 4
February 2021, Week 2
February 2021, Week 1
January 2021, Week 4
January 2021, Week 3
January 2021, Week 2
January 2021, Week 1
December 2020, Week 5
December 2020, Week 4
December 2020, Week 3
December 2020, Week 2
December 2020, Week 1
November 2020, Week 3
November 2020, Week 2
November 2020, Week 1
October 2020, Week 4
October 2020, Week 3
October 2020, Week 1
September 2020, Week 3
September 2020, Week 1
August 2020, Week 4
August 2020, Week 3
July 2020, Week 4
July 2020, Week 3
July 2020, Week 2
July 2020, Week 1
June 2020, Week 4
June 2020, Week 3
June 2020, Week 2
June 2020, Week 1
May 2020, Week 5
May 2020, Week 4
May 2020, Week 2
April 2020, Week 3
April 2020, Week 1
March 2020, Week 4
January 2020, Week 4
January 2020, Week 3
January 2020, Week 2
December 2019, Week 4
December 2019, Week 3
December 2019, Week 1
November 2019, Week 4
November 2019, Week 2
November 2019, Week 1
October 2019, Week 5
October 2019, Week 4
October 2019, Week 3
October 2019, Week 2
September 2019, Week 3
August 2019, Week 4
August 2019, Week 2
August 2019, Week 1
July 2019, Week 4
July 2019, Week 2
June 2019, Week 3
June 2019, Week 2
May 2019, Week 3
May 2019, Week 2
May 2019, Week 1
April 2019, Week 5
April 2019, Week 4
April 2019, Week 3
March 2019, Week 4
March 2019, Week 3
March 2019, Week 2
March 2019, Week 1
February 2019, Week 4
February 2019, Week 3
February 2019, Week 2
February 2019, Week 1
January 2019, Week 3
December 2018, Week 3
November 2018, Week 4
November 2018, Week 3
November 2018, Week 2
November 2018, Week 1
October 2018, Week 5
October 2018, Week 4
October 2018, Week 3
October 2018, Week 2
October 2018, Week 1
September 2018, Week 4
September 2018, Week 3
September 2018, Week 2
September 2018, Week 1
August 2018, Week 5
August 2018, Week 4
August 2018, Week 3
August 2018, Week 2
August 2018, Week 1
July 2018, Week 4
July 2018, Week 3
July 2018, Week 2
July 2018, Week 1
June 2018, Week 4
June 2018, Week 3
June 2018, Week 2
June 2018, Week 1
May 2018, Week 3
May 2018, Week 2
May 2018, Week 1
April 2018, Week 4
April 2018, Week 3
April 2018, Week 2
March 2018, Week 4
March 2018, Week 3
March 2018, Week 1
February 2018, Week 4
February 2018, Week 2
January 2018, Week 4
January 2018, Week 3
December 2017, Week 4
December 2017, Week 3
December 2017, Week 2
December 2017, Week 1
November 2017, Week 5
November 2017, Week 4
November 2017, Week 3
November 2017, Week 2
October 2017, Week 5
October 2017, Week 4
October 2017, Week 3
October 2017, Week 2
October 2017, Week 1
September 2017, Week 3
September 2017, Week 1
August 2017, Week 4
August 2017, Week 3
August 2017, Week 2
August 2017, Week 1
July 2017, Week 3
July 2017, Week 2
July 2017, Week 1
June 2017, Week 5
June 2017, Week 4
June 2017, Week 3
June 2017, Week 2
June 2017, Week 1
May 2017, Week 5
May 2017, Week 4
May 2017, Week 3
May 2017, Week 2
May 2017, Week 1
April 2017, Week 5
April 2017, Week 4
April 2017, Week 3
April 2017, Week 2
April 2017, Week 1
March 2017, Week 5
March 2017, Week 4
March 2017, Week 3
March 2017, Week 2
March 2017, Week 1
February 2017, Week 4
February 2017, Week 3
February 2017, Week 2
February 2017, Week 1
January 2017, Week 5
January 2017, Week 4
January 2017, Week 3
January 2017, Week 2
January 2017, Week 1
December 2016, Week 5
December 2016, Week 4
December 2016, Week 3
December 2016, Week 2
December 2016, Week 1
November 2016, Week 5
November 2016, Week 3
November 2016, Week 2
November 2016, Week 1
October 2016, Week 5
October 2016, Week 4
October 2016, Week 2
October 2016, Week 1
September 2016, Week 5
September 2016, Week 4
September 2016, Week 3
September 2016, Week 2
September 2016, Week 1
August 2016, Week 5
August 2016, Week 4
August 2016, Week 3
August 2016, Week 2
August 2016, Week 1
July 2016, Week 4
July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 3
June 2016, Week 2
June 2016, Week 1
May 2016, Week 5
May 2016, Week 4
May 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 2
May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
April 2016, Week 4
April 2016, Week 3
April 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 5
March 2016, Week 4
March 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 1
February 2016, Week 5
February 2016, Week 4
February 2016, Week 3
February 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 4
January 2016, Week 3
January 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 2
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 4
November 2015, Week 3
November 2015, Week 2
November 2015, Week 1
October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
October 2015, Week 1
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 5
August 2015, Week 4
August 2015, Week 3
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 5
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 5
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 5
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
May 2015, Week 2
May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 3
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 5
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 2
February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 5
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
January 2015, Week 2
January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
December 2014, Week 2
December 2014, Week 1
November 2014, Week 4
November 2014, Week 3
November 2014, Week 2
November 2014, Week 1
October 2014, Week 4
October 2014, Week 3
October 2014, Week 2
October 2014, Week 1
September 2014, Week 5
September 2014, Week 4
September 2014, Week 3
September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 5
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
October 2004, Week 4
October 2004, Week 3
October 2004, Week 2
October 2004, Week 1
September 2004, Week 5
September 2004, Week 4
September 2004, Week 3
September 2004, Week 2
September 2004, Week 1
August 2004, Week 5
August 2004, Week 3
August 2004, Week 2
August 2004, Week 1
July 2004, Week 5
July 2004, Week 4
July 2004, Week 3
July 2004, Week 2
July 2004, Week 1
June 2004, Week 4
June 2004, Week 3
June 2004, Week 2
June 2004, Week 1
May 2004, Week 5
May 2004, Week 4
May 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 2
May 2004, Week 1
April 2004, Week 5
April 2004, Week 4
April 2004, Week 3
April 2004, Week 2
April 2004, Week 1
March 2004, Week 5
March 2004, Week 4
March 2004, Week 3
March 2004, Week 2
March 2004, Week 1
February 2004, Week 4
February 2004, Week 3
February 2004, Week 2
February 2004, Week 1
January 2004, Week 5
January 2004, Week 4
January 2004, Week 3
January 2004, Week 2
January 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 5
December 2003, Week 4
December 2003, Week 3
December 2003, Week 2
December 2003, Week 1
November 2003, Week 5
November 2003, Week 4
November 2003, Week 3
November 2003, Week 2
November 2003, Week 1
October 2003, Week 5
October 2003, Week 4
October 2003, Week 3
October 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 1
September 2003, Week 5
September 2003, Week 4
September 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 2
September 2003, Week 1
August 2003, Week 5
August 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
August 2003, Week 2
August 2003, Week 1
July 2003, Week 5
July 2003, Week 4
July 2003, Week 3
July 2003, Week 2
July 2003, Week 1
June 2003, Week 4
June 2003, Week 3
June 2003, Week 2
June 2003, Week 1
May 2003, Week 5
May 2003, Week 4
May 2003, Week 3
May 2003, Week 2
May 2003, Week 1
April 2003, Week 5
April 2003, Week 4
April 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 2
April 2003, Week 1
March 2003, Week 5
March 2003, Week 4
March 2003, Week 3
March 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 1
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 3
February 2003, Week 2
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 5
January 2003, Week 4
January 2003, Week 3
January 2003, Week 2
January 2003, Week 1
December 2002, Week 5
December 2002, Week 4
December 2002, Week 3
December 2002, Week 2
December 2002, Week 1
November 2002, Week 5
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
October 2002, Week 5
October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 2
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
December 2001, Week 5
December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
December 2001, Week 2
December 2001, Week 1
November 2001, Week 5
November 2001, Week 4
November 2001, Week 3
November 2001, Week 2
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 5
October 2001, Week 4
October 2001, Week 3
October 2001, Week 2
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 2
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 5
August 2001, Week 4
August 2001, Week 3
August 2001, Week 2
August 2001, Week 1
July 2001, Week 4
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 1
June 2001, Week 5
June 2001, Week 4
June 2001, Week 3
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
May 2001, Week 4
May 2001, Week 3
May 2001, Week 2
May 2001, Week 1
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 3
April 2001, Week 2
April 2001, Week 1
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 4
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 1
February 2001, Week 4
February 2001, Week 3
February 2001, Week 2
February 2001, Week 1
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
January 2001, Week 3
January 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 1
December 2000, Week 5
December 2000, Week 4
December 2000, Week 3
December 2000, Week 2
December 2000, Week 1
November 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
November 2000, Week 3
November 2000, Week 2
November 2000, Week 1
October 2000, Week 5
October 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 3
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 5
September 2000, Week 4
September 2000, Week 3
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 5
August 2000, Week 4
August 2000, Week 3
August 2000, Week 2
August 2000, Week 1
July 2000, Week 5
July 2000, Week 4
July 2000, Week 2
July 2000, Week 1
June 2000, Week 5
June 2000, Week 4
June 2000, Week 3
June 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 1
May 2000, Week 5
May 2000, Week 4
May 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 2
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
April 2000, Week 3
April 2000, Week 2
April 2000, Week 1
March 2000, Week 5
March 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 3
March 2000, Week 2
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 4
February 2000, Week 3
February 2000, Week 2
February 2000, Week 1
January 2000, Week 5
January 2000, Week 4
January 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
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July 1998, Week 1
June 1998, Week 5
June 1998, Week 4
June 1998, Week 3
June 1998, Week 2
June 1998, Week 1
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May 1998, Week 3
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May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
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April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
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January 1998, Week 3
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January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
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June 1997, Week 4

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