Skip repetitive navigational links
View: Next message | Previous More Hitsmessage
Next in topic | Previous More Hitsin topic
Next by same author | Previous More Hitsby same author
Previous page (September 2003) | Back to main LRNASST-L page
Join or leave LRNASST-L (or change settings)
Reply | Post a new message
Search
Log in
Options:   Chronologically | Most recent first
Proportional font | Non-proportional font

Subject:

From:

Norman Stahl <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 3 Sep 2003 17:57:09 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (112 lines)

Beloit College Releases 'Mind-Set List' for Class of 2007
By KELLIE BARTLETT


Most students entering college this fall were born in 1985. To help faculty
members understand and overcome the cultural-reference gap between those
students and themselves, Beloit College has released its sixth annual
"Mind-Set List."

The list helps counteract "hardening of the references," says Tom McBride,
a humanities professor at the college and co-editor of the list.

Following is this year's list:


1.      Ricky Nelson, Richard Burton, Samantha Smith, Laura Ashley, Orson
Welles, Karen Ann Quinlan, Benigno Aquino, and the U.S. Football League
have always been dead.
2.      They are not familiar with the source of that "giant sucking sound."
3.      Iraq has always been a problem.
4.      "Ctrl + Alt + Del" is as basic as "ABC."
5.      Paul Newman has always made salad dressing.
6.      Pete Rose has always been a gambler.
7.      Bert and Ernie are old enough to be their parents.
8.      An automatic is a weapon, not a transmission.
9.      Russian leaders have always looked like leaders everyplace else.
10.     The snail darter has never been endangered.
11.     There has always been a screening test for AIDS.
12.     Gas has always been unleaded.
13.     They never heard Howard Cosell call a game on ABC.
14.     The United States has always had a poet laureate.
15.     Garrison Keillor has always been live on public radio, and Lawrence
Welk has always been dead on public television.
16.     Their families drove SUV's without "being fuelish."
17.     There has always been some association between fried eggs and your
brain.
18.     They would never leave their calling card on someone's desk.
19.     They have never been able to find the "return" key.
20.     Computers have always fit in their backpacks.
21.     Datsuns have never been made.
22.     They have never gotten excited over a telegram, a long-distance
call, or a fax.
23.     The Osmonds are just talk-show hosts.
24.     Underclassmen who would be leaving college early have always been a
part of the NBA and NFL drafts.
25.     They have always "grazed" for food.
26.     Three-point shots from "downtown" have always been a part of
basketball.
27.     Test-tube babies are now having their own babies.
28.     Stores have always had scanners at the checkout.
29.     The Army has always driven Humvees.
30.     Adam and PC Junior computers had vanished from the market before
this generation went online.
31.     The Statue of Liberty has always had a gleaming torch.
32.     They have always had a personal-identification number.
33.     Banana Republic has always been a store, not a puppet government in
Latin America.
34.     Car detailing has always been available.
35.     Directory assistance has never been free.
36.     The Jaycees have always welcomed women as members.
37.     There has always been Lean Cuisine.
38.     They have always been able to fly Virgin Atlantic.
39.     There have never been dress codes in restaurants.
40.     Doctors have always had to deal with "reasonable and customary
fees," and patients have always had controls placed on the number of days
they could stay in a hospital.
41.     They have always been able to make photocopies at home.
42.     Michael Eisner has always been in charge of Disney.
43.     They have always been able to make telephone calls from airplanes.
44.     Yuppies are almost as old as hippies.
45.     Rupert Murdoch has always been an American citizen.
46.     Strawberry Fields has always been in New York.
47.     Rock 'n' roll has always been a force for social good.
48.     Killer bees have always been swarming in the United States.
49.     They have never seen a first lady in a fur coat.
50.     Don Imus has always been offending someone in his national audience.

Beloit also issued a short list that describes, from the entering students'
perspective, what sets them apart from most of their instructors:


1.      For many of them today, it's all about the "bling bling."
2.      They know who the "heroes in a half-shell" are.
3.      Peeps are not a candy; they are your friends.
4.      They have been "dissing" and "burning" things all their lives.
5.      They can expect to get a ticket for "ricing out their wheels."
6.      They knew how to pop a Popple and trade a Pog.
7.      They can still sing the rap chorus to the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
and the theme song from Duck Tales.



Norman A. Stahl
Professor and Chair
Literacy Education
GA 147
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115

Phone: (815) 753-9032
FAX:   (815) 753-8563
[log in to unmask]

To unsubscribe,send a message to [log in to unmask]
In body type: SIGNOFF LRNASST-L

To access LRNASST-L archives,point your web browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To subscribe, send email to [log in to unmask]
Leave subject blank.In body type: subscribe LRNASST-L

To contact list owner,email [log in to unmask]

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
January 2011
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
January 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.UFL.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager