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PSYART  March 2006, Week 3

PSYART March 2006, Week 3

Subject:

FW: FW: FW: FW: Scientifc theory and facts

From:

Murray Schwartz <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Discussion Group for Psychology and the Arts <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 15 Mar 2006 15:13:45 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (210 lines)

From:	J. R. Raper [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Subject:	Re: FW: FW: FW: Scientifc theory and  facts

Thomas,

Sorry about the viruses.  My address is all lower case.  How does one stop a hijacked address? contact the server perhaps?  I have sent no attachments your way.

Minds run faster than fingers or eyes, it seems.  The finger's lag creates the typo, the eye's lag causes the mind to leap over it.  Spell-check catches some but not all.

One of the great (and inadvertent?) gifts of Darwin was to spell the end of Plato's "species" thinking and place the emphasis on "varieties" and individuals.  Species apparently only exist as constructs of taxonomists and are generalized from the variations found in nature.  Perhaps Plato wasn't totally "wrong" that we know "ideas" rather than things, only in where the ideas come from and their ontological significance.  The so-called "world of ideas" seems to have been his projection and metaphor for what minds and writings contain.

I must rely on you and others to tell the quantum tale, though I like to read many versions of it.  Where and what are the classes you teach?

Jack
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Thomas Le 
  To: [log in to unmask] 
  Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2006 7:39 PM
  Subject: Re: FW: FW: FW: Scientifc theory and facts


  Jack,

  Sorry for the misspelling of "resuscitating" in my last post.  What do you call this lapse?  You know how to spell the word, but when you type it, it comes out differently.  I just started another semester today, and the students are a great bunch.

  Before going further, let me tell you a situation.  Two days in a row, I received two e-mails with attachments from "Jrraper" using your exact e-mail address.  I suspect these are not yours, because the e-mails do not have any meaningful messages and do not address me in person, and the attachments have been flagged by Yahoo as containing viruses.  Clearly someone has maliciously hijacked your e-mail address. I thought you might want to know.

  Now about Plato's theory of ideas you raised.  He contends that the things that we perceive are just particulars, mere appearances of 'ideas,' which make up reality.  Ideas are created by God,.and are eternal and timeless ! ; Only of ideas can one speak of knowledge whereas with particulars one can only have opinions.  Knowledge is thus infallible, and opinions fallible. A dog  is a particular instance of the idea of 'dog,' which is the ideal dog.  All dogs are imperfect and  partake of the 'dogness' of 'the dog'.    What is good partakes of 'goodness'.  And so on.  But by partaking of 'goodness' something good becomes similar to 'goodness' and so there  is a need for another 'idea' of goodness of
  which both partake, an infinite regress.  Thus an idea is just another particular.  And hence a particular is also part of reality. Again 'ideas' cannot have been  created by God if they are timeless, for timeless things are not created.  They just exist.  Now I understand why you have been irritated with Plato.  Yet Plato's influence persists into the modern world. The utopia he expounded in  the "Republic" resonated with ! Nietsche and was practiced in part by the Nazis.

  I agree with you they we are still a long way from reaching the core of the onion; but we keep plodding along as if driven by some invisible force.  In the meantime, since you teach stories, I am sure you can find fertile ground in quantum physics, which has uncovered so many weird and counterintuitive things.

  Best to your creativity.

  Thomas

  Murray Schwartz <[log in to unmask]> wrote:



    From: J. R. Raper [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
    Subject: Re: FW: FW: Scientifc theory and facts


    Thomas,
    Sorry for the tardiness of a reply to your challenging points. Here is the response I promised.

    By the wrap-around core of the much-examined onion, I had in mind nothing more depressing or Grail-like than the usual limitations of h! uman observation and imagination, the evasive pour-soi that always takes up a new position whenever one directs one's attention (consciousness, pour-soi) upon it. Until we comprehend that observer completely, we cannot be certain whether what it observes is in the thing-itself (call it en-soi or call it simply pragma) or in the observer. We all understand how ideology, faith, theory occlude observation, and we know that the senses, even those augmented by microscopes, telescopes, and similar technologies, are severely limited. It is instructive enough that my pets hear and smell things I have little inkling of, but to what do birds and spiny lobsters respond when they make their pilgrimages? What do earthworms know? Even our most refined observations have their built-in limitations. Therefore, even our most careful hypotheses are, at s!
    ome level, still imperfect. No need to fear the challenge of knowing will be vanquished soon. After years of being irritated with Pl! ato for positing his otherworld of ideas and believing that was reality (imagine the damage that dualism has caused!), I sometimes wonder if his "theory" was his hypothesis to explain the way that ultimately we are stuck with our stories, our "ideas of," things, not the things themselves. Even if we cease chasing things in themselves, we can still follow Zeus and pursue the mystery of the Other, for whom woman has so often been the symbol in western male consciousness. Lots of books remain to be written about that recurring challenge--and from both sides.

    I have not deliberately challenged the "story" of gravity since I was four and tried to enter another story by becoming Captain Marvel. I do accord such theories or laws, including Darwin's, the respect they deserve, believe me. But, as a post-academic professor of stories, I cherish new stories, including those based on the observations and measurements that seem in some small way to support the existence of anti-gr! avity. By all means, push back the sphere of darkness, but be prepared for new darknesses, and, as you say, revel in them. Let's hope the further darknesses are ontological and epistemological rather than ethical and behavioral.

    And if the nuclear fuel of the stars nears exhaustion, the odds are some future leader will promise us additional alternative energies. Promises, of course, are unproved hypotheses (refer to opening sentences please).

    Cheers,
    Jack





    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: Thomas Le 
    To: [log in to unmask] 
    Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2006 1:23 PM
    Subject: Re: FW: FW: Scientifc theory and facts

    Jack, 

    First a correction from my previous post. The electron is an elementary particle, not made up of quarks.

    With the question, "Is it possible that as one peels the onion one eventually comes to a core that extends outward to wra! p around itself and the entire onion? ", you opened a can of worms. I was expecting the time when we get to the core will be the end of it all, since when all reality (physical, mental, psychological, etc.) is known, there isn't anything else to look forward to. Life would be totally meaningless; there would be no more puzzles, no more searches. Einstein, 
    Freud, Jung, Faulkner, Nietsche, Sartre, Derrida, and the rest will have served their purposes and forgotten. But you imply that when we get to the bottom, what we find is a new reality, a new onion, recursively. Are we then fated to be constantly in quest of the Holy Grail? I at once shudder and revel at the prospect of the constant search. But then I recall Sisyphus, who in Tartarus 
    never stopped rolling the rock uphill, which once at the top rolled down to the plain. Imagine Sisyphus' state of mind on his way down to begin his thankless task anew. Head bent, body tired, mind fuzzy, he must represent a sorr! y fate, for having conquered Death once. At least he was condemned by Zeus, that peerless womanizer whose justice leaves to be desired. But we, we haven't conquered death, are we condemned too? For what? By whom? Why do we have to endlessly search for truth?

    Before tackling another of your thoughts, let me quickly shed a little light on this issue your raised. "Isn't it true that a dozen or so years ago the "law" of gravity was being revised to include a law of anti-gravity, which revision challenges one of the most cherished scientific stories?" The law of gravity is real enough, for we all know what happens when someone (other than Daedalu! s) jumps out of a window of a tall building. Anti-gravity was posited by Einstein after his equations of general relativity (formulated in 1915) predicted an expanding universe. At a time when the steady-state universe seemed to dominate, even Einstein had to bow to tradition by saying, "God does not play dice with the universe,! " and introducing a fudge factor, known as the cosmological constant (or anti-gravity) to keep the universe from expanding. After Hubble showed the universe was expanding, Einstein admitted the cosmological constant was the "biggest blunder of my life." Now som!
    e physicists are recussitating his anti-gravity factor. And so the world merrily goes round.

    Now about another of your provocative thoughts, "I wonder if science sometimes creates the same confusion between things in themselves and our stories about those things." By the "things in themselves" you must be referring to Sartre's "en-soi" (being-in-itself) or what! I would call reality, and by "our stories about them" I take it to refer roughly to Sartre's "pour-soi" (being-for-itself), for the pour-soi is our consciousness, which is at the root of our ability to explore and 
    comprehend reality. Science, as well as human endeavors in all disciplines, is like a point of light pushing back the sphere ! of darkness that envelopes us, allowing us to see the being-in-itself more clearly. What scientists find or think they find about reality, they give it a name and construct a hypothesis about it. Other workers will put the hypothesis to a test. If the test results support 
    the hypothesis, a theory is born. Some practical minds will put the theory to practical use. Thus although no one has seen an atom, a photon or an electron, its properties can be measured and studied. As a result, applications of this knowledge are commonplace in daily life: nuclear power, X-rays, laser, carbon dating,, smoke detectors, h! olograms, transmission electron micrography (TEM), 
    scanning tunneling micrography (STM), computerized axial tomography (CAT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and more. However, like everything else human, science is not infallible. It is subject to error. And so our "stories about things" will change as the sphere of! light pushes back the envelope of darkness. The important thing is to keep 
    this light going and expanding, or else we might just die in ice, as one of the hypotheses about the fate of the universe predicts. This fate overtakes us when all the nuclear fuel in stars is spent in the physical sense or when all the spark of our inquisitive mind is extinguished in the metaphorical sense.

    Thomas

    Murray Schwartz wrote: 



    F! rom: J. R. Raper [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
    Subject: Re: FW: Scientifc theory and facts

    Thomas,
    Thanks again for bringing me up to date on aspects of physics. 

    It is the creative imagination of science that I have had in mind all along. 

    Is it possible that as one peels the onion one eventually comes to a core that extends outward to wrap around itself and the entire onion? If so, the core, to de-mystify that metaphor, is the imagination! that has comprehended each layer as it was peeled. For that reason, we use increasingly whimsical terms--quantum, quarks, flavors, charmed, colors, strings, curls--to designate those further reaches of the microcosm. Democritus, as I recall, made do with monads, which were largely physical, and with atoms (which cannot be cut, the Greeks thought). Certainly it is not onions that have not become more colorful since then, but our grasp of them.

    In modern literature, unlike most 19th c. lit, th! e present generally creates the past, in that present events not only bring the past ones to mind but also determine the way they are selected and constructed. Hence, the "flashback". (This is equally true in psychology, when present interactions trigger the transferences out of which much of the patient's past is reconstructed). Faulkner, as well as anyone, shows us both how the "past" determines the "present" (the 19th c. view) and how present needs determine the construction of ! the past (a 20th c. view). Both relationships are powerfully dramatized in Faulkner's ABSALOM! 

    The notion that the future creates the present is as old as religion itself, in which imagined futures (damnation/eternal life, several dozen virgins in paradise, the Messiah, etc.) eclipse the reality of the present in determining the construction of the next moment of the present. A more sanguine vision of the future determining the present occurs in the first novella of John Barth's wonde! rful "novel," CHIMERA. 

    In "histories," there are two temporal dimensions at work that often become confused. There are the events themselves (in some past) and the things observed, said or written about the events (in some present). Both are called "history". But they are very different. Histories as stories are created oftentimes to serve a need of the present or a specific program for the future (these are the "lies agreed upon"). The events themselves simply were, if onl! y we could peel the onions carefully enough to rediscover them where they are lost. I wonder if science sometimes creates the same confusion between things in themselves and our stories about those things. Isn't it true that a dozen or so years ago the "law" of gravity was being revised to include a law of anti-gravity, which revision challenges one of the most cherished scientific stories?

    What is common in all these dimensions of time and matter is the imagination at work construc! ting, questioning, reconstructing past, present, future, and the physical universe itself (don't you admire the Hubble)--until we establish versions that, to quote Faulkner, are "probably true enough." With these approximations, we, to quote Le, "muddle through." At least the British seem to. Not sure about my compatriots, who "believe" they know things absolutely. (They are finding they must distinguish information from knowledge, knowledge from intelligence, intelligence from wisdom--! but this is a political digression, forgive me.)

    Jack (still)



    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: Thomas Le 
    To: [log in to unmask] 
    Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 4:00 PM
    Subject: Re: FW: Scientifc theory and facts

    John,

    Thanks for your response. Let me follow your arguments in this post.

    1. Your "relatively simple questions about alternative dimensions of past and present" ar! e not at all simple, to me. In fact, they touch
    upon a more profound issue of "alternative dimensions," which raises the question of more than one dimension of past and present,
    which raises the question of relation between past and present, which extrapolates to the relation between future and present (the
    present being the past to the future). Some physicists are musing about just such questions. Here is a sample: How does the present
    determine the past? How does the future dete! rmine the present? In other words, how does the effect determine the cause? The term
    "determining" implies there exist several alternatives, from which one is chosen (determined), which in turn implies the alternatives
    must exist simultaneously. Fr! om this it follows that past and present.must exist simultaneously. One quantum physics experiment should 
    shed light on the issue. Consider a slightly modified version of the double slit experiment. A source of light ! emits one photon toward
    an opaque screen containing two slits. A long distance away a light-sensitive film emulsion screen is set up in the path of the photon.
    The screen can rotate up and down by an experiementer. Beyond the film screen stand two telescopes, one aligned to 
    catch the photon coming through the upper slit, the other to detect the photon coming through the lower slit. When the photon is emitted,
    it passes through the upper slit or the lower one or BOTH slits at the s! ame time on its way to the telescopes. Here is the experiment.
    An emitted photon has just passed through the double slits. The experimenter can immediately decide whether to leave the screen down,
    or rotate it up. If the sc! reen is down, the photon continues its journey unimpeded to the telescopes. It the photon is detected by the 
    upper telescope it must have passed through the upper slit, and if it hits the lower telescope it must have passed through the lower sl! it. 
    In either case, the photon must have acted as a particle. If the screen is up, the photon creates an interference pattern on the screen. In 
    this case, it must have acted as a wave. Note that the experimenter's decision whether or not to rotate the screen up FOLLOWS the passage 
    of the photon through the double slits. Yet it is this subsequent decision that determines whether the photon behaved as a particle or as a 
    wave! In other words, a later act determines the past of ! the photon. This may not be so weird if you recall that history is written bv the 
    victors, who pick and choose what they want the past to be! Thus the past is not so hard and fast or set in stone.

    On the question of dark matter, no one knows exactly what it is yet. It is inferred from the fact that visible matter is only 10% 
    of the total matter of the universe. Is its existence replicated in a parallel universe? Yes and no. Note that parallel universes
    ! may be similar to ours in that they obey the same physical laws as ours, or may be very different in that they have totally different initial
    conditions and obey different physical laws.

    2. I believe "psychological reality" exists in our brain.

    3. Perhaps my statement to the effect that I wouldn't lose sleep over the external world is too unqualified and too strong. What I should
    have said is the external world is there for our investigation till doomsday (u! nless we blow one another into smithereens before that). 
    If we err in our attempts to comprehend it, there usually is another chance to try again. While we cannot trust our senses, we d! evise tools 
    to offset their inadequacies and extend their capabilities I visualize our probes of the internal and external universes as similar to peeling 
    an onion. Layer after layer we are getting closer and closer to reality. I would worry less about the external world than about the other-minds
    world because if we make progress faster with the first, the same cannot be said of the second. For if I am not certain about my own mind, 
    how can I be comfortable with "vicarious introspection" to probe another person's mind. What about the schizophrenics, who have 
    hallucinations, hear voices, and lose touch with "reality"? To them what they describe in their experience was real, the voices were real, 
    and they never lost touch with reality, their reality. We! can neither penetrate their minds nor replicate their conditions. As you said, I would 
    have to settle for an approximation, which hopefully is capable of being refined ! and sharpened over time. In this domain of other minds, I 
    hope progress in biological psychology, augmented by progress in the physical sciences, will help in the long run. When we know more 
    about our brain, the master tool that makes all our other tools with which we explore and probe the ext! ernal world as well as itself, many of 
    the issues with the other minds may be clarified. Until then, we'll just have to muddle through.

    4. When I say, "the aggregate of personalities exists simultaneously," the statement is consistent with the concept of parallel universes. Recall
    Schroedinger's cat and its "dead" quantum state existing side by side its "live" quantum state at the same time. If we did not posit parallel
    universes, we would have to accept some weird pos! sibility of half-dead, half-alive quantum states existing sequentially (?), which somehow 
    resolve into one state (dead or alive) at observation. In ! the case of split personalities (or multiple personalities), instead of thinking of them
    as linear (sequential) histories, why can't we visualize Fred and Alice all existing independently at the same time in Mark, each in his or her 
    own universe, lived one at time? This assertion is consistent with what was discussed in! item 1 with respect to time and with my previous
    posts. The entire history of each personality exists because the past and present constantly communicate. Likewise, if you extrapolate, 
    the presesnt and the future also communicate and the history of each personality stretches all the way from the past to the future. Does
    each personality interfere with the others? Yes, they constantly do. But like the forking alternatives we saw in a previous post, only one 
    branch is taken a! t a time, and that selection determines what we observe.

    5. Finally about your literary mode of knowing and the world of fiction.&nbs! p; There is nothing more honest in admitting up front that the work
    is "fiction." This admission insulates the writer and reader from charges of dissimulation. But as any reader knows, fiction alone does
    not have any traction unless that fiction has resonance in her heart and mind. So your fiction is really a reflection of real! ity, in the
    unpretentious guise of creative imagination. 

    Do you know what, John? Creative imagination is not the exclusive attribute of literature, it is used by scientists as well. Recall the peeling 
    of the onion. First (way back to Democritus) there was the concept of the atom, the smallest, indivisible bit of matter . When 
    electromagnetism came along, the atom turned out to have internal structure. Scientists came up with protons, neutrons, electrons. It wasn't ! 
    long before they peeled another layer and found the quarks, which exist only in combinations to form protons, neutrons, el! ectrons. Then the 
    quarks are found to have "flavors": up, down, top, bottom, strange, charmed. Then they have "colors": red, green, blue. The end? Not yet. 
    Now the microworld is made up of strings and the universe has 11 dimensions, seven of which are "curled" leaving only the four dimensions 
    of spacetime, as we know them now. And so on ! ad infinitum. If that is not creative imagination, then I don't understand the term.

    Thomas

    Murray Schwartz wrote: 



    From: J. R. Raper [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
    Subject: Re: Scientifc theory and facts

    Thomas Le,
    Thanks for your very complex response to my relatively simple questions about alternative dimensions of past and present. 

    Because my formal training in physics ended long before ! my literary t! raining, I confess that I followed your path through the thick forest of quantum theory like one groping his way through a dark room he visited years ago when it was lit. I take it there does exist as much statistical probability for alternate universes as there exists for "dark matter" in the known universe, for which dark matter there appears to be a fairly high probability. Are the three categories (antiparticles, dark matter, alternative universes) attempts to de! scribe the same potential phenomena?

    === message truncated ===




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September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
December 2006, Week 1
November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 5
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 3
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 5
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
August 2006, Week 5
August 2006, Week 4
August 2006, Week 3
August 2006, Week 2
August 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
July 2006, Week 2
July 2006, Week 1
June 2006, Week 5
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 3
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 5
April 2006, Week 4
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 5
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3
March 2006, Week 2
March 2006, Week 1
February 2006, Week 4
February 2006, Week 3
February 2006, Week 2
February 2006, Week 1
January 2006, Week 5
January 2006, Week 4
January 2006, Week 3
January 2006, Week 2
January 2006, Week 1
December 2005, Week 5
December 2005, Week 3
December 2005, Week 2
December 2005, Week 1
November 2005, Week 5
November 2005, Week 4
November 2005, Week 3
November 2005, Week 2
November 2005, Week 1
October 2005, Week 5
October 2005, Week 4
October 2005, Week 3
October 2005, Week 2
October 2005, Week 1
September 2005, Week 5
September 2005, Week 4
September 2005, Week 3
September 2005, Week 2
September 2005, Week 1
August 2005, Week 5
August 2005, Week 4
August 2005, Week 3
August 2005, Week 2
August 2005, Week 1
July 2005, Week 5
July 2005, Week 4
July 2005, Week 3
July 2005, Week 2
July 2005, Week 1
June 2005, Week 4
June 2005, Week 3
June 2005, Week 2
June 2005, Week 1
May 2005, Week 4
May 2005, Week 3
May 2005, Week 2
May 2005, Week 1
April 2005, Week 5
April 2005, Week 4
April 2005, Week 3
April 2005, Week 2
April 2005, Week 1
March 2005, Week 5
March 2005, Week 4
March 2005, Week 3
March 2005, Week 2
March 2005, Week 1
February 2005, Week 4
February 2005, Week 3
February 2005, Week 2
February 2005, Week 1
January 2005, Week 5
January 2005, Week 4
January 2005, Week 3
January 2005, Week 2
January 2005, Week 1
December 2004, Week 5
December 2004, Week 4
December 2004, Week 3
December 2004, Week 2
December 2004, Week 1
November 2004, Week 5
November 2004, Week 4
November 2004, Week 3
November 2004, Week 2
November 2004, Week 1
October 2004, Week 5
October 2004, Week 4
October 2004, Week 3
October 2004, Week 2
October 2004, Week 1
September 2004, Week 5
September 2004, Week 4
September 2004, Week 3
September 2004, Week 2
September 2004, Week 1
August 2004, Week 5
August 2004, Week 3
August 2004, Week 2
August 2004, Week 1
July 2004, Week 5
July 2004, Week 4
July 2004, Week 3
July 2004, Week 2
July 2004, Week 1
June 2004, Week 4
June 2004, Week 3
June 2004, Week 2
June 2004, Week 1
May 2004, Week 5
May 2004, Week 4
May 2004, Week 3
May 2004, Week 2
May 2004, Week 1
April 2004, Week 5
April 2004, Week 4
April 2004, Week 3
April 2004, Week 2
April 2004, Week 1
March 2004, Week 5
March 2004, Week 4
March 2004, Week 3
March 2004, Week 2
March 2004, Week 1
February 2004, Week 4
February 2004, Week 3
February 2004, Week 2
February 2004, Week 1
January 2004, Week 5
January 2004, Week 4
January 2004, Week 3
January 2004, Week 2
January 2004, Week 1
December 2003, Week 5
December 2003, Week 4
December 2003, Week 3
December 2003, Week 2
December 2003, Week 1
November 2003, Week 5
November 2003, Week 4
November 2003, Week 3
November 2003, Week 2
November 2003, Week 1
October 2003, Week 5
October 2003, Week 4
October 2003, Week 3
October 2003, Week 2
October 2003, Week 1
September 2003, Week 5
September 2003, Week 4
September 2003, Week 3
September 2003, Week 2
September 2003, Week 1
August 2003, Week 5
August 2003, Week 4
August 2003, Week 3
August 2003, Week 2
August 2003, Week 1
July 2003, Week 5
July 2003, Week 4
July 2003, Week 3
July 2003, Week 2
July 2003, Week 1
June 2003, Week 4
June 2003, Week 3
June 2003, Week 2
June 2003, Week 1
May 2003, Week 5
May 2003, Week 4
May 2003, Week 3
May 2003, Week 2
May 2003, Week 1
April 2003, Week 5
April 2003, Week 4
April 2003, Week 3
April 2003, Week 2
April 2003, Week 1
March 2003, Week 5
March 2003, Week 4
March 2003, Week 3
March 2003, Week 2
March 2003, Week 1
February 2003, Week 4
February 2003, Week 3
February 2003, Week 2
February 2003, Week 1
January 2003, Week 5
January 2003, Week 4
January 2003, Week 3
January 2003, Week 2
January 2003, Week 1
December 2002, Week 5
December 2002, Week 4
December 2002, Week 3
December 2002, Week 2
December 2002, Week 1
November 2002, Week 5
November 2002, Week 4
November 2002, Week 3
November 2002, Week 2
November 2002, Week 1
October 2002, Week 5
October 2002, Week 4
October 2002, Week 3
October 2002, Week 2
October 2002, Week 1
September 2002, Week 5
September 2002, Week 4
September 2002, Week 3
September 2002, Week 2
September 2002, Week 1
August 2002, Week 5
August 2002, Week 4
August 2002, Week 3
August 2002, Week 2
August 2002, Week 1
July 2002, Week 5
July 2002, Week 4
July 2002, Week 3
July 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 4
June 2002, Week 3
June 2002, Week 2
June 2002, Week 1
May 2002, Week 5
May 2002, Week 4
May 2002, Week 3
May 2002, Week 2
May 2002, Week 1
April 2002, Week 5
April 2002, Week 4
April 2002, Week 3
April 2002, Week 2
April 2002, Week 1
March 2002, Week 5
March 2002, Week 4
March 2002, Week 3
March 2002, Week 2
March 2002, Week 1
February 2002, Week 4
February 2002, Week 3
February 2002, Week 2
February 2002, Week 1
January 2002, Week 5
January 2002, Week 4
January 2002, Week 3
January 2002, Week 2
January 2002, Week 1
December 2001, Week 5
December 2001, Week 4
December 2001, Week 3
December 2001, Week 2
December 2001, Week 1
November 2001, Week 5
November 2001, Week 4
November 2001, Week 3
November 2001, Week 2
November 2001, Week 1
October 2001, Week 5
October 2001, Week 4
October 2001, Week 3
October 2001, Week 2
October 2001, Week 1
September 2001, Week 5
September 2001, Week 4
September 2001, Week 3
September 2001, Week 2
September 2001, Week 1
August 2001, Week 5
August 2001, Week 4
August 2001, Week 3
August 2001, Week 2
August 2001, Week 1
July 2001, Week 4
July 2001, Week 3
July 2001, Week 2
July 2001, Week 1
June 2001, Week 5
June 2001, Week 4
June 2001, Week 3
June 2001, Week 2
June 2001, Week 1
May 2001, Week 5
May 2001, Week 4
May 2001, Week 3
May 2001, Week 2
May 2001, Week 1
April 2001, Week 5
April 2001, Week 4
April 2001, Week 3
April 2001, Week 2
April 2001, Week 1
March 2001, Week 5
March 2001, Week 4
March 2001, Week 3
March 2001, Week 2
March 2001, Week 1
February 2001, Week 4
February 2001, Week 3
February 2001, Week 2
February 2001, Week 1
January 2001, Week 5
January 2001, Week 4
January 2001, Week 3
January 2001, Week 2
January 2001, Week 1
December 2000, Week 5
December 2000, Week 4
December 2000, Week 3
December 2000, Week 2
December 2000, Week 1
November 2000, Week 5
November 2000, Week 4
November 2000, Week 3
November 2000, Week 2
November 2000, Week 1
October 2000, Week 5
October 2000, Week 4
October 2000, Week 3
October 2000, Week 2
October 2000, Week 1
September 2000, Week 5
September 2000, Week 4
September 2000, Week 3
September 2000, Week 2
September 2000, Week 1
August 2000, Week 5
August 2000, Week 4
August 2000, Week 3
August 2000, Week 2
August 2000, Week 1
July 2000, Week 5
July 2000, Week 4
July 2000, Week 2
July 2000, Week 1
June 2000, Week 5
June 2000, Week 4
June 2000, Week 3
June 2000, Week 2
June 2000, Week 1
May 2000, Week 5
May 2000, Week 4
May 2000, Week 3
May 2000, Week 2
May 2000, Week 1
April 2000, Week 5
April 2000, Week 4
April 2000, Week 3
April 2000, Week 2
April 2000, Week 1
March 2000, Week 5
March 2000, Week 4
March 2000, Week 3
March 2000, Week 2
March 2000, Week 1
February 2000, Week 4
February 2000, Week 3
February 2000, Week 2
February 2000, Week 1
January 2000, Week 5
January 2000, Week 4
January 2000, Week 3
January 2000, Week 2
January 2000, Week 1
December 1999, Week 5
December 1999, Week 4
December 1999, Week 3
December 1999, Week 2
December 1999, Week 1
November 1999, Week 5
November 1999, Week 4
November 1999, Week 3
November 1999, Week 2
November 1999, Week 1
October 1999, Week 5
October 1999, Week 4
October 1999, Week 3
October 1999, Week 2
October 1999, Week 1
September 1999, Week 5
September 1999, Week 4
September 1999, Week 3
September 1999, Week 2
September 1999, Week 1
August 1999, Week 5
August 1999, Week 4
August 1999, Week 3
August 1999, Week 2
July 1999, Week 5
July 1999, Week 4
July 1999, Week 3
June 1999, Week 4
June 1999, Week 3
June 1999, Week 2
June 1999, Week 1
May 1999, Week 5
May 1999, Week 4
May 1999, Week 3
May 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 5
April 1999, Week 4
April 1999, Week 3
April 1999, Week 2
April 1999, Week 1
March 1999, Week 5
March 1999, Week 4
March 1999, Week 3
March 1999, Week 2
March 1999, Week 1
February 1999, Week 4
February 1999, Week 3
February 1999, Week 2
February 1999, Week 1
January 1999, Week 5
January 1999, Week 4
January 1999, Week 3
January 1999, Week 2
January 1999, Week 1
December 1998, Week 5
December 1998, Week 4
December 1998, Week 3
December 1998, Week 2
December 1998, Week 1
November 1998, Week 5
November 1998, Week 4
November 1998, Week 3
November 1998, Week 2
November 1998, Week 1
October 1998, Week 5
October 1998, Week 4
October 1998, Week 3
October 1998, Week 2
October 1998, Week 1
September 1998, Week 5
September 1998, Week 4
September 1998, Week 3
September 1998, Week 2
September 1998, Week 1
August 1998, Week 4
August 1998, Week 3
August 1998, Week 2
August 1998, Week 1
July 1998, Week 4
July 1998, Week 3
July 1998, Week 2
July 1998, Week 1
June 1998, Week 5
June 1998, Week 4
June 1998, Week 3
June 1998, Week 2
June 1998, Week 1
May 1998, Week 5
May 1998, Week 4
May 1998, Week 3
May 1998, Week 2
May 1998, Week 1
April 1998, Week 5
April 1998, Week 4
April 1998, Week 3
April 1998, Week 2
April 1998, Week 1
March 1998, Week 5
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March 1998, Week 1
February 1998, Week 4
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February 1998, Week 1
January 1998, Week 5
January 1998, Week 4
January 1998, Week 3
January 1998, Week 2
January 1998, Week 1
December 1997, Week 5
December 1997, Week 4
December 1997, Week 3
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December 1997, Week 1
November 1997, Week 4
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October 1997, Week 5
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August 1997, Week 3
August 1997, Week 2
August 1997, Week 1
July 1997, Week 4
July 1997, Week 3
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June 1997, Week 4

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