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BEST-L  January 2007

BEST-L January 2007

Subject:

Re: Inefficient, dirty energy and transportation systems are now the norm. This must end

From:

Steve Humphrey <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Steve Humphrey <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 26 Jan 2007 11:14:53 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (263 lines)

Based on my experience on the Florida Environmental Regulation Commission, I
completely agree with Dave: the key to effective environmental policy is
performance-based standards.   It sets the aspirational goal of achieving
the best that can be done, avoids prejudging who should win, and leaves the
actors to invent and decide the means.  Thus contending approaches and
technologies all have a chance to prove that they are best. 

(I still expect to be driving an 80 mpg Honda by late 2008, and I expect to
have to wait longer for cleaner technology.)


Dr. Stephen R. Humphrey, Director of Academic Programs, 
School of Natural Resources and Environment, 
Box 116455, 103 Black Hall, University of Florida 
Gainesville, FL  32611-6455  USA 
Tel. 352-392-9230, Fax 352-392-9748 
http://snre.ufl.edu 


-----Original Message-----
From: Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology Society
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of bruderly
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2007 11:05 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Inefficient, dirty energy and transportation systems are now the
norm. This must end

As Dr. Steve Humphrey points out diesel engines can be very efficient, but
..... The problem with diesel engines has been that these highly efficient
diesel engines have NOT been clean enough to adequately protect human
health. Two reasons: 1) chemicals in the fuel, such as carbon and sulfur,
create products of incomplete combustion and 2) the engines require exhaust
after treatment, ie particulate traps and catalytic converters, to meet
emissions standards that are more protective of human health.

 

The recent introduction of low sulfur fuel (15 ppm) and the growing
popularity of Biodiesel are promising developments, but not enough. The
diesel engine industry is currently re-inventing itself in response to the
low sulfur fuel and hoping that they can delay installation of  exhaust
after treatment because after treatment results in a loss of efficiency,
less power and higher costs.

 

Internal combustion engines using hydrogen fuels operate at 34% brake
thermal efficiency and engineers at BMW, Daimler and Ford think they can
boost BTE of hydrogen fueled ICEs to 50%.

 

Low sulfur diesel, Fisher-Tropse diesel, Ethanol, Biodiesel, CNG, LNG,
hydrogen, battery electric, plug-in hybrids, bicycles, fuel cells and higher
efficiency ICEs all have a role to play in solving our oil addiction problem
- there are many, many niche markets that are suited to one or more of these
energy / transportation systems.

 

Federal, state and local policy and funding for RDD&D is needed to motivate
manufacturers and consumers to convert to mass production and use of these
ultra-clean fuels and highly efficient vehicles in 2007, not 2020, but NOW.
Unfortunately, that is NOT happening.

 

Why? Because "experts" and academics who really understand the problem spend
too much time and effort pushing their pet technology fix and attacking
competitors. The result is political paralysis as the politicians get so
much conflicting information they end up doing little or nothing or throwing
support to the industry group that makes the most noise and has the best
public relations consultants.

 

I urge experts, academics and those with passion about sustainability to
join together to advocate tough performance-based policy standards that will
create market demand for engines and fuels that are ultra-efficient and with
near-zero emissions.

 

I urge all of you to write grant applications and proposals for your pet
technology and research interest. But at the same time I urge you to become
advocates for performance-based standards (ie lowest emissions and maximum
efficiency possible for every fuel and technology combination). Now is the
time to put intense pressure on policymakers at all levels of government and
business to enact standards that require use of the cleanest, safest, most
efficient energy and transportation systems possible.

 

Inefficient, dirty energy and transportation systems are now the norm.
Inefficient, dirty energy and transportation systems must become the
exception to the standard, not the norm.

 



 

David E. Bruderly, PE

Bruderly Engineering Associates, Inc.

920 SW 57th Drive

Gainesville, Florida 32607-3838

352-377-0932

www.cleanpowerengineering.com <http://www.cleanpowerengineering.com/> 

www.bruderly.com <http://www.bruderly.com/> 

 

Hi:  For some time, I've been convinced that the best opportunity for
greatly increasing efficiency of the US auto fleet lies in high-efficiency
diesel engines.  HED and hybrid technologies are current technologies each
with a 30% affiance gain, which means we could couple these technologies NOW
in a powerful car getting 80 mpg.  Doing so requires the production of and
distribution infrastructure for ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, which finally
has been mandated by Congress and is now being phased in via the freight
trucking industry.  HED auto engines already are marketed in other countries
by Honda, BMW, and Daimler, but none are coupled with hybrid tech; this may
change soon.  In the US, though, auto manufacturers are betting instead on
ethanol, hoping for fuel volumes that greatly exceed the volume producible
even if the entire US corn supply is converted to ethanol (no food!).  While
our leaders sort this out, look for HED truck engines coming from
Caterpillar, Cummins, and PACCAR.  I'll bet that Honda shows us how to untie
this knot.

 

See below for a bit of the insight.  If you want to follow these
developments, I suggest you set a Google Alert for "high efficiency diesel".

 

Dr. Stephen R. Humphrey, Director of Academic Programs, School of Natural
Resources and Environment, Box 116455, 103 Black Hall, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL  32611-6455  USA Tel. 352-392-9230, Fax 352-392-9748
<http://snre.ufl.edu/> http://snre.ufl.edu <http://snre.ufl.edu/>  

 

 

from the Monterey County Herald

 

Hybrids get $17 million boost

 

Energy department grants funds for development of ethanol, battery
technology for plug-in vehicles

 

 

By SHOLNN FREEMAN

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy on Tuesday announced $17 million
in grants to support the development of battery technology for plug-in
hybrid vehicles and ethanol, two areas in the energy debate where officials
in Washington and Detroit are closely aligned.

 

The money will be offered as two separate solicitation grants, one for $14
million for the plug-in technology and another $3 million for ethanol. The
money for battery development aims to improve the technology's performance.

The $3 million grants will support engineering advances to improve the E85
flex-fuel blend.

 

Alexander Karsner, the Energy department's assistant secretary for energy
efficiency and renewable energy, made the announcement at the press preview
day of the Washington Auto Show. He used high-tech cars from General Motors
Corp., Ford Motor Co. and DaimlerChrysler AG as his backdrop.

 

Detroit automakers have asked the Bush administration for hundreds of
millions of dollars to help kick off hybrid cars. They say they need
government support to complete research and development into lithium-ion
battery technology, a crucial component in bringing the cars to the market.

Detroit auto executives, who are building millions of ethanol capable
vehicles, have pressed the government to encourage a significant expansion
of ethanol fueling stations.

 

Officials from foreign automakers are stepping up complaints that U.S.

government policy is unfairly backing ethanol and plug-ins at the expense of
diesels and traditional gas-electric hybrids, such as the Prius from Toyota
Motor Corp. Toyota is pushing for the continuation of federal incentives for
the cars. Diesel-engine makers and European automakers such as BWM AG and
DaimlerChrysler AG are asking for more federal support for diesel
technology.

 

Dieter Zetsche, chairman of DaimlerChrysler, said vehicles powered by diesel
engines get 20 percent to 30 percent greater fuel economy over gas-powered
cars and cut emissions of the global warming gas carbon dioxide by 20
percent. In Europe, where diesels make up about half of the market in many
countries, the fuel economy average is 36 miles per gallon, compared with 24
in the United States.

 

''Why is there such a disparity? Aren't we the same companies in Europe that
we are in the U.S., with access to similar technologies?'' Zetsche said in
remarks at the show.

 

Zetsche said the difference was the European approach to energy policy,
which has involved some ''tough choices,'' including highly taxed gasoline
and incentives for diesel fuel.

 

Like a lot of other automakers, Zetsche stopped short of endorsing a
''European level of taxes'' or any huge government mandates in the area of
energy efficiency or global warming.

 

''We are a free market in the U.S.,'' he said. ''The consumer should rule.''

 

Karsner said major automakers will have to push harder into new technology
to reduce dependence on foreign sources of fuel.

 

After acknowledging the vehicles parked around him, Karsner said, ''I also
want to point out that concepts, prototypes and limited production vehicles
are not enough to address the problems we have.''

 

He said advanced technology should be sold to mainstream consumers, rather
than to those who buy only luxury vehicles.

 

''We need millions of cars on the road,'' he said.

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