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Subject:

From NASSP: Report Calls for End to Extra Pay for Master's Degrees

From:

Dan Kern <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 28 Jul 2009 16:17:28 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (216 lines)

 <http://space.sparklist.com/t/3614333/6589586/25940/0/> Report Calls for
End to Extra Pay for Master's Degrees
A new report from the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) found
that while states spend billions annually in salary increases for teachers
who earn advanced degrees, more education doesn't necessarily correlate with
improved student achievement. At a time when schools are already strapped
for cash, the "master's bump" costs the typical district $174 per pupil. On
average, master's degrees in education-which 90% of teachers' advanced
degrees are in-bear no relation to student achievement, the report said.
However, the data also indicated that degrees in math and science have in
fact been linked to improved student achievement. CRPE, 7/20/09 

Link to report, red-inked linked title above, and blurbed below:  Separation
of Degrees: State-By-State Analysis of Teacher Compensation for Master's
Degrees:  <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/289>
http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/289

PRESS RELEASE: 

Pay bump for teachers with master's degrees could be put to better use

  _____  

07/20/2009

Seattle, WA -- In this recessionary climate of depressed revenues and budget
cuts for education, school districts across the U.S. "would be foolhardy"
not to rethink paying teachers for master's degrees, according to a new
report out today.

"On average, master's degrees in education bear no relation to student
achievement," say education researchers Marguerite Roza and Raegen Miller in
their short paper, Separation
<http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/289>  of Degrees: State-By-State
Analysis of Teacher Compensation for Master's Degrees.

The brief was produced jointly by the Center on Reinventing Public Education
and the Center for American Progress <http://www.americanprogress.org/> .

"During this time of fiscal stringency, it should raise eyebrows when a
state automatically allocates such large sums of the average per-pupil
expenditure in a manner that is not even suspected of promoting higher
levels of student achievement," say the authors.

In hard dollars, this means New York state spends an extra $416 per student
(for a total of $1.121 billion a year) just because 78 percent of its
teachers hold master's degrees. In Washington state, the analogous numbers
are $319 per pupil (or $330 million a year total) for the 56 percent of its
teachers with a master's. These expenditures, respectively, represent 2.78
percent and 3.30 percent of the total federal, state, and local money
devoted to education in each state.

Roza and Miller chart these numbers for each state and suggest that the
money now committed to the master's bump in pay could be better spent,
writing that: "Teaching candidates with salient and meaningful master's
degrees should be given preferential attention when competing for jobs, all
else being equal. A master's degree in engineering, for example, should be
construed as evidence that a candidate possesses a deep understanding of a
subject matter that is relevant to teaching mathematics or science."

The authors acknowledge that changing long-established pay practices and
contractual schedules will not be easy. But they argue that from a strategic
point of view, this master's bump in pay "makes little sense because these
monies could be channeled into teacher compensation in ways that lead to
improved student performance."

Seeing the issue in the context of how a financial crisis can inspire
education reform focused on benefiting students, Roza and Miller conclude:

"In the fiscal climate ahead, school systems serious about improving results
for students will have no choice but to reconsider their long-automated ways
of spending money, uncover how much money is at stake, and compare current
ways of spending to alternative ones with greater potential to benefit
students."

Separation of Degrees: <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/289>
State-By-State Analysis of Teacher Compensation for Master's Degrees is
available at www.crpe.org. This is the fourth "Rapid Response" brief in the
$CHOOLS IN CRISIS: MAKING ENDS MEET series, designed to bring relevant
fiscal analyses to policymakers amidst the current economic crisis.


Source:  http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/news/80


Separation of Degrees: State-By-State Analysis of Teacher Compensation for
Master's Degrees

  _____  

July 2009
Marguerite Roza <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/authors/14> , Raegen
Miller <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/authors/150>  

Download
<http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/download/csr_files/rr_crpe_masters_jul09.pdf>
Full Report (PDF: 2009 K) 

School district finances are organized around the assumption that revenues
will increase more or less steadily, and at a rate higher than inflation.
Recent shifts in the underlying economic conditions of the country, however,
suggest that it would be foolhardy to continue operating under this
assumption. Many school districts will face stagnant or declining revenues
for some time to come, even with large infusions of federal money from the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Looking forward, many school systems will need both to reign in automatic
cost escalators, and to finance reform by repurposing current expenditures.
Under these criteria, compensation schemes are ripe for redesign: Teacher
salaries increase each year with longevity and graduate credits, making them
destined to escalate, and yet they have little link to student achievement.

Decoupling salary from experience is a tall order, but forward progress on
school reform requires school districts to revamp their spending habits
somehow. One habit related to experienced-based salary is the practice of
paying a teacher with a master's degree more than an otherwise identical
teacher with only a bachelor's degree. The long-cherished "master's bump"
makes little sense from a strategic point of view.

On average, master's degrees in education bear no relation to student
achievement...

Related Publications

Ranking the States: <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/286>  Federal
Education Stimulus Money and the Prospects for Reform

Projections of State <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/266>  Budget
Shortfalls on K-12 Public Education Spending and Job Loss

Seniority-Based Layoffs <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/csr_pubs/265>
Will Exacerbate Job Loss in Public Education

Related News

07/2009 
Pay bump for teachers with <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/news/80>
master's degrees could be put to better use

Context

Related Topics: Finance  <http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/topics/2> &
Productivity

Related Projects: Finance, Spending, and
<http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/projects/5>  Productivity Project

Related Initiatives: Schools
<http://www.crpe.org/cs/crpe/view/projects/5?page=initiatives&initiative=28>
in Crisis: Making Ends Meet 


Rootage:  www.nassp.org


www.principals.org   



 

 

 

Dan Kern

AD21, Reading

East Central College

1964 Prairie Dell Road

Union, MO  63084-4344

Phone:  (636) 583-5195

Extension:  2426

Fax:  (636) 584-0513

Email:  [log in to unmask]

 

http://www.studentveterans.org/

 

Cowardice asks the question, 'Is it safe?' Expediency asks the question, 'Is
it politic?' Vanity asks the question, 'Is it popular?' But, conscience asks
the question, 'Is it right?' And there comes a time when one must take a
position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but one must take it
because one's conscience tells one that it is right. (Martin Luther King,
Jr.) 

Instruction begins when you, the teacher, learn from the learner. Put

yourself in his place so that you may understand what he learns and

the way he understands it. (Kierkegaard)

 

To freely bloom - that is my definition of success. -Gerry Spence, lawyer
(b. 1929)    [Benjamin would be proud, I think.]

 


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