LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for SOCNET Archives


SOCNET Archives

SOCNET Archives


SOCNET@LISTS.UFL.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SOCNET Home

SOCNET Home

SOCNET  November 2009

SOCNET November 2009

Subject:

complextiy digest-- from last Friday

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 8 Nov 2009 14:58:18 -0500

Content-Type:

TEXT/PLAIN

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (126 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

 Barry Wellman
 _______________________________________________________________________

  S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, FRSC               NetLab Director
  Department of Sociology                  725 Spadina Avenue, Room 388
  University of Toronto   Toronto Canada M5S 2J4   twitter:barrywellman
  http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman             fax:+1-416-978-3963
  Updating history:      http://chass.utoronto.ca/oldnew/cybertimes.php
 _______________________________________________________________________



11. Cooperation between non-kin in animal societies , Nature

Abstract: Explanations of cooperation between non-kin in animal societies
often suggest that individuals exchange resources or services and that
cooperation is maintained by reciprocity. But do cooperative interactions
between unrelated individuals in non-human animals really resemble
exchanges or are they a consequence of simpler mechanisms? Firm evidence
of reciprocity in animal societies is rare and many examples of
cooperation between non-kin probably represent cases of intra-specific
mutualism or manipulation.

* [20] Cooperation between non-kin in animal societies, Tim Clutton-
Brock, 2009/11/5, DOI: 10.1038/nature08366, Nature 462, 51-57

[20] http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature08366

-------------------------

Cooperation, Norms, and Conflict: A Unified Approach , SFI Working Papers

Abstract: Cooperation is of utmost importance to society, but is often
challenged by individual self-interests. While game theory has studied
this problem extensively, there is little work on interactions within and
across groups with heterogeneous preferences. Yet, interactions between
people with incompatible interests often yield conflict, since behavior
that is considered cooperative by one population might be perceived as
non-cooperative by another. To understand the outcome of such competitive
interactions, we study game-dynamical replicator equations for multiple
populations with incompatible preferences and different power to reveal,
for example, what mechanisms can foster the evolution of behavioral norms?
When does cooperation fail, leading to conflict or even to revolutions?
What incentives are needed to reach peaceful agreements? Our quantitative
analysis reveals some striking results, significant for society, law, and
economics.

* [21] Cooperation, Norms, and Conflict: A Unified Approach, Dirk Helbing
and Anders Johansson, DOI: SFI-WP 09-09-040, SFI Working Papers

[21] http://www.santafe.edu/research/publications/wpabstract/200909040

_________________________________________________________________


 Evolutionary Dynamics of Populations with Conflicting Interactions:
Classification and Analytical Treatment Considering Asymmetry and Power ,
arXiv

Excerpts: Evolutionary game theory has been successfully used to
investigate the dynamics of systems, in which many entities have
competitive interactions.  From a physics point of view, it is interesting
to study conditions under which a coordination or cooperation of
interacting entities will occur, be it spins, particles, bacteria,
animals, or humans. (...) While these results are interesting from a
physics point of view, they are also relevant for social, economic, and
biological systems, as they allow one to understand conditions for (1) the
breakdown of cooperation, (2) the coexistence of different behaviors
("subcultures"), (2) the evolution of commonly shared behaviors ("norms"),
and (4) the occurence of polarization or conflict. We point out that norms
have a similar function in social systems that forces have in physics.

[22] Evolutionary Dynamics of Populations with Conflicting Interactions:
Classification and Analytical Treatment Considering Asymmetry and Power,
Dirk Helbing and Anders Johansson, 2009/11/2, arXiv:0911.0359

[22] http://arXiv.org/abs/0911.0359

--------------------------

Influence of the variance of degree distributions on the
evolution of
cooperation in complex networks , Physica A

Excerpt: We study how initial network structure affects the evolution of
cooperation in a spatial prisoner^s dilemma game. The network structure
is characterized by various statistical properties. Among those
properties, we focus on the variance of the degree distribution, and
inquire how it affects the evolution of cooperation by three methods of
imitation. For every method, it was found that a scale-free network does
not always promote the evolution of cooperation, and that there exists an
appropriate value of the variance, at which cooperation is optimal.

* [25] Influence of the variance of degree distributions on the evolution
of cooperation in complex networks, Tsukamoto E , Shirayama S, October 13,
2009, DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2009.10.002, Physica A: Statistical Mechanics
and its Applications 389 (3) 577-586

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physa.2009.10.002
----------------------------------

The Development of Social Simulation as Reflected in the First Ten Years
of JASSS: a Citation and Co-Citation Analysis , JASSS

Excerpt: [...] First, we use citation analysis to identify the most
influential publications and to verify characteristics of social
simulation such as its multidisciplinary nature. Then, we perform a
co-citation analysis to visualize the intellectual structure of social
simulation and its development.  Overall, the analysis shows social
simulation both in its early stage and during its first steps towards
becoming a more differentiated discipline.

* [33] The Development of Social Simulation as Reflected in the First Ten
Years of JASSS: a Citation and Co-Citation Analysis, Meyer M , Lorscheid I
, Troitzsch KG, October 31, 2009, Journal of Artificial Societies and
Social Simulation 12 (4) 2

[33] http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/12/4/2.html

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008, Week 62
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.UFL.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager