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SOCNET  March 2011

SOCNET March 2011

Subject:

Complexity Digest -- catching up

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:32:27 -0400

Content-Type:

MULTIPART/MIXED

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (67 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

  Barry Wellman
  _______________________________________________________________________

   S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, FRSC               NetLab Director
   Department of Sociology                  725 Spadina Avenue, Room 388
   University of Toronto   Toronto Canada M5S 2J4   twitter:barrywellman
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman             fax:+1-416-978-3963
   Updating history:      http://chass.utoronto.ca/oldnew/cybertimes.php
  _______________________________________________________________________

  Co-Residence Patterns in Hunter-Gatherer Societies Show Unique Human 
Social Structure , Science

Abstract: Contemporary humans exhibit spectacular biological success 
derived from cumulative culture and cooperation. The origins of these 
traits may be related to our ancestral group structure. Because humans 
lived as foragers for 95% of our species history, we analyzed co-residence 
patterns among 32 present-day foraging societies (total n = 5067 
individuals, mean experienced band size = 28.2 adults). We found that 
hunter-gatherers display a unique social structure where (i) either sex 
may disperse or remain in their natal group, (ii) adult brothers and 
sisters often co-reside, and (iii) most individuals in residential groups 
are genetically unrelated. These patterns produce large interaction 
networks of unrelated adults and suggest that inclusive fitness cannot 
explain extensive cooperation in hunter-gatherer bands. However, large 
social networks may help to explain why humans evolved capacities for 
social learning that resulted in cumulative culture.

* [6] Co-Residence Patterns in Hunter-Gatherer Societies Show Unique Human 
Social Structure, Kim R. Hill, Robert S. Walker, Miran Boievi, James Eder, 
Thomas Headland, Barry Hewlett, A. Magdalena Hurtado, Frank Marlowe, Polly 
Wiessner, and Brian Wood, 2011/03/11, DOI: 10.1126/science.1199071, 
Science Vol. 331 no. 6022 pp. 1286-1289 [6] 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1199071

----------------------------

Motifs in co-authorship networks and their relation to the impact of
scientific publications , Eur. Phys. J. B

Excerpts: Co-authorship networks, where the nodes are authors and a link 
indicates joint publications, are very helpful representations for 
studying the processes that shape the scientific community. At the same 
time, they are social networks with a large amount of data available and 
can thus serve as vehicles for analyzing social phenomena in general. 
(...) Here we show that the success of individual authors or publications 
depends unexpectedly strongly on an intermediate scale in co-authorship 
networks. (...) We find that the average citation frequency of a group of 
authors depends on the motifs these authors form. In particular, a box 
motif (four authors forming a closed chain) has the highest average 
citation frequency per link. (...) We argue that the box motif may be an 
interesting category in a broad range of social and technical networks. * 
[15] Motifs in co-authorship networks and their relation to the impact of 
scientific publications, L. Krumov, C. Fretter, M. Müller-Hannemann, K. 
Weihe and M.-T. Hütt, 2011/03/01, DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2011-10746-5, Eur. 
Phys. J. B [15] http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2011-10746-5


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