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SOCNET  October 2013

SOCNET October 2013

Subject:

Re: Fear in Networks

From:

Moses Boudourides <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Moses Boudourides <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 3 Oct 2013 21:22:15 +0300

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (274 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Harrison C. White argues in Network Switchings and Bayesian Forks:
Reconstructing the Social and Behavioral Sciences:

"Ties of a type are both network and domain, both relation and talk.
It is talk that switches, not tie—and certainly not persons, they
being deposits and byproducts of the process. The substance of a type
of tie lies in what reflexive accountings are accepted in that
network-domain as warranties, and in what are the presuppositions and
entailments. These can all together be approximated as a particular
set of accepted stories.
Thus, within a particular micro-historical setting, the tie is also a
boundary, which comes as the envelope of a joint selection process
across story set."

If this is the case and furthermore there is access to the textual (or
audio-visual, video etc.) content of ties-stories in a social network,
then one could use various machine-learning techniques to do something
like sentiment (or opinion) analysis, in which sentiments like fear
(for example) might arise among the harvested parameters under
consideration.

However, in a literal sense, what Harrison White insinuates is the
importance of edge(tie)-based attributes over actor-based ones. This
could mean that one might need to elaborate a sort of assortativity
analysis for edge attributes, instead of vertex attributes (already
studied extensively). In particular, this would necessitate a
comprehensive analysis of multiplexity in social networks, not so much
from the point of view of aggregating all the existing multirelational
(sub)patterns but mainly from the angle of their (inter)correlations
and adjacencies. Note that, if ties are directed, then there are
multiple ways to define line correlations and adjacencies, which
result to different ways of obtaining useful network aggregations
(such as community partitions etc.).

--Moses

On Thu, Oct 3, 2013 at 8:57 PM, Stephen D. Bird - sbird
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Fowler and Christakis’ work on happiness, and others, seems to imply that
> emotion is socially mediated…
>
>
>
> Fowler, James H., and Nicholas A. Christakis. "Dynamic spread of happiness
> in a large social network: longitudinal analysis over 20 years in the
> Framingham Heart Study." BMJ: British medical journal 337 (2008).
>
>
>
> Cacioppo, John T., James H. Fowler, and Nicholas A. Christakis. "Alone in
> the crowd: the structure and spread of loneliness in a large social
> network." Journal of personality and social psychology 97.6 (2009): 977.
>
>
>
> Hill, Alison L., et al. "Emotions as infectious diseases in a large social
> network: the SISa model." Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological
> Sciences277.1701 (2010): 3827-3835.
>
>
>
> Stephen Bird     -     Assistant Professor, Political Science; Clarkson
> University
>
> 315-268-3990; (c) 857-753-5507; http://people.clarkson.edu/~sbird/
>
>
>
> For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and
> wrong     ~H. L. Mencken
>
>
>
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of John T. Maloney
> Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2013 1:21 PM
>
>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [SOCNET] Fear in Networks
>
>
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Fear is an emotion. It’s an affected state of consciousness. Are emotions
> socially mediated? Contagious? Networks? Are emotions homophilous?  Not
> sure. Maybe anxious people like other anxious people. Who knows? Lots of
> people like scary movies. Do joyful people hangout with other joyful people?
> If any are true then study of any emotion, joy, sorrow, love, etc., would
> probably indicate some network propagation. Interesting question.
>
>
>
> Meanwhile, where do emotions, opinions and actions begin and start?
> ‘Diffusion of Innovation’ is well studied. Does ‘Diffusion of Emotion’ make
> sense? We all know ‘Diffusion of Opinion’ matters. It’s a huge global media
> business. Can emotions exhibit herd behaviors? Etc.
>
>
>
> IMO, emotions are innate properties that are relatively sticky and
> individual, e.g., people don’t get fearful/scared because someone next to
> them is scared. Someone gets scared when there is a perceived threat. If the
> threat comes from an edge, that’s different.
>
>
>
> For example, would you be sorrowful at a wake for an unknown person? Me? No.
>
>
>
> -j
>
>
>
> Possible paradox: Would you be joyful at an Irish wake for a known person?
> Yes, definitely.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
> Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2013 9:01 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [SOCNET] Fear in Networks
>
>
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
>
>
> Robert, we are talking about both: emergence of opinion/stand in a network
> and emergence/distribution of fear in a network.  I am running across more
> and more client situations where it is important to understand fear in human
> networks, and how it spreads.
>
>
>
> Mark, thanks for the "Experiments in Social Computation" link... looks very
> interesting!
>
>
>
> Valdis
>
>
>
> On Oct 3, 2013, at 9:56 AM, nativebuddha wrote:
>
>
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> I think it's important to emphasize that we are talking about the broader
> idea of "changing opinion" in a network, rather than the more specific
> concept of "fear". You might find more supporting literature if you re-frame
> it this way.
>
>
>
> -Robert
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Oct 3, 2013 at 5:11 AM, Mark Kibanov <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>
> Michael Kearns in "Experiments in Social Computation"
> (Doi:10.1145/2347736.2347753,
> http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~mkearns/papers/CACM.pdf) showed interesting series
> of experiments. One of them showed how a well-connected minority changes the
> opinion of majority (see Figure 7). The minority may even not know they are
> minority. He personally called it a "republican phenomena" during his
> keynote.
>
>
>
> Hope, it brings you further.
>
>
>
> Best regards,
>
> Mark
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Mark Kibanov         Tel.: +49-(0)561-804-6253
>
> [log in to unmask]   www.kde.cs.uni-kassel.de/kibanov/
>
>
>
> Am 03.10.2013 um 04:57 schrieb Valdis Krebs <[log in to unmask]>:
>
>
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Looking at the current US government shutdown... it "appears" that a small
> group of far-right politicians (a minority in their own Republican Party)
> have sway over the rest of the party (many of whom do not want the
> shutdown), but out of fear(apparently) all Republicans are supporting/voting
> the minority view.
>
> Can a smart sociologist explain what is going on?  Have any SNA studies been
> done on how a small minority(~10%) controls a majority in a bounded network?
> Any good papers on fear in networks?
>
> Valdis Krebs
> http://orgnet.com
> http://thenetworkthinkers.com
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
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>
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET
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>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET
> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network
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>
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET
> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network
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>
> _____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET
> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network
> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to
> [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of
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>
> _____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET
> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network
> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to
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_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
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