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Subject:

Re: Phys.Org

From:

Kath Ruggeri <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 9 Apr 2014 16:13:38 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (404 lines)

I administer our Academic Success Program, which has the following
components:

-Completion of an academic recovery plan
-Initial one-hour consultation with me
-Mandatory attendance of 4-6 success seminars, also taught by me, covering
the usual topics (time management, note-taking, career development, etc.),
but also training in how to recognize and make changes in self-defeating
behavior (positive goal setting, avoiding victim language, self-management,
self-assessment).
-I have guest speakers come and present on health and wellness issues (a
key component to success, I've found, is adequate rest, nutrition, and
exercise).
-Require interdependence: I schedule students with appropriate, often
hand-picked tutors or other campus professionals
-Email professors and coaches regarding a student's progress--ask for
insight
-Monitor my college's Early Alert submissions (a form filled out by
professors regarding student performance in all areas of endeavor, not just
graded papers, tests, and quizzes, but whether the student arrives on time,
with paper, pencil, and the textbook ready to work, or is the student
sleeping is class, or leaving early, etc....). Email professors for
specific information so that I may offer tailored solutions to problems.
-Become a member of the college committees that deal with student concerns
and issues; I often learn much in these meetings that allows me to devise
appropriate interventions for struggling students.
-Schedule follow-up meetings with students failing to meet their academic
success requirements, and be willing to work with them one-on-one if
necessary.
-Talk with students outside my office, in the cafeteria, the quad, the
library.
-Email short, interesting articles about success topics and solicit
feedback from the students on how the principles might apply to their lives.
-Invite students to campus events, such as guest lectures, etiquette
dinners, and the majors fair.
-Get on a first name basis with as many departments at your college as
possible--make allies and build relationships with those who interact with
students.
-Get a stack of business cards from your campus psychiatric counseling
staff and don't be afraid to urge students to get help. Don't be afraid to
give them the card multiple times.
-Listen, listen, listen to what the student has to say...and listen for
what they are not saying
-Model good behavior: Switch roles with the student and teach them how to
approach professors with questions and concerns.
-Be willing to teach students how to use their planning tools, such as
phone scheduling apps or their paper datebooks.
-Genuinely praise even modest gains; a student who goes from studying four
hours a week to ten hours a week is arguably under-studying, but has
nevertheless made a tremendous improvement worth commending.
-I'm giving students a ton of information during our interactions: I them
back to their rooms with a next-actions list of where to go now that the
meeting is over.

I'm willing to bet our list brothers and sisters could add many more items
to the list above. I'd appreciate hearing some of your success strategies.

Kath






On Wed, Apr 9, 2014 at 11:50 AM, Aldrich,Charlene <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Will you describe your proactive academic advising?  We struggle with any
> of our students taking advantage of their advisors' willingness to help.
>  Charlene
>
> ________________________________________
> From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [
> [log in to unmask]] on behalf of Kath Ruggeri [
> [log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Wednesday, April 09, 2014 11:47 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Phys.Org
>
> I work with students on academic probation and those identified by test
> scores as under-prepared and needing academic support. I use the proactive
> (formerly intrusive) academic advising model and I see real academic
> recovery, as demonstrated by significantly higher average GPAs, the number
> of units/credits attempted, and the number of units/credits actually
> completed. Proactive advising has great outcomes, but is incredibly
> time-consuming. Whenever I find my energy flagging, or I'm feeling
> overwhelmed by the needs of the many, I'm reminded of the many
> inspirational true-life stories of educationally marginalized students in
> Mike Rose's *Lives on the Boundary. *I tell myself that my intervention--my
> investment in the student, if you will--may be the one act of encouragement
> that keeps him or her engaged and coming back to class.
>
> A college education does not always guarantee a better job, but it grants
> greater access to work with a sustainable wage. The number of Bill Gates'
>  who can drop out of college and form a successful company are the
> exception, not the rule; I want to see an expansion of effective academic
> support systems in colleges, not a lessening of such programs. Investing in
> our students, especially those who are under-prepared because they come to
> us from school systems that failed to ready them for the challenges of
> college, is noble work that I am honored to shoulder. The real challenge is
> determining what are the best interventions.
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 9, 2014 at 11:04 AM, Aldrich,Charlene <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Why not place them into actual course rather than the prereq?
> >
> > I'm all for either if the student could take the final exam of any prereq
> > and pass it.
> >
> > And I do want each and every person who steps foot on my campus to become
> > everything that he/she was created to be.  I do and will continue to do
> > everything it takes to support that student's work to that end.
> >
> > C
> >
> > Let your life speak.
> >
> >
> > Charlene Aldrich, Instructor
> > Academic Coordinator
> > Palmer Campus
> > Trident Technical College
> > Charleston, SC  29412
> > 843.722.5516
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> > [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Donna Kim Ballard
> > Sent: Wednesday, April 09, 2014 10:30 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: Phys.Org
> >
> > Well, because strategies exist that can help some students learn what
> they
> > need to learn during the prereq course they may have seemed not qualified
> > to take, and it's hard to really know if students aren't under-prepared
> for
> > a course, despite the convenience of COMPASS and other simple but fairly
> > ineffective placement tests. I guess the choice of allowing a student
> into
> > a prereq depends on each individual student and what the definition of
> > "underprepared" is and how that label/reality is determined.
> >
> > As long as college education = better job and being uplifted out of
> > poverty or being able to continue to live at the level (or above) of
> one's
> > parents or being able to reach a goal one has or being able to feel one
> is
> > following a desired path, then many people will be willing to try to
> teach
> > students. It's the time of the year for frustration, of course, but I
> think
> > I'd let student's lives speak in complex enough ways to allow them to be
> > given a good chance at success if they want to try, and my job may be
> > helping them see what's involved in course/goal/college success. The rub
> is
> > the "good chance" I'd hope students can hae often translates to
> > under-budgeted and overworked instruction. So if we had world enough and
> > time (and money) may be the real rub here, not the students necessarily.
> > And then we're looking at economics, class, ability definitions and
> access,
> > and other social issues . . . .
> >
> > Kim
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Charlene Aldrich" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Sent: Wednesday, April 9, 2014 10:14:45 AM
> > Subject: Re: Phys.Org
> >
> > But why would you want to place a student in to the prereq course if they
> > are underprepared for it?
> >
> > Let your life speak.
> >
> >
> > Charlene Aldrich, Instructor
> > Academic Coordinator
> > Palmer Campus
> > Trident Technical College
> > Charleston, SC  29412
> > 843.722.5516
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> > [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Larina Warnock
> > Sent: Tuesday, April 08, 2014 12:55 PM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: Phys.Org
> >
> > This is very interesting. I wonder what systemic forces might be at work
> > at the four-year level and if there is any variation between departments.
> > It seems that developmental coursework might keep someone out of a prereq
> > during the term they need it, for example.
> >
> > Larina Warnock
> > Developmental Studies Instructor
> > WH214
> > 541-917-2311
> >
> > We read to know we are not alone. -C.S. Lewis
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Apr 8, 2014 at 9:28 AM, Nic Voge <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > > Intriguing. This makes sense to me: "We need further investigation of
> > > the ingredients for success at those colleges where taking
> > > developmental coursework..."
> > >
> > > I think these courses should be conceptualized as preparatory
> > > (prospective) more than remedial (retrospective) in focus. What do
> > > receiving institutions expect of students seems to me to be a crucial
> > > question with lots of different answers.
> > > Nic
> > > __________________________________
> > > Dominic (Nic) J. Voge
> > > [log in to unmask]
> > > (609)258-6921
> > > http://www.princeton.edu/mcgraw/us/
> > >
> > > Associate Director
> > > McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning 328C Frist Campus Center
> > > Princeton University Princeton, NJ 08544
> > >
> > > Individual Appointment Times:
> > > By request
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > On Apr 8, 2014, at 11:06 AM, Norman Stahl wrote:
> > >
> > >  Remedial courses fail bachelor's degree seekers, but boost those in
> > >> associate's programs
> > >> April 7th, 2014 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Taking remedial courses at the four-year college level may hold
> > >> students back from earning their bachelor's degrees, but at the
> > >> community college level remedial education can help earn an
> > >> associate's degree, according to researchers from Boston College's
> > Lynch School of Education.
> > >> The role of remedial education has been under scrutiny for years,
> > >> viewed as an essential tool in efforts to raise rates of degree
> > >> completion. At the same time, critics question whether the courses
> > >> are appropriate for institutions of higher education.
> > >> The answer may not be so simple, according to Lynch School researcher
> > >> Katherine A. Shields and Associate Professor of Education Laura M.
> > >> O'Dwyer, who reviewed a federal database of interviews and academic
> > >> transcript data from more than 10,000 students at 670 two- and
> > four-year institutions.
> > >> At four-year colleges, students who took three or more remedial
> > >> courses struggled to attain a bachelor's degree when compared to
> > >> similar peers who took no remedial courses, according to the
> > >> researchers, who presented their findings today at the American
> > >> Educational Research Association (AERA) annual meeting in
> Philadelphia.
> > >> Among students at two-year colleges, taking developmental education
> > >> courses was associated with better odds of earning an associate's
> > >> degree but no higher within six years of enrollment, Shields and
> > >> O'Dwyer discovered, drawing on data collected from college students
> > >> between 2004 and 2009.
> > >> When the researchers looked at the relationship of taking remedial
> > >> courses to the chances of two-year college students ultimately
> > >> earning a bachelor's degree, the potential benefits of the courses
> > disappeared.
> > >> Taking three or more remedial courses at the two-year college level
> > >> was negatively associated with attaining a bachelor's degree, they
> > found.
> > >> Developmental education may divert them from transferring to complete
> > >> a higher degree.
> > >> In addition, the results of remedial courses varied from one two-year
> > >> institution to another, which may reflect the diversity of new
> > >> developmental course models arising during the period of the study,
> > >> according to O'Dwyer, a specialist in educational research,
> > >> measurement, and evaluation.
> > >> Shields said the results show that remedial education at the two-year
> > >> level is not a hindrance in the same way as it seems to be at the
> > >> four-year level, but researchers need to delve into which types of
> > >> programs are the most effective and why.
> > >> "We need further investigation of the ingredients for success at
> > >> those colleges where taking developmental coursework doesn't hold
> > >> students back from finishing an associate's degree," Shields said.
> > >> "Are there institutional policies that do a better job of matching
> > >> students to courses? Are innovations in developmental curriculum
> > >> paying off? The picture looks a lot more complex than in the four-year
> > setting."
> > >> More information: O'Dwyer and Shields will present their paper
> > >> "College Completion and Remedial Education: Do Institutional
> > >> Characteristics Make a Difference?" at 8:15 a.m. on Monday, April 7.
> > >> For more information about the session, please see this link.
> > >>
> > >> Provided by Boston College
> > >>
> > >> "Remedial courses fail bachelor's degree seekers, but boost those in
> > >> associate's programs." April 7th, 2014. http://phys.org/news/2014-04-
> > >> remedial-courses-bachelor-degree-seekers.html
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Norman Stahl
> > >> [log in to unmask]
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > >> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
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> > >>
> > >> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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> > >
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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>
>
> --
> Christine Kath Ruggeri
> Writing Center Director,
> Assistant Director, Center for Academic and Career Engagement
> 718-420-4080
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
> subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web
> browser to
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>
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> browser to
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> To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]
>



-- 
Christine Kath Ruggeri
Writing Center Director,
Assistant Director, Center for Academic and Career Engagement
718-420-4080

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
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