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SOCNET  April 2014

SOCNET April 2014

Subject:

Selected Latest Complexity Digest Posts (fwd)

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:10:29 -0400

Content-Type:

MULTIPART/MIXED

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TEXT/PLAIN (72 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****


   Barry Wellman
  _______________________________________________________________________

   NetLab                        FRSC                      INSNA Founder
   Faculty of Information (iSchool)                 611 Bissell Building
   140 St. George St.    University of Toronto    Toronto Canada M5S 3G6
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman          twitter: @barrywellman
                  NSA/CSEC: Canadian and American citizen
   NETWORKED:The New Social Operating System. Lee Rainie & Barry Wellman
   MIT Press            http://amzn.to/zXZg39      Print $14  Kindle $16
                  Old/NewCyberTimes http://bit.ly/c8N9V8
   ________________________________________________________________________


The infection tree of global epidemics

    The spreading of transmissible infectious diseases is inevitably entangled with the dynamics of human population. Humans are the carrier of the pathogen, and the large-scale travel and commuting patterns that govern the mobility of modern societies are defining how epidemics and pandemics travel across the world. For a long time, the development of quantitative spatially explicit models able to shed light on the global dynamics of pandemic has been limited by the lack of detailed data on human mobility. In the last 10 years, however, these limits have been lifted by the increasing availability of data generated by new information technologies, thus triggering the development of computational (microsimulation) models working at a level of single individuals in spatially extended regions of the world. Microsimulations can provide information at very detailed spatial resolutions and down to the level of single individuals. In addition, computational implementations explicitly
account for stochasticity, allowing the study of multiple realizations of epidemics with the same parameters' distribution. While on the one hand these capabilities represent the richness of microsimulation methods, on the other hand they face us with a huge amount of information that requires the use of specific data reduction methods and visual analytics.

The infection tree of global epidemics
ANA PASTORE Y PIONTTI, MARCELO FERREIRA DA COSTA GOMES, NICOLE SAMAY, NICOLA PERRA and ALESSANDRO VESPIGNANI

Network Science
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/nws.2014.5

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4019681526/2014/04/19/the-infection-tree-of-global-epidemics) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)



Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks

    Our empirical analysis demonstrates that in the chosen network data sets, nodes which had a high Closeness Centrality also had a high Eccentricity Centrality. Likewise high Degree Centrality also correlated closely with a high Eigenvector Centrality. Whereas Betweenness Centrality varied according to network topology and did not demonstrate any noticeable pattern. In terms of identification of key nodes, we discovered that as compared with other centrality measures, Eigenvector and Eccentricity Centralities were better able to identify important nodes.

Batool K, Niazi MA (2014) Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks. PLoS ONE 9(4): e90283. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090283

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4019671305/2014/04/15/towards-a-methodology-for-validation-of-centrality-measures-in-complex-networks) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)



The Social Face of Complexity Science: A Festschrift for Professor Peter M. Allen (by Mark Strathern & James McGlade)

    This work is to honour Professor Peter M. Allen, a seminal figure in the foundation and development of Complexity Science in human systems. From before the time of his joining Nobel Prize winner Ilya Progogine's pioneering group at the Université libre de Bruxelles in 1967 Peter had started publishing on what was then known as Prigogine theory in physics. But it was only after this that his own pioneering work in Complexity Science showed the importance of its applications in evolutionary and human sciences. Since then he has been an influential and guiding figure in this field. The works collected are by admiring colleagues, friends and collaborators, all leaders in their fields, influenced by his seminal ides, and gathered from across a gamut of fields in human systems. This makes this a valuable and unique work, a veritable reader in the influence Complex Systems theory on a wide and diverse range of fields; from archaeology, city design, international banking, economics,
policy studies and more.

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks/p/4019443447/2014/04/14/the-social-face-of-complexity-science-a-festschrift-for-professor-peter-m-allen-by-mark-strathern-james-mcglade) , via CxBooks (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks)



Why marathons have runner 'traffic jams'

    How do such crowding problems arise, and could they be reduced? Some researchers believe that we can find the answers through a more familiar system in which jams appear ? road traffic flow. Martin Treiber, of the Technical University of Dresden in Germany, has previously developed models for traffic flow, and now he has reported modifications that capture the essential details of sporting events such as marathons.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140409-why-marathons-are-like-road-jams

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4019460547/2014/04/14/why-marathons-have-runner-traffic-jams) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)


You can contribute to Complexity Digest selecting one of our topics (http://www.scoop.it/u/complexity-digest ) and using the "Suggest" button.
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