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SOCNET  August 2014

SOCNET August 2014

Subject:

selected [comdig] Latest Complexity Digest Posts (fwd)

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:58:11 -0400

Content-Type:

MULTIPART/MIXED

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TEXT/PLAIN (161 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****




   Barry Wellman
  _______________________________________________________________________
   FRSC		              NetLab Network              INSNA Founder
                      Faculty of Information (iSchool)
   University of Toronto                          Toronto Canada M5S 3G6
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman          twitter: @barrywellman
   NETWORKED:The New Social Operating System. Lee Rainie & Barry Wellman
   MIT Press            http://amzn.to/zXZg39      Print $15  Kindle $9
                  Old/NewCyberTimes http://bit.ly/c8N9V8
   ________________________________________________________________________


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 09:20:36 -0500
From: Complexity Digest Administration <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [comdig] Latest Complexity Digest Posts

Learn about the latest and greatest related to complex systems research. More at http://comdig.unam.mx



Epidemic processes in complex networks

    In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and socio-technical systems. The complex properties of real world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. Here we present a coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, epidemiologists, computer and social scientists share a common interest
in studying epidemic spreading and rely on very similar models for the description of the diffusion of pathogens, knowledge, and innovation. For this reason, while we focus on the main results and the paradigmatic models in infectious disease modeling, we also present the major results concerning generalized social contagion processes. Finally we outline the research activity at the forefront in the study of epidemic spreading in co-evolving and time-varying networks.

Epidemic processes in complex networks
Romualdo Pastor-Satorras, Claudio Castellano, Piet Van Mieghem, Alessandro Vespignani

http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2701

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4026504541/2014/08/23/epidemic-processes-in-complex-networks) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)



Revealing networks from dynamics: an introduction

    What can we learn from the collective dynamics of a complex network about its interaction topology? Taking the perspective from nonlinear dynamics, we briefly review recent progress on how to infer structural connectivity (direct interactions) from accessing the dynamics of the units. Potential applications range from interaction networks in physics, to chemical and metabolic reactions, protein and gene regulatory networks as well as neural circuits in biology and electric power grids or wireless sensor networks in engineering. Moreover, we briefly mention some standard ways of inferring effective or functional connectivity.

Revealing networks from dynamics: an introduction
Marc Timme, Jose Casadiego

http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2963

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4026689184/2014/08/23/revealing-networks-from-dynamics-an-introduction) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)


Evolution of regulatory networks towards adaptability and stability in a changing environment

    Diverse biological networks exhibit universal features distinguished from those of random networks, calling much attention to their origins and implications. Here we propose a minimal evolution model of Boolean regulatory networks, which evolve by selectively rewiring links towards enhancing adaptability to a changing environment and stability against dynamical perturbations. We find sparse and heterogeneous connectivity patterns to emerge, which show qualitative agreement with real transcriptional regulatory networks and metabolic networks. The characteristic scaling behavior of stability reflects the balance between robustness and flexibility. The scaling of fluctuation in the perturbation spread shows a dynamic crossover, which is analyzed by investigating separately the stochasticity of internal dynamics and the network structures different depending on the evolution pathways. Our study delineates how the ambivalent pressure of evolution shapes biological networks, which
can be helpful for studying general complex systems interacting with environments.


"Evolution of regulatory networks towards adaptability and stability in a changing environment"

Deok-Sun Lee, arXiv:1408.4221, 2014
http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.4221

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4026632186/2014/08/22/evolution-of-regulatory-networks-towards-adaptability-and-stability-in-a-changing-environment) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)


A Magna Carta for the web

    Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it˙˙s worth a listen when he warns us: There˙˙s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web˙˙s wide-open spaces. It˙˙s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want?

http://on.ted.com/h0Pgm

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/talks/p/4026690138/2014/08/21/a-magna-carta-for-the-web) , via Talks (http://www.scoop.it/t/talks)


Local rewiring rules for evolving complex networks

    The effects of link rewiring are considered for the class of directed networks where each node has the same fixed out-degree. We model a network generated by three mechanisms that are present in various networked systems; growth, global rewiring and local rewiring. During a rewiring phase a node is randomly selected, one of its out-going edges is detached from its destination then re-attached to the network in one of two possible ways; either globally to a randomly selected node, or locally to a descendant of a descendant of the originally selected node. Although the probability of attachment to a node increases with its connectivity, the probability of detachment also increases, the result is an exponential degree distribution with a small number of outlying nodes that have extremely large degree. We explain these outliers by identifying the circumstances for which a set of nodes can grow to very high degree.


"Local rewiring rules for evolving complex networks"
Ewan R. Colman, Geoff J. Rodgers, arXiv:1408.3570, 2014
http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3570

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers/p/4026508620/2014/08/19/local-rewiring-rules-for-evolving-complex-networks) , via Papers (http://www.scoop.it/t/papers)



The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society

    The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich.

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/talks/p/4026496881/2014/08/18/the-world-after-big-data-building-the-self-regulating-society) , via Talks (http://www.scoop.it/t/talks)



Beyond Bibliometrics: Harnessing Multidimensional Indicators of Scholarly Impact (edited by Blaise Cronin & Cassidy R. Sugimoto)

    Bibliometrics has moved well beyond the mere tracking of bibliographic citations. The web enables new ways to measure scholarly productivity and impact, making available tools and data that can reveal patterns of intellectual activity and impact that were previously invisible: mentions, acknowledgments, endorsements, downloads, recommendations, blog posts, tweets. This book describes recent theoretical and practical advances in metrics-based research, examining a variety of alternative metrics -- or "altmetrics" -- while also considering the ethical and cultural consequences of relying on metrics to assess the quality of scholarship. Once the domain of information scientists and mathematicians, bibliometrics is now a fast-growing, multidisciplinary field that ranges from webometrics to scientometrics to influmetrics. The contributors to Beyond Bibliometrics discuss the changing environment of scholarly publishing, the effects of open access and Web 2.0 on genres of discourse,
novel analytic methods, and the emergence of next-generation metrics in a performance-conscious age.



See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks/p/4025694740/2014/08/18/beyond-bibliometrics-harnessing-multidimensional-indicators-of-scholarly-impact-edited-by-blaise-cronin-cassidy-r-sugimoto) , via CxBooks (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks)


Great Minds: Reflections of 111 Top Scientists (by Balazs Hargittai et al.)

    Throughout the 1990s and the 2000s, Istvan, Balazs, and Magdolna Hargittai conducted hundreds of interviews with leading scientists in physics, chemistry, materials, and biomedical research. These interviews appeared in a variety of publications, including Chemical Intelligencer, Mathematical Intelligencer, and Chemical Heritage. In four-thousand pages of interviews, the Hargittais had conversations with over a hundred Nobel laureates, along with many other top minds and personalities in various scientific fields.
Now, in a single volume, the Hargittais have gathered the best and most notable moments of these interviews, creating a survey of the past, present, and future of science, as told by some of the most influential members of many scientific disciplines. Figures like James D. Watson, Francis Crick, and Glenn T. Seaborg share their thoughts in these pages, in a collection that includes 68 Nobel Laureates. Without exaggeration, their backgrounds come from all over the globe: scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, and Taiwan are featured. These interviews discuss many of the most prominent debates and issues in today's scientific climate. Great Minds is a synthesis of scientific thought, as told by some of the most notable scientists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.



See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks/p/4025625587/2014/08/18/great-minds-reflections-of-111-top-scientists-by-balazs-hargittai-et-al) , via CxBooks (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks)



Enigmas of Health and Disease: How Epidemiology Helps Unravel Scientific Mysteries (by Alfredo Morabia)

    This book is the principal account of epidemiology's role in the development of effective measures to identify, prevent, and treat diseases. Throughout history, epidemiologists have challenged conventional knowledge, elucidating mysteries of causality and paving the way for remedies. From the outbreak of the bubonic plague, cholera, and cancer to the search for an effective treatment of AIDS and the origins of Alzheimer's disease, epidemiological thought has been crucial in shaping our understanding of population health issues.

Alfredo Morabia's lucid retelling sheds new light on the historical triumphs of epidemiological research and allows for contemporary readers, patients, and nontechnical audiences to make sense of the immense amount of health information disseminated by the media. By drawing from both historical and contemporary sources, Morabia provides the reader with the tools to differentiate health beliefs from health knowledge. The book covers important topics, including the H1N1 swine flu epidemic, breast cancer, the effects of aspirin, and the link between cigarettes and lung cancer.



See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks/p/4025626359/2014/08/18/enigmas-of-health-and-disease-how-epidemiology-helps-unravel-scientific-mysteries-by-alfredo-morabia) , via CxBooks (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxbooks)



6th Annual Complexity in Business Conference

    Thursday and Friday, October 30 and 31, 2014˙˙Ronald Reagan Building, Washington, DC
The Annual Complexity in Business Conference endeavors to be the premier meeting for the intersection of Complex Systems and Business. The 6th annual conference will be a one and a half day event and will include talks by thought leaders and an audience blend of academics and industry practitioners. We are very excited to announce that this year we will be having a concurrent track during the conference and will be accepting abstract submissions from the public. We are looking forward to a lively set of interactions among a very distinguished group of researchers and business leaders. On Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 3 p.m. a series of talks at the Ronald Reagan Building will kick off the conference, followed by a cocktail reception and dinner at Oyamel Cocina Mexicana.
This event is sponsored by the Center for Complexity in Business at the Robert H. Smith School of Business and the University of Maryland.

http://ter.ps/ccbconf2014

See it on Scoop.it (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxconferences/p/4026478684/2014/08/18/6th-annual-complexity-in-business-conference) , via CxConferences (http://www.scoop.it/t/cxconferences)



==============================================
Sponsored by the Complex Systems Society.
Founding Editor: Gottfried Mayer.
Editor-in-Chief: Carlos Gershenson.

To manage subscriptions, please go to http://comdig.unam.mx/subscriptions.php

You can contribute to Complexity Digest selecting one of our topics (http://www.scoop.it/u/complexity-digest ) and using the "Suggest" button.
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