LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for SOCNET Archives


SOCNET Archives

SOCNET Archives


SOCNET@LISTS.UFL.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SOCNET Home

SOCNET Home

SOCNET  March 2016

SOCNET March 2016

Subject:

selected Latest Complexity Digest Posts (fwd)

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 7 Mar 2016 12:13:56 -0500

Content-Type:

MULTIPART/MIXED

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (162 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

go to their URL to read all of their items

   Barry Wellman
    A vision is just a vision if it's only in your head
    Step by step, link by link, putting it together
                  Streisand/Sondheim
  _______________________________________________________________________
   Visiting Prof         Schl of Information        University of Arizona
   NetLab Network                 FRSC                      INSNA Founder
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman           twitter: @barrywellman
   NETWORKED:The New Social Operating System   Lee Rainie & Barry Wellman
   MIT Press            http://amzn.to/zXZg39       Print $18  Kindle $11
   _______________________________________________________________________


Learn about the latest and greatest related to complex systems research. More at http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=57ee1da583&e=55e25a0e3e


Zika Virus: Endemic Versus Epidemic Dynamics and Implications for Disease Spread in the Americas

    Since being introduced into Brazil in 2014, Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread explosively across Central and South America. Although the symptoms of ZIKV are mild, recent evidence suggests a relationship between prenatal exposure to ZIKV and microcephaly. This has led to widespread panic, including travel alerts and warnings to avoid pregnancy. Because ZIKV is an emerging disease, response efforts are complicated by limited understanding of disease dynamics. To this end, we develop a novel state- and class-structured compartment model for ZIKV. Our model shows that the risk of prenatal ZIKV exposure should decrease dramatically following the initial wave of disease, reaching almost undetectable levels in endemic systems. Our model also suggests that efforts to reduce ZIKV prenatal exposures through mosquito management and avoidance may have minimal benefit, and may even result in increased risk of microcephaly in later years of an outbreak.


Zika Virus: Endemic Versus Epidemic Dynamics and Implications for Disease Spread in the Americas
Sharon Bewick, William F Fagan, Justin M Calabrese, Folashade Agusto
doi: http://unam.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=b2b6ac696d&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=247a58eb93&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=1a07b7cbd8&e=55e25a0e3e)

Exploring the Space of Viable Configurations in a Model of Metabolism˙˙Boundary Co-construction

    We introduce a spatial model of concentration dynamics that supports the emergence of spatiotemporal inhomogeneities that engage in metabolism˙˙boundary co-construction. These configurations exhibit disintegration following some perturbations, and self-repair in response to others. We define robustness as a viable configuration's tendency to return to its prior configuration in response to perturbations, and plasticity as a viable configuration's tendency to change to other viable configurations. These properties are demonstrated and quantified in the model, allowing us to map a space of viable configurations and their possible transitions. Combining robustness and plasticity provides a measure of viability as the average expected survival time under ongoing perturbation, and allows us to measure how viability is affected as the configuration undergoes transitions. The framework introduced here is independent of the specific model we used, and is applicable for quantifying
robustness, plasticity, and viability in any computational model of artificial life that demonstrates the conditions for viability that we promote.


Exploring the Space of Viable Configurations in a Model of Metabolism˙˙Boundary Co-construction
Eran Agmon, Alexander J. Gates, Valentin Churavy, Randall D. Beer

Artificial Life

http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=ec19998671&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=c14843c721&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=d260b4aecf&e=55e25a0e3e)



Estimation and monitoring of city-to-city travel times using call detail records

    Whenever someone makes or receives a call on a mobile telephone, a Call Detail Record (CDR) is automatically generated by the operator for billing purposes. CDRs have a wide range of applications beyond billing, from social science to data-driven development. Recently, CDRs have been increasingly used to study human mobility, whose understanding is crucial e.g. for planning efficient transportation infrastructure. A major difficulty in analyzing human mobility using CDR data is that the location of a cell phone user is not recorded continuously but typically only when a call is initiated or a text message is sent. In this paper we address this problem, and develop a method for estimating travel times between cities based on CDRs that relies not on individual trajectories of people, but their collective statistical properties. We apply our method to data from Senegal, released by Sonatel and Orange for the 2014 Data for Development Challenge. We turn CDR mobility traces to
estimates on travel times between Senegalese cities, filling an existing gap in knowledge. Moreover, the proposed method is shown to be highly valuable for monitoring travel conditions and their changes in near real-time, as demonstrated by measuring the decrease in travel times due to the opening of the Dakar-Diamniadio highway. Overall, our results indicate that it is possible to extract reliable de facto information on typical travel times that is useful for a variety of audiences ranging from casual travelers to transport infrastructure planners.


Estimation and monitoring of city-to-city travel times using call detail records
Rainer Kujala, Talayeh Aledavood and Jari Saramäki

EPJ Data Science 2016 5:6
http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=daac3a5da7&e=55e25a0e3e


See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=1c9b7dd17c&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=c5548e6ee3&e=55e25a0e3e)




Rate or Trade? Identifying Winning Ideas in Open Idea Sourcing

    Information technology (IT) has created new patterns of digitally-mediated collaboration that allow open sourcing of ideas for new products and services. These novel sociotechnical arrangements afford finely-grained manipulation of how tasks can be represented and have changed the way organizations ideate. In this paper, we investigate differences in behavioral decision-making resulting from IT-based support of open idea evaluation. We report results from a randomized experiment of 120 participants comparing IT-based decision-making support using a rating scale (representing a judgment task) and a preference market (representing a choice task). We find that the rating scale-based task invokes significantly higher perceived ease of use than the preference market-based task and that perceived ease of use mediates the effect of the task representation treatment on the users˙˙ decision quality. Furthermore, we find that the understandability of ideas being evaluated, which we
assess through the ideas˙˙ readability, and the perception of the task˙˙s variability moderate the strength of this mediation effect, which becomes stronger with increasing perceived task variability and decreasing understandability of the ideas. We contribute to the literature by explaining how perceptual differences of task representations for open idea evaluation affect the decision quality of users and translate into differences in mechanism accuracy. These results enhance our understanding of how crowdsourcing as a novel mode of value creation may effectively complement traditional work structures.


Rate or Trade? Identifying Winning Ideas in Open Idea Sourcing
Ivo Blohm, Christoph Riedl, Johann Füller, Jan Marco Leimeister

Information Systems Research

http://unam.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=f5a2f1b4d1&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=756dc3dcbd&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=e935df370c&e=55e25a0e3e)


The Research Space: using the career paths of scholars to predict the evolution of the research output of individuals, institutions, and nations

    In recent years scholars have built maps of science by connecting the academic fields that cite each other, are cited together, or that cite a similar literature. But since scholars cannot always publish in the fields they cite, or that cite them, these science maps are only rough proxies for the potential of a scholar, organization, or country, to enter a new academic field. Here we use a large dataset of scholarly publications disambiguated at the individual level to create a map of science-or research space-where links connect pairs of fields based on the probability that an individual has published in both of them. We find that the research space is a significantly more accurate predictor of the fields that individuals and organizations will enter in the future than citation based science maps. At the country level, however, the research space and citations based science maps are equally accurate. These findings show that data on career trajectories-the set of fields that
individuals have previously published in-provide more accurate predictors of future research output for more focalized units-such as individuals or organizations-than citation based science maps.

The Research Space: using the career paths of scholars to predict the evolution of the research output of individuals, institutions, and nations
Miguel R. Guevara, Dominik Hartmann, Manuel Aristarán, Marcelo Mendoza, César A. Hidalgo

http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=5b8acc920c&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=5bf68f1afa&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=73de05cc81&e=55e25a0e3e)



Temporal Network Analysis of Literary Texts

    We study temporal networks of characters in literature focusing on "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (1865) by Lewis Carroll and the anonymous "La Chanson de Roland" (around 1100). The former, one of the most influential pieces of nonsense literature ever written, describes the adventures of Alice in a fantasy world with logic plays interspersed along the narrative. The latter, a song of heroic deeds, depicts the Battle of Roncevaux in 778 A.D. during Charlemagne's campaign on the Iberian Peninsula. We apply methods recently developed by Taylor and coworkers \cite{Taylor+2015} to find time-averaged eigenvector centralities, Freeman indices and vitalities of characters. We show that temporal networks are more appropriate than static ones for studying stories, as they capture features that the time-independent approaches fail to yield.

Temporal Network Analysis of Literary Texts
Sandra D. Prado, Silvio R. Dahmen, Ana L.C. Bazzan, Padraig Mac Carron, Ralph Kenna

http://unam.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=d9e880e49d&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=81083acf90&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=e7ac9f6b45&e=55e25a0e3e)



Interconnected Networks (by Antonios Garas)

    This volume provides an introduction to and overview of the emerging 
field of interconnected networks which include multilayer or multiplex 
networks, as well as networks of networks. Such networks present 
structural and dynamical features quite different from those observed in 
isolated networks. The presence of links between different networks or 
layers of a network typically alters the way such interconnected networks 
behave ˙˙ understanding the role of interconnecting links is therefore a 
crucial step towards a more accurate description of real-world systems. 
While examples of such dissimilar properties are becoming more abundant ˙˙ 
for example regarding diffusion, robustness and competition ˙˙ the root of 
such differences remains to be elucidated.

Each chapter in this topical collection is self-contained and can be read on its own, thus making it also suitable as reference for experienced researchers wishing to focus on a particular topic.

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=18b30aef11&e=55e25a0e3e) , via CxBooks (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=d6b55b9347&e=55e25a0e3e)

[BW: Gotta put in 2 plugs. 1/ Paul Craven & I invented the "Network of 
Networks" concept in 1973 in our "The Network City". 2/ Guang Ying Mo and 
I are just finishing a paper for ICS on multilevel, multimember networks.]


Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond (by Sonia Shah)

    Scientists agree that a pathogen is likely to cause a global pandemic in the near future. But which one? And how?

Over the past fifty years, more than three hundred infectious diseases have either newly emerged or reemerged, appearing in territories where they˙˙ve never been seen before. Ninety percent of epidemiologists expect that one of them will cause a deadly pandemic sometime in the next two generations. It could be Ebola, avian flu, a drug-resistant superbug, or something completely new. While we can˙˙t know which pathogen will cause the next pandemic, by unraveling the story of how pathogens have caused pandemics in the past, we can make predictions about the future. In this book Shah interweaves history, original reportage, and personal narrative to explore the origins of contagions, drawing parallels between cholera, one of history˙˙s most deadly and disruptive pandemic-causing pathogens, and the new diseases that stalk humankind today.

To reveal how a new pandemic might develop, Shah tracks each stage of cholera˙˙s dramatic journey, from its emergence in the South Asian hinterlands as a harmless microbe to its rapid dispersal across the nineteenth-century world, all the way to its latest beachhead in Haiti. Along the way she reports on the pathogens now following in cholera˙˙s footsteps, from the MRSA bacterium that besieges her own family to the never-before-seen killers coming out of China˙˙s wet markets, the surgical wards of New Delhi, and the suburban backyards of the East Coast.

By delving into the convoluted science, strange politics, and checkered history of one of the world˙˙s deadliest diseases, Pandemic reveals what the next global contagion might look like˙˙ and what we can do to prevent it.

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=2abea2fa97&e=55e25a0e3e) , via CxBooks (http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=7d685d9e24&e=55e25a0e3e)



==============================================
Sponsored by the Complex Systems Society.
Founding Editor: Gottfried Mayer.
Editor-in-Chief: Carlos Gershenson.

You can contribute to Complexity Digest selecting one of our topics (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=0da032d073&e=55e25a0e3e ) and using the "Suggest" button.
==============================================
==============================================

_____________________________________________________________________
SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008, Week 62
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.UFL.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager