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SOCNET  April 2016

SOCNET April 2016

Subject:

selected Latest Complexity Digest Posts (fwd)

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 25 Apr 2016 10:25:26 -0400

Content-Type:

MULTIPART/MIXED

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Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (169 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

   Barry Wellman

    A vision is just a vision if it's only in your head
    Step by step, link by link, putting it together
                  Streisand/Sondheim
  _______________________________________________________________________
   NetLab Network                 FRSC                      INSNA Founder
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman           twitter: @barrywellman
   NETWORKED: The New Social Operating System  Lee Rainie & Barry Wellman
                        http://amzn.to/zXZg39
   _______________________________________________________________________


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 11:04:32 +0000
From: "[utf-8] Complexity Digest" <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: [log in to unmask]
To: "[utf-8] Barry" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: [utf-8] Latest Complexity Digest Posts

Learn about the latest and greatest related to complex systems research. More at http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=badbd830ae&e=55e25a0e3e



Why Physics Is Not a Discipline 

    Saying that physics knows no boundaries is not the same as saying that 
physicists can solve everything. They too have been brought up inside a 
discipline, and are as prone as any of us to blunder when they step 
outside. The issue is not who ˙˙owns˙˙ particular problems in science, but 
about developing useful tools for thinking about how things work˙˙which is 
what Aristotle tried to do over two millennia ago. Physics is not what 
happens in the Department of Physics. The world really doesn˙˙t care about 
labels, and if we want to understand it then neither should we.


http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=373bd1f11b&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=897cb248ad&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=ff1acca7e1&e=55e25a0e3e)



An Experimental Study of Team Size and Performance on a Complex Task

    The relationship between team size and productivity is a question of 
broad relevance across economics, psychology, and management science. For 
complex tasks, however, where both the potential benefits and costs of 
coordinated work increase with the number of workers, neither theoretical 
arguments nor empirical evidence consistently favor larger vs. smaller 
teams. Experimental findings, meanwhile, have relied on small groups and 
highly stylized tasks, hence are hard to generalize to realistic settings. 
Here we narrow the gap between real-world task complexity and experimental 
control, reporting results from an online experiment in which 47 teams of 
size ranging from n = 1 to 32 collaborated on a realistic crisis mapping 
task. We find that individuals in teams exerted lower overall effort than 
independent workers, in part by allocating their effort to less demanding 
(and less productive) sub-tasks; however, we also find that individuals in 
teams collaborated more with increasing team size. Directly comparing 
these competing effects, we find that the largest teams outperformed an 
equivalent number of independent workers, suggesting that gains to 
collaboration dominated losses to effort. Importantly, these teams also 
performed comparably to a field deployment of crisis mappers, suggesting 
that experiments of the type described here can help solve practical 
problems as well as advancing the science of collective intelligence.


Mao A, Mason W, Suri S, Watts DJ (2016) An Experimental Study of Team Size and Performance on a Complex Task. PLoS ONE 11(4): e0153048. http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=410899f0f7&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=eb9573b241&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=23369e4af3&e=55e25a0e3e)


Control of complex networks requires both structure and dynamics

    The study of network structure has uncovered signatures of the 
organization of complex systems. However, there is also a need to 
understand how to control them; for example, identifying strategies to 
revert a diseased cell to a healthy state, or a mature cell to a 
pluripotent state. Two recent methodologies suggest that the 
controllability of complex systems can be predicted solely from the graph 
of interactions between variables, without considering their dynamics: 
structural controllability and minimum dominating sets. We demonstrate 
that such structure-only methods fail to characterize controllability when 
dynamics are introduced. We study Boolean network ensembles of network 
motifs as well as three models of biochemical regulation: the segment 
polarity network in Drosophila melanogaster, the cell cycle of budding 
yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the floral organ arrangement in 
Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that structure-only methods both 
undershoot and overshoot the number and which sets of critical variables 
best control the dynamics of these models, highlighting the importance of 
the actual system dynamics in determining control. Our analysis further 
shows that the logic of automata transition functions, namely how 
canalizing they are, plays an important role in the extent to which 
structure predicts dynamics.


Control of complex networks requires both structure and dynamics
Alexander J. Gates & Luis M. Rocha
Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 24456 (2016)
http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=f5b9300820&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=a85fd13ebc&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Papers (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=fff46b87bc&e=55e25a0e3e)



Challenges in Data Science
International Conference

    The main objective of the meeting is the  exploration of the multiple methodological intersections that have been devised in the diverse areas to provide insights regarding e.g. acquisition and analysis of complex networks, resilience and vulnerability, cybersecurity and privacy. Data Science & Complex Systems Science can borrow new ideas and techniques from each other contributing to the synergetic comprehension of both disciplines.  Complex Systems Science is mainly expected to contribute a new paradigms for representing and extracting information about structures and dynamics characterized by interacting elements, thus providing new clues in classical data mining tasks like classification or regression.  Ultimate aim of the meeting is to discuss current understanding and devise further applications of data science in  mapping complex networks evolution and interaction.


Challenges in Data Science
International Conference
July 8-11, 2016
Basilicata
Italy

http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=043d0871d2&e=55e25a0e3e (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=4090195e78&e=55e25a0e3e)

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=d17fd97549&e=55e25a0e3e) , via CxConferences (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=fd3429abbc&e=55e25a0e3e)



How megacities are changing the map of the world

    "I want you to reimagine how life is organized on earth," says global strategist Parag Khanna. As our expanding cities grow ever more connected through transportation, energy and communications networks, we evolve from geography to what he calls "connectography." This emerging global network civilization holds the promise of reducing pollution and inequality ˙˙ and even overcoming geopolitical rivalries. In this talk, Khanna asks us to embrace a new maxim for the future: "Connectivity is destiny."


http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=e64f80a57b&e=55e25a0e3e

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=cec15d6a5a&e=55e25a0e3e) , via Talks (http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=8121fa173d&e=55e25a0e3e)



Evolution: Taxonomies of cognition

    In Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?, ethologist Frans de Waal celebrates the evolution of intelligence in nature. His is an entertaining account of how octopuses escape from jars by unscrewing the lids and rooks drop pebbles into a tube to access floating rewards. Natural selection, he argues, shapes cognitive abilities in the same way as it shapes traits such as wing length. As animals' challenges and habitats differ, so do their cognitive abilities. This idea, which he calls evolutionary cognition, has gained traction in psychology and biology in the past few decades.


Evolution: Taxonomies of cognition
˙˙ Joan B. Silk
Nature 532, 176 (14 April 2016) http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=9131d351f1&e=55e25a0e3e


Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals are?
Frans de Waal W. W. Norton: 2016.

See it on Scoop.it (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=09fe452638&e=55e25a0e3e) , via CxBooks (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=fa07aeff66&e=55e25a0e3e)



==============================================
Sponsored by the Complex Systems Society.
Founding Editor: Gottfried Mayer.
Editor-in-Chief: Carlos Gershenson.

You can contribute to Complexity Digest selecting one of our topics (http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=fd7e6bb1a3&e=55e25a0e3e ) and using the "Suggest" button.
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