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SOCNET  November 2016

SOCNET November 2016

Subject:

selected Latest Complexity Digest Posts (fwd)

From:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Barry Wellman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 10:38:28 -0500

Content-Type:

MULTIPART/MIXED

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (128 lines)

*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

fyi

   Barry Wellman

    A vision is just a vision if it's only in your head
    Step by step, link by link, putting it together
                  Streisand/Sondheim
  _______________________________________________________________________
   NetLab Network                 FRSC                      INSNA Founder
   http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman           twitter: @barrywellman
   NETWORKED: The New Social Operating System  Lee Rainie & Barry Wellman
                        http://amzn.to/zXZg39
   _______________________________________________________________________


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Mon, 21 Nov 2016 12:02:40 +0000
From: "[utf-8] Complexity Digest" <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: [log in to unmask]
To: "[utf-8] Barry" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: [utf-8] Latest Complexity Digest Posts

Learn about the latest and greatest related to complex systems research. More at http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=b5a1b6f025&e=55e25a0e3e



Circularity and the Micro-Macro-Difference

    Context: Referring to a recent proposition by Kauffman about the 
˙˙fundamental nature of circularity in cybernetics and in scientific work 
in general,˙˙ I try to advance this insight with the help of system 
scientific concepts and a computational model. Problem: Often circularity 
seems to be taken as a metaphor that does not provide a firm 
epistemological base that fosters analysis. Method: The methodology builds 
on mathematics, computer-based modeling, and reasoning. Results: By 
building on conceptual suggestions for grasping the micro-macro difference 
of complex systems in terms of computational power, circularity can be 
conceived of as an emerging macro-level phenomenon. Implications: I show 
that the seemingly irritating - and traditionally evaded - concept of 
circularity is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon in complex systems 
that can be grasped on a firm physical basis open to computational 
analysis. The proposal could support constructivist reasoning and help to 
eventually bridge the disconcerting gap between the humanities and natural 
sciences. Constructivist content: Circularity is a fundamental principle 
in the conception of second-order cybernetics and in particular in the 
observation of observing systems, as suggested by von Foerster. Trying to 
set it up on a firm analytical basis could advance the constructivist 
approach and further support it in becoming the contemporary scientific 
epistemology it deserves to be.


Füllsack M. (2016) Circularity and the Micro-Macro-Difference. Constructivist Foundations 12(1): 1˙˙10. Available at http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=264b92dbcd&e=55e25a0e3e

Source: www.univie.ac.at (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=92b41d759d&e=55e25a0e3e)



Traffic Games: Modeling Freeway Traffic with Game Theory

    We apply game theory to a vehicular traffic model to study the effect 
of driver strategies on traffic flow. The resulting model inherits the 
realistic dynamics achieved by a two-lane traffic model and aims to 
incorporate phenomena caused by driver-driver interactions. To achieve 
this goal, a game-theoretic description of driver interaction was 
developed. This game-theoretic formalization allows one to model different 
lane-changing behaviors and to keep track of mobility performance. We 
simulate the evolution of cooperation, traffic flow, and mobility 
performance for different modeled behaviors. The analysis of these results 
indicates a mobility optimization process achieved by drivers˙˙ 
interactions.


Cortés-Berrueco LE, Gershenson C, Stephens CR (2016) Traffic Games: Modeling Freeway Traffic with Game Theory. PLoS ONE 11(11): e0165381. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0165381

Source: journals.plos.org (http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=ee802ab98b&e=55e25a0e3e)



Twitter Predicts Citation Rates of Ecological Research

    The relationship between traditional metrics of research impact (e.g., 
number of citations) and alternative metrics (altmetrics) such as Twitter 
activity are of great interest, but remain imprecisely quantified. We used 
generalized linear mixed modeling to estimate the relative effects of 
Twitter activity, journal impact factor, and time since publication on Web 
of Science citation rates of 1,599 primary research articles from 20 
ecology journals published from 2012˙˙2014. We found a strong positive 
relationship between Twitter activity (i.e., the number of unique tweets 
about an article) and number of citations. Twitter activity was a more 
important predictor of citation rates than 5-year journal impact factor. 
Moreover, Twitter activity was not driven by journal impact factor; the 
˙˙highest-impact˙˙ journals were not necessarily the most discussed 
online. The effect of Twitter activity was only about a fifth as strong as 
time since publication; accounting for this confounding factor was 
critical for estimating the true effects of Twitter use. Articles in 
impactful journals can become heavily cited, but articles in journals with 
lower impact factors can generate considerable Twitter activity and also 
become heavily cited. Authors may benefit from establishing a strong 
social media presence, but should not expect research to become highly 
cited solely through social media promotion. Our research demonstrates 
that altmetrics and traditional metrics can be closely related, but not 
identical. We suggest that both altmetrics and traditional citation rates 
can be useful metrics of research impact.


Peoples BK, Midway SR, Sackett D, Lynch A, Cooney PB (2016) Twitter Predicts Citation Rates of Ecological Research. PLoS ONE 11(11): e0166570. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0166570

Source: journals.plos.org (http://unam.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=22db4db478&e=55e25a0e3e)



==============================================
Sponsored by the Complex Systems Society.
Founding Editor: Gottfried Mayer.
Editor-in-Chief: Carlos Gershenson.

You can contribute to Complexity Digest selecting one of our topics (http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=c48cddf28b&e=55e25a0e3e ) and using the "Suggest" button.
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