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Subject:

Re: Not ESL, part 1

From:

"Mitchel T. Burchfield" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 27 Jun 1997 13:57:26 -0500

Content-Type:

multipart/mixed

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (240 lines) , National Center for Research in Vocational Ed.. (1).url (240 lines)

Hello Margaret,

Actually, it has been flooding here (close to biblical porportions) lately.
 Ususally it is dry and hot.

Literature about LEP students can be found in various places of course, but
I am posting this web site as a good place to start:

http://vocserve.berkeley.edu/default.html


Some specific articles are:

Lara, J. & Hoffman, E. (1990) February  School Success for limite English
proficient students:  The challenge and state response
Washington D. C. Council of Chief State School Officers

This report decsribes the finings of a survey on limited English proficient
(LEP) activities in state education agencies.  It includes an overview of
the current state of LEP programs, a description of the LEP population,
survey description of findings, a sampling of promising approaches in four
states, and a REFERECE list.  It can be used by state agency personnel
seeking current imformation on the practice of LEP-related programs
including bilingual education, vocational education, special education,
migrant education, and compensatory education/Chapter I.  Ten
recommendations are provided to challenge the leadership in each state
education agency to make the education of every LEP child to his or her
maximum potential both a priority and a reality.

56 pages
Coucil of Chief State School Officers, 379 Hall of States, 400 N. Capitol
Street, N.W., Washington D.C. 20001-1511
phone 202-393-8159

Special Issues Analysis Center 1989, September
At-risk students: The special case of the LEP students (special report D)
Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs
This report overviews the dropout problem among students with limited
English proficiency (LEP).  Included are discussions of the following: (1)
esitmates on the number of LEP dropouts, (2) availability and range of
services for at-risk students, (3) risk factors for dropping out of school,
(4) programmatic services provided at-risk LEP students, and (5) success in
dropout prevention programs and services.  Refences and additional
RESOURCES are included.  18 pages
Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, 400 Maryland
Avenue, S.W., Switzer Bldg., Room 5086, Wahington D.C. 20202-2518  phone
202-732-7500

I did a search on the NCRVE home hage and found over 170 articles with a
serch of LEP.  I am sure you can narrow down the search to specific
articles dealing with higher ed if you want to Margaret.  The Texas Higher
Education Coordinating Board may know of some workshops in your region too.

----------
> From: Margaret Clark <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Not ESL, part 1
> Date: Friday, June 27, 1997 8:44 AM
>
> Greetings, Mitchell; I bet y'all are a lot drier down there than we are
> in Houston -- but maybe not much cooler?
>
> Thanks so much for your information. You wouldn't have any titles or
> authors, by any chance? I wondered -- does the designation LEP
> distinguish between writing and speaking skills? Would it apply to
> American born students of any hue who have only partial understanding of
> "SEAE", and no acquaitance at all with academia?
>
> I'm delighted to hear your comments on developmental writers. I couldn't
> agree more. Teaching these folks is the best thing I've ever done.
>
> Margaret
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
> On Thu, 26 Jun 1997, Mitchel T. Burchfield wrote:
>
> > I read your comments with interest because I have observed some of the
same
> > problems with the population of students that I have worked with here
in
> > Southwest Texas over the last ten years teaching developmental English
> > courses.  Some of your students sound to me like they would fit the
> > category of LEP (Limited English Proficiency).  There is a fair amount
of
> > literature on these types of students available for you to peruse and
> > choose appropriate methods from.  There are at least three levels of
> > performance for LEP students that are typically identified and each
level
> > has various suggested strategies --one level is where the student can
read
> > the textbook and do the exercises with a relative degree of
independence
> > (80% proficiency/comprehension), another level is where the material in
the
> > textbook really needs to be interpreted by the teacher for it to make
sense
> > to the students and guided practice is indicated (60%+ comprehension,
the
> > last level is the frustration level for the student and it is
recommended
> > that the instructor may have to actually rewrite portions of the
textbook
> > to make it understandable to the student with particular attention to
> > cultural and language influences.  These student are very different
from
> > ESL students and yes they are nottypically great at academic writing,
but
> > that is the challenge that we live for --right!!
> >
> > Anyway this stuff was just off the top of my head and you should look
into
> > the literature..
> > I do not teach as much as I used to, since I am more involved in
> > administrative activities, but I really think that teaching
developmental
> > writing is the most interesting thing I have ever done.  My students
were
> > predominantly Hispanic and together my students and I have had very
> > successful experiences.  85-90% of the graduates from the developmental
> > English classes pass their freshman English course the first time they
take
> > it.
> >
> > Good luck
> >
> > ----------
> > > From: Margaret Clark <[log in to unmask]>
> > > To: [log in to unmask]
> > > Subject: Not ESL, part 1
> > > Date: Thursday, June 26, 1997 5:53 PM
> > >
> > > This is such a hugely long post; I do apologize. But I have a snarly
> > > little issue that I'd dearly love to hear from you about, and it
takes a
> > > bit of explaining. If you have the time and the patience, please read
on.
> > >
> > > I teach dev. writing at Univ. of Houston-Downtown. I was hired
because I
> > > had lots of experience in ESL composition. I've been at this campus
for
> > > more than 5 years. In this time I've become convinced that the
students I
> > > typically teach are often not ESL at all, and I think this is a real
> > > problem. I'd be so grateful to you all if you could help me sort out
my
> > > thinking on this.
> > >
> > > Here are some examples of the kinds of students I see.
> > >         - Spanish-English speakers, born in the US, and fluent in
both
> > > languages from birth. Spoken English shows only a trace of Spanish
> > > accent. They almost always are also fluent in Spanglish -- which is,
in
> > > the estimation of most linguits I know of, a genuine dialect.
> > >         - Asian immigrant students who have been in the US for
anywhere
> > > from 5 to 15 years. They are graduates of local high schools. They
are
> > > completlely fluent in both languages, but their spoken English may be
> > > heavily accented -- then again, it may not.
> > >         - African-American students, born in the US, speak English
only,
> > but
> > > it is heavily accented and is considered by many to be a dialect (ok,
> > it's
> > > Ebonic, I guess, but no one here would call it that) because of
certain
> > > rule-governed differences from Standard Edited American English
(SEAE) in
> > > syntax and vocabulary.
> > >
> > > Another characteristic that all these students share is that they are
> > > first generation college students. Also, to put it bluntly, none of
them
> > > are any good at all at writing academic English, in terms of both
> > > appropriate content and usage.
> > >
> > > There are other students in my classes who resemble more closely what
I
> > > think of as ESL -- adults here on student visas from various
countries,
> > > completed secondary ed in their home country. Some of these guys
would be
> > > more successful in traditional ESL classes, but we don't always have
the
> > > option of sending them there -- don't ask why, it's complicated,
boring,
> > > and another issue. These students, as are many ESL students, are
often
> > > highly educated in their home countries, or are from educated,
wealthy
> > > families who can support their American education. They may be
Chinese,
> > > Japanese, African, South American (pardon the slippage between
countries
> > > and continents -- it's a kind of shorthand), sometimes, but seldom,
> > > European.
> > >
> > > Here's my problem. The first group is usually called "ESL". I don't
think
> > > they are. They are taught according to ESL premises, given textbooks
with
> > > "ESL" on the cover or that contain chapters on "ESL tips" --
articles, or
> > > verb tenses.
> > >
> > > Are they really ESL students? In two of the three types, English is
_not_
> > > their second language. The Asian immigrants, who were at one time
truly
> > > ESL, conduct all daily business easily in English. I think they are
evn
> > > beyond what we might call "advanced ESL". I haven't seen any studies,
but
> > > I believe that the English they speak is also a dialect, like
Spanglish.
> > >
> > > Could we possibly call these students bi- or multi-dialectal instaed
of
> > > -lingual? And if we did, would it change the way we taught them?
> > >
> > > This is such a long post, and it's really only the first part:
defining
> > > the students is kind of tricky. Next, if you can take it and are
> > > interested, I'd like to talk about the problems I think we may be
> > > causing by treating these not-ESL students as though they were ESL.
> > >
> > > Do you have any ideas on this? Any experiences, observations or
questions
> > > of your own relevant to this issue? I'd really like to hear from you.
> > >
> > > Thanks so much --
> > >
> > > Margaret Clark
> > > Univ. of Houston-Downtown
> > > [log in to unmask]
> >

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