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Subject:

Re: LRNASST Digest - 4 Jan 1999 to 5 Jan 1999

From:

Gladys Shaw <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 6 Jan 1999 08:30:50 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (728 lines)

Happy New Year everybody!!Just want to let you know that the Tutor
Certificaton Committee compiled a selected bibliography for tutor training.
It is available for $5 to cover printing and postage. It may be  useful for
those of you planning new training or revising existing training programs.
Those of you who already have certified programs may be interested in
joining the ITCP Committee; we can always use more members.

Also, I am recruiting colleagues to serve on the new Mentor Certification
Committee - those of you who have been running mentor programs and who are
willing to get your mentor training program certified between now and
August.Serving on the committee is a very rewarding experience; you expand
your network and get tons of wonderful training ideas.

So-o-o, start l999 right; commit to making a contribution to the profession
and
gaining some personal professional development along the way. Anyone
interested can contact me directly ([log in to unmask]) but please include a
mailing address, phone and fax.

700, you wrote:
>Date:     Wed, 6 Jan 1999 00:00:34 -0700
>Reply-To: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
<[log in to unmask]>
>Sender:   Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
<[log in to unmask]>
>From:     Automatic digest processor <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject:  LRNASST Digest - 4 Jan 1999 to 5 Jan 1999
>To:       Recipients of LRNASST digests <[log in to unmask]>
>
>There are 16 messages totalling 697 lines in this issue.
>
>Topics of the day:
>
>  1. COMPASS Writing Skills Placement Test (2)
>  2. Report on Remedial Education (8)
>  3. Learning Style Assessment (2)
>  4. Reasonable Accommodation: A Question (3)
>  5. Remedial Education-learning disabilities
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 05:43:51 -0500
>From:    Carol Schour <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: COMPASS Writing Skills Placement Test
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
>
>Right before Thanksgiving I sent the following message, and received
>very few comments.  I thought I would try again, since our committee is
>meeting later this month:
>
>
>We recently purchased the COMPASS placement tests from ACT.  We are
>interested in other schools' cut-off scores for the Writing Skills
>Placement Test and, if possible, the reasoning that went into choosing
>those cut-off scores.
>
>Thanks!
>
>Carol Schour
>Learning Center Director
>The College of Saint Rose
>432 Western Ave
>Albany, NY  12203
>518-458-5305
>[log in to unmask]
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 11:47:17 -0500
>From:    Ann Bohling <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
>
>        I would be interested have some reactions/opinions to the report
>posted to the list.  I found it to be very comprehensive, and some of the
>data could be used effectively to help bolster the cause of dev. ed. when
>under attack from administration.  I think one of the biggest hurdles is
>getting the public/political opinion to understand that remediation has
>had a long history at the college level.  To portray it as a "current"
>trend in higher ed., does a grave injustice to those who are seeking to
>better their quality of life by obtaining a college education---even if
>it means completing "remediation" when they first enter college.  Learning,
>along with success happens in many different ways.
>
>Ann Bohling
>Reading Specialist/Tutor Coordinator
>SUNY Morrisville
>Morrisville, NY  13408
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 11:46:55 -0600
>From:    June Haynes <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Learning Style Assessment
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>I am needing some information on Learning Style Assessment software.  I
>am interested in finding out what software programs are available and if
>they have been used and how good they are in particular.
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 12:18:17 -0600
>From:    "Gail M. Platt, Ph.D." <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>Ann Bohling wrote:
>>
>>         I would be interested have some reactions/opinions to the report
>> posted to the list.  I found it to be very comprehensive, and some of the
>> data could be used effectively to help bolster the cause of dev. ed. when
>> under attack from administration.  I think one of the biggest hurdles is
>> getting the public/political opinion to understand that remediation has
>> had a long history at the college level.  To portray it as a "current"
>> trend in higher ed., does a grave injustice to those who are seeking to
>> better their quality of life by obtaining a college education---even if
>> it means completing "remediation" when they first enter college.  Learning,
>> along with success happens in many different ways.
>>
>> Ann Bohling
>> Reading Specialist/Tutor Coordinator
>> SUNY Morrisville
>> Morrisville, NY  13408
>Ann,
>
>You mention an important fact, that developmental/remedial/compensatory
>education/learning assistance are not "new" to higher education.
>However, I think a factor to take into consideration is the changing
>statistics of the beneficiaries of developmental and remedial education
>in the past versus the present.
>
>In the past, when Harvard (and other prestigious institutions) had
>compensatory programs, they were for the children of the wealthy elite
>and/or alumni (who were elite by virtue of the fact that they graduated
>from Harvard) who needed extra help or additional instruction and
>academic support in order to perform at the expected level after they
>were admitted to the college.
>
>It is a relatively "modern" idea many, if not most, folks can benefit
>from and even need education beyond high school.  Today, in
>open-admissions institutions (particularly community colleges), many of
>the beneficiaries of developmental and/or remedial education are not
>wealthy, white, upper-middle class, etc.  The characteristics of the
>beneficiaries have changed and this becomes a political issue.  It
>appears to be an important factor for many legislators (and others) who
>ask questions about "Who can benefit from higher education?" and "Who
>really belongs in college?"
>
>As developmental educators, we should be optimistic, but we cannot
>afford to be naive.
>
>Gail Platt, Ph.D.
>South Plains College
>[log in to unmask]
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 11:23:04 -0700
>From:    "McGowan, Marla Jo" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Learning Style Assessment
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain
>
>I would appreciate having this same information. Thank you,
>Marla Jo McGowan, Director
>Academic Support & Testing Center
>Colorado Christian University
>180 S Garrison St
>Lakewood, CO  80226
>303-963-3265
>[log in to unmask]
>
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: June Haynes [SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 1999 10:47 AM
>> To:   [log in to unmask]
>> Subject:      Learning Style Assessment
>>
>> I am needing some information on Learning Style Assessment software.  I
>> am interested in finding out what software programs are available and if
>> they have been used and how good they are in particular.
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 15:30:05 -0500
>From:    "Gary K. Probst" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>Ann Bohling wrote:  I would be interested have some reactions/opinions to the
>report posted to the list.
>
>Gary Probst replied:
>
>What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
>remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to
enter
>the college because they are learning disabled.  If trained special education
>teachers cannot teach these students to learn to add, subtract, multiply, and
>divide in 12 years, what can part-time instructors with a math degree do to
>teach these skills in one semester?
>
>The current trend in some places in developmental education is to admit
anyone
>as a developmental student and be blamed for their lack of success.  What
need
>to be done is define what is required to be successful in a college
>developmental program.
>
>
>>
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 12:43:26 -0800
>From:    Lonna Smith <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>Gary K. Probst wrote:
>>
>> Ann Bohling wrote:  I would be interested have some reactions/opinions
to the
>> report posted to the list.
>>
>> Gary Probst replied:
>>
>> What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
>> remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to
enter
>> the college because they are learning disabled.
>
>
>I have had many students with learning disabilities who have experienced
great
>success.  When given the accommodations they need, and when they feel
>comfortable coming to me for help, most students do well.  Yes, some have
>learning disabilities that make higher education a torturous route, but most
>do just fine.
>
>I think it's a disservice to stereotype students with learning disabilities.
>
>Lonna Smith
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 16:15:48 -0500
>From:    Liam Cadegan <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Reasonable Accommodation: A Question
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>Theorectical Question
>
>A student enrolls in a course and fails.  The student enrolls again,
>requests a tutor, meets with the tutor regularly, and fails again.  The
>student enrolls again...
>
>Is there a time when providing the reasonable accommodation is no longer a
>necessity?
>
>Or is it necessary to provide the accommodation no matter how many times a
>student fails a particular course?
>
>I think the answers to these questions are fairly straight forward.
>
>Thornier Question
>
>A student continues to fail despite being provided all reasonable
>accommodations.  An underlying assumption here is that the student does have
>particular deficits that make achieving a passing grade all but impossible.
>How does one advise such a student?  If a student truly doesn't have the
>capacity for the task, is there a legal way to advise the student to pursue
>a different option.  And if the student chooses not to pursue a different
>option... back to the original question.
>
>Any answers?
>
>Any resource suggestions?
>
>Thank you for taking a moment to consider the questions.
>
>Regards,
>
>Liam Cadegan
>************************************
>Liam Cadegan
>Coordinator, Learning Support Center
>Northwest State Community College
>Archbold, OH
>[log in to unmask]
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 16:49:48 -0400
>From:    "Dr. Karen Smith" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Remedial Education-learning disabilities
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>Gary Probst replied to Ann Bohling and wrote:
>
>
>>What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
>>remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to
enter
>>the college because they are learning disabled.  If trained special
education
>>teachers cannot teach these students to learn to add, subtract, multiply,
and
>>divide in 12 years, what can part-time instructors with a math degree do to
>>teach these skills in one semester?
>>
>>The current trend in some places in developmental education is to admit
anyone
>>as a developmental student and be blamed for their lack of success.  What
need
>>to be done is define what is required to be successful in a college
>>developmental program.
>
>
>My comments which follow are an aside to the discussion on remedial
>education, but the second sentence in Gary's quote disturbs me greatly.
>Students coming from special education are not necessarily learning
>disabled, nor are learning disabled students likely to be from special
>education.  The definition of learning disabled provided by the National
>Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD, 1994) states:
>
>"Learning disabilities is a general term that refers to a heterogeneous
>group of disorders manifested by significant difficulties in the
>acquisition and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, or
>mathematical abilities.  The disorders are intrinsic to the individual,
>presumed to be due to central nervous system dysfunction, and may occur
>across the life span.  .... Although learning disabilities may occur
>concomitantly with other handicapping conditions (for example, sensory
>impairments, mental retardation, serious emotional disturbance) or with
>extrinsic influences (such as cultural differences, insufficient or
>inappropriate instruction), they are not the result of those conditions or
>influences."
>
>I'm surprised at Gary's quote of "20% of the students in the remedial
>classes (in one community college) are special education graduates", with
>the assumption that they are also learning disabled and therefore not able
>to function in college.  Too many individuals confuse learning disabilities
>with being un- or under-prepared, with being mentally incapable of
>learning.
>
>However, many, many students with very high SAT and ACT scores are also
>learning disabled, struggling through their disabilites, and learning to
>cope well within higher education.  We have seen many learning disabled
>students graduate with honors in well-recognized universities (Rutgers
>University, for one), and many have gone on to complete law school and earn
>medical degrees, as well.  This population of individuals deserve our
>respect and concern, not condemnation.
>
>Having a learning disability in no way equates to being unable to learn in
>college.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>>
>>
>>>
>
>
>Karen G. Smith
>Rutgers University's Learning Resource Centers
>[log in to unmask]
><http://lrc.rutgers.edu>
><http://pass.rutgers.edu>
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 16:48:42 -0500
>From:    "Patricia D. Bright" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: COMPASS Writing Skills Placement Test
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>Carol,
>
>A few years ago, I worked at a college that used the COMPASS test.  I'll
>see if I can find any of the material we used for evaluating the program
>and forward the information you request.  If I can't find anything
>myself, I'll see if any of my colleagues at that school are still using
>the program.
>
>Patricia Bright
>Washington & Jefferson College
>[log in to unmask]
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 17:14:48 -0500
>From:    "Patricia D. Bright" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>Lonna,
>
>I don't believe Gary's comments were meant to express a stereotype of
learning
>disabled students.  I have formerly worked in a community/junior college
setting
>where students who were correctly identified as special education in the
secondary
>schools were labeled "learning disabled" for admissions purposes.  In
these cases, I
>believe the student has been done a disservice because, frankly, we
haven't been
>able to give them the type of education they were paying for.
>
>Patricia Bright
>Washington & Jefferson College
>[log in to unmask]
>
>
>
>Lonna Smith wrote:
>
>> Gary K. Probst wrote:
>> >
>> > Ann Bohling wrote:  I would be interested have some reactions/opinions
to the
>> > report posted to the list.
>> >
>> > Gary Probst replied:
>> >
>> > What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the
students in
>> > remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted
to enter
>> > the college because they are learning disabled.
>>
>> I have had many students with learning disabilities who have experienced
great
>> success.  When given the accommodations they need, and when they feel
>> comfortable coming to me for help, most students do well.  Yes, some have
>> learning disabilities that make higher education a torturous route, but
most
>> do just fine.
>>
>> I think it's a disservice to stereotype students with learning
disabilities.
>>
>> Lonna Smith
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 17:20:40 -0500
>From:    Khaki Wunderlich <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Reasonable Accommodation: A Question
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain
>
>Liam, I assume by your use of the term "reasonable accommodations" that
>the student you have in mind has a documented disability.
>
>The simple answer is "yes", you must continue to provide reasonable
>accommodations as long as the student is otherwise qualified and not in
>violation of policies related to retaking courses, pursuit of program,
>academic standards, etc.
>
>To answer a question related to a particular student, you must look to
>your school's policies and the student's disability on a case-by-case
>basis.  How many times is a student without a disability allowed to
>retake a course?  If you have no policy in place for all students, tread
>very lightly in creating a policy in reaction to this student.
>
>Has anyone looked at the accommodations provided in relation to the
>objectives and requirements of the course?  Perhaps a change is in
>order.
>
>Be very careful about "advising" the student, particularly advising away
>from a particular program or career path.  Perhaps consideration of a
>course substitution is appropriate, depending on the program,
>disability, etc.  Again, what is your school's policy?
>
>I suggest discussing the case you have in mind with the person on your
>campus charged with determination of disability services.  Good luck.
>
>>>> Liam Cadegan <[log in to unmask]> 01/05 4:15 PM >>>
>Theorectical Question
>
>A student enrolls in a course and fails.  The student enrolls again,
>requests a tutor, meets with the tutor regularly, and fails again.  The
>student enrolls again...
>
>Is there a time when providing the reasonable accommodation is no longer
>a
>necessity?
>
>Or is it necessary to provide the accommodation no matter how many times
>a
>student fails a particular course?
>
>I think the answers to these questions are fairly straight forward.
>
>Thornier Question
>
>A student continues to fail despite being provided all reasonable
>accommodations.  An underlying assumption here is that the student does
>have
>particular deficits that make achieving a passing grade all but
>impossible.
>How does one advise such a student?  If a student truly doesn't have the
>capacity for the task, is there a legal way to advise the student to
>pursue
>a different option.  And if the student chooses not to pursue a
>different
>option... back to the original question.
>
>Any answers?
>
>Any resource suggestions?
>
>Thank you for taking a moment to consider the questions.
>
>Regards,
>
>Liam Cadegan
>************************************
>Liam Cadegan
>Coordinator, Learning Support Center
>Northwest State Community College
>Archbold, OH
>[log in to unmask]
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 16:31:35 -0600
>From:    Maureen Connolly <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>I disagree because I think learning disabled students can be successful with
>appropriate support mechanisms in place.  The greater problem, I think, is
with
>students of  borderline intelligence.  Transitional planning, which is
required by
>law, often leads these students to consider careers requiring extensive
college
>education.  I have often been told that students have a right to fail, but
how
>does that help their self-esteem?   In addition, failure rates in
developmental
>classes may be higher because many of these students cannot be successful
in the
>most basic classes.
>
>Maureen Connolly
>
>Gary K. Probst wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Gary Probst replied:
>>
>> What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
>> remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to
enter
>> the college because they are learning disabled.  If trained special
education
>> teachers cannot teach these students to learn to add, subtract,
multiply, and
>> divide in 12 years, what can part-time instructors with a math degree do to
>> teach these skills in one semester?
>>
>>
>>
>> >
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 16:49:52 -0800
>From:    Lonna Smith <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>Maureen Connolly wrote:
>>
>> I disagree because I think learning disabled students can be successful
with
>> appropriate support mechanisms in place.  The greater problem, I think,
is with
>> students of  borderline intelligence.
>
>
>I share Maureen's concern.  On rare occasions (one case was last semester), I
>have had students who, in my opinion, do not have the capacity to learn
>college material. In addition, I had a close relationship with a student who
>has such extreme learning disabilities that, despite tutoring and other
>accommodations, she cannot progress to college level math and usually has to
>take her other courses 2-3 times before she passes them.  No one "levels"
with
>these students, and they become more and more frustrated as they pursue a
>profession for which they need a degree.
>
>Of course, these students are in the minority, and most students achieve
their
>goals, but what do we do with the ones who can't?
>
>Lonna Smith
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 17:42:41 -1000
>From:    "John M. Flanigan" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Reasonable Accommodation: A Question
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
>
>Just a thought... What would we think of a doctor, a lawyer, a parent, ...
>who continued cooperating in an activity that they had good reason to
>believe was doing no good for the recipient, and, indeed, might be
>avoiding tougher decisions that might actually do some good? Am I too
>cynical in thinking that as long as long as someone keeps paying the
>bills, it's OK? I'm very troubled by the fact that we seem to have no good
>alternatives.
>
>John M. Flanigan <[log in to unmask]>     The equation is the final arbiter.
>Assistant Professor, Mathematics                    --Werner Heisenberg
>Kapi'olani Community College            The scoreboard is the final arbiter.
>Honolulu, Hawaii                                    --Bill Walton
>
>
>On Tue, 5 Jan 1999, Khaki Wunderlich wrote:
>
>> Liam, I assume by your use of the term "reasonable accommodations" that
>> the student you have in mind has a documented disability.
>>
>> The simple answer is "yes", you must continue to provide reasonable
>> accommodations as long as the student is otherwise qualified and not in
>> violation of policies related to retaking courses, pursuit of program,
>> academic standards, etc.
>>
>> To answer a question related to a particular student, you must look to
>> your school's policies and the student's disability on a case-by-case
>> basis.  How many times is a student without a disability allowed to
>> retake a course?  If you have no policy in place for all students, tread
>> very lightly in creating a policy in reaction to this student.
>>
>> Has anyone looked at the accommodations provided in relation to the
>> objectives and requirements of the course?  Perhaps a change is in
>> order.
>>
>> Be very careful about "advising" the student, particularly advising away
>> from a particular program or career path.  Perhaps consideration of a
>> course substitution is appropriate, depending on the program,
>> disability, etc.  Again, what is your school's policy?
>>
>> I suggest discussing the case you have in mind with the person on your
>> campus charged with determination of disability services.  Good luck.
>>
>> >>> Liam Cadegan <[log in to unmask]> 01/05 4:15 PM >>>
>> Theorectical Question
>>
>> A student enrolls in a course and fails.  The student enrolls again,
>> requests a tutor, meets with the tutor regularly, and fails again.  The
>> student enrolls again...
>>
>> Is there a time when providing the reasonable accommodation is no longer
>> a
>> necessity?
>>
>> Or is it necessary to provide the accommodation no matter how many times
>> a
>> student fails a particular course?
>>
>> I think the answers to these questions are fairly straight forward.
>>
>> Thornier Question
>>
>> A student continues to fail despite being provided all reasonable
>> accommodations.  An underlying assumption here is that the student does
>> have
>> particular deficits that make achieving a passing grade all but
>> impossible.
>> How does one advise such a student?  If a student truly doesn't have the
>> capacity for the task, is there a legal way to advise the student to
>> pursue
>> a different option.  And if the student chooses not to pursue a
>> different
>> option... back to the original question.
>>
>> Any answers?
>>
>> Any resource suggestions?
>>
>> Thank you for taking a moment to consider the questions.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Liam Cadegan
>> ************************************
>> Liam Cadegan
>> Coordinator, Learning Support Center
>> Northwest State Community College
>> Archbold, OH
>> [log in to unmask]
>>
>Date:    Tue, 5 Jan 1999 19:48:10 -0800
>From:    Bev Krieger <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Report on Remedial Education
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
>
>> Gary Probst replied:
>>
>> What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
>> remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to
enter
>> the college because they are learning disabled.  If trained special
education
>> teachers cannot teach these students to learn to add, subtract,
multiply, and
>> divide in 12 years, what can part-time instructors with a math degree do to
>> teach these skills in one semester?
>>
>> The current trend in some places in developmental education is to admit
anyone
>> as a developmental student and be blamed for their lack of success.
What need
>> to be done is define what is required to be successful in a college
>> developmental program.
>>
>I agree with Gary to a point.  However, I have encountered students who
>were graduates of special education who had simply been misdiagnosed.
>However, that seems to occur more in the language arts (at least from my
>experience).  Unfortunately, our institution has an open door policy and
>also the philosophy that everyone has the right to fail.  Often these
>folks are given false hopes, and simply set themselves up for failure.
>If you have a limited number of lights to turn on, you cannot create more
>outlets if the potential has already been reached.  How would others
>define what is required to be successful in a college developmental
>program?> > > >
>
>
>
>xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
>x Bev Krieger                     x
>x Kwantlen University College     x
>x ACP Department                  x
>x Langley Campus                  x
>x 12666-72 Avenue                 x
>x Surrey, BC Canada V3W 2M8       x
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