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We encourage our professors to send them out after about four weeks.  At
the learning center, we don't address attendance problems, but the advisors
and others on campus do.  Our warning reports also check off "poor test
results," "poor or late assignments," and "inadequate daily preparation."
We respond to these (esp. poor test results) by sending these students
reminders of our services and sometimes calling them if we know them.
Students may know their grades are suffering, but others on campus need to
know as well in order to provide a safety net.

At 01:19 PM 3/22/2000 -0500, you wrote:
>I work for a small school that collects midterm reports and then distributes
>the deficiencies to the students and advisors.  Usually when the students
>receive the message, there are only 6-5 weeks left in the semester.  Students
>can still withdraw from courses and a large number do so at that time.  We
>are trying to put into place an earlier warning based strictly on attendance
>at the five week mark.
>        My question for other members of this list - is there any information
>showing a correlation between early warnings on grades and retention?  Are
>there other warning systems that work differently? better?
>
>        I also teach General Studies classes and I emphasize that being aware
>of your grade is part of your job as a student.  If your grades are ok, you
>probably do not have to change your study habits...however it they are not
>ok, well "don't expect different results from the same behavior."  When I
>poll my classes, many of the students have no idea of their current standing
>in any given class.
>
>Do other developmental educators see this as a problem for students?
>
>Thank you for your time.
>