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ted panitz wrote:

> Hi Listers,
>
>     IT IS NOT TO LATE TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE DISCUSSION! My web site is
> alive and evolving, with your help.
>
>      If you feel inspired by these testimonials please feel free to e-mail
> me your story regarding CL and I will add it to the site.

Gary Probst replied:

The approach you describe appears to have attributes of the new-new math
program used in some public schools called "fuzzy math."  Reports on these
web sites give the results of "fuzzy math" programs throughout the nation
during the past ten years.

http://www.mathematicallycorrect.com
http://www.eagleforum.org/educate/1999/oct99/math.html
http://www.tppf.org/ecot.html

These web sites document the educational, political and litigation problems
produced by fuzzy math.  A web search using "fuzzy math instruction" will
find over 2000 web sites describing students' problems and repercussions of
this approach to math.

In October, 1999, the documented failure of fuzzy math across the United
States caused over two hundred Professors of Mathematics in American
universities to sign an open letter to the United States Secretary of
Education, Richard Riley, denouncing this approach to math.  Tom Loveless,
Director of Educational Policy at the Brookings Institute also signed this
letter.

http://www.mathematicallycorrect.com/riley.htm

There are national periodicals that have published articles describing the
harm experienced by minorities and at-risk-students given fuzzy math
instruction.  Some of these articles were published in the Harvard
Educational Review and the National Review (December 21, 1998).

After reading your website, I would like to know the following:

1.  Why has fuzzy math, as it is taught in the public school system, failed?

2.  What attributes of fuzzy math do you use in your instructional program?