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>MAGAZINES & JOURNALS
>
>A glance at the summer issue of "American Outlook":
>Too many people go to college
>
>The swelling number of college-bound high-school seniors does
>"serious damage to industry, students, and higher education
>itself," writes William R. Beaver, a professor of social science
>at Robert Morris College.  Enrollment rates have risen
>phenomenally over the past century, writes Mr. Beaver, with 70
>percent of all high-school graduates going on to college. And
>while increased college attendance seems a safe goal to
>politicians, he disagrees that it's for the best. As the last of
>the baby boomers entered college in the 1980's, institutions
>became fearful of not filling their classes, Mr. Beaver says,
>and responded with massive publicity campaigns, lower standards,
>and scholarships -- all to attract "less-qualified students."
>Many of those students couldn't handle the work, he maintains,
>so colleges introduced remedial courses and began inflating
>grades.  The result: "Higher education became less of a haven
>for the elite and the academically qualified and more of an
>expected destination for almost everyone." That change has had a
>"detrimental impact on industry," writes Mr. Beaver, who quotes
>a corporate recruiter noting the shortage of skilled workers.
>Mr. Beaver writes that parents and high-school guidance
>counselors just can't get over the notion that a college degree
>is the way to success, and, therefore, often encourage students
>-- who actually might find higher pay scales as skilled
>industrial workers -- to go to college. Such students waste
>time, he says, and hurt academe. Mr. Beaver warns: "For a
>college education to have meaning, it must be distinctive and
>limited to those with the ability and motivation to pursue it."
>The article is not available online, but more information about
>the magazine may be found at
>http://www.hudson.org/American_Outlook/
>_________________________________________________________________
>
>_________________________________________________________________
>

Norman A. Stahl
Professor and Chair
Literacy Education
GH 223
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115

Phone: (815) 753-9032
FAX:   (815) 753-8563
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