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Thank you Cris.

Sandie

At 12:00 PM 8/14/00 -0500, you wrote:
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>According to this piece from Academe Today, too many people are going to
>college. The author erroneously states that remedial education began in the
>1980s. However, Remedial education actually began much earlier. Harvard
>certainly had remedial education in the 19th century as the doors to higher
>education were opened to immigrants and graduates of the "new" public high
>schools. I'm sure the case was made then, as it is now, that these students
>are being done a disservice by allowing them to think they can attain a
>degree.
>
>If the job of education is merely to provide a skilled workforce, then,
>perhaps, there should be something in addition to college or university
>beyond the trade schools. Of course, the same business leaders who complain
>about a shortage of skilled workers, often set barriers to promotion by
>making a college degree the entrance requirement.
>
>In our teaching experience, haven't we all encountered the student who did
>not apply his/herself in high school or for whatever reason didn't get a
>firm grounding in high school, but had the intelligence, the desire, and the
>will to get an education? Those students benefit from some remedial support
>and go on to become excellent students and productive members of the
>workforce. I believe the real issue is a sense of elitism, that higher
>education is only for a chosen few. What if the division between the highly
>educated and the skilled workforce became too great? The benefits of a
>liberal arts education are to expand the thinking of students; to encourage
>them to think outside the box of a narrow discipline or skill.
>
>No one wants to encourage a student who has no ability whatsoever, but
>should one be so quick to judge?
>
>These are just a few thoughts from a first generation college student who
>didn't need remedial studies but has dedicated her life to helping others
>overcome barriers to higher education.
>Cris
>Cris Richardson
>Assistant Director, Learning Center
>Rogers State University
>1701 W. Will Rogers Blvd.
>Claremore, OK  74017
>918.343.7727
>[log in to unmask]
>www.rsu.edu
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Norman Stahl [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>Sent: Monday, August 14, 2000 8:58 AM
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Another piece from Academe Today for you to consider
>
>
>>MAGAZINES & JOURNALS
>>
>>A glance at the summer issue of "American Outlook":
>>Too many people go to college
>>
>>The swelling number of college-bound high-school seniors does
>>"serious damage to industry, students, and higher education
>>itself," writes William R. Beaver, a professor of social science
>>at Robert Morris College.  Enrollment rates have risen
>>phenomenally over the past century, writes Mr. Beaver, with 70
>>percent of all high-school graduates going on to college. And
>>while increased college attendance seems a safe goal to
>>politicians, he disagrees that it's for the best. As the last of
>>the baby boomers entered college in the 1980's, institutions
>>became fearful of not filling their classes, Mr. Beaver says,
>>and responded with massive publicity campaigns, lower standards,
>>and scholarships -- all to attract "less-qualified students."
>>Many of those students couldn't handle the work, he maintains,
>>so colleges introduced remedial courses and began inflating
>>grades.  The result: "Higher education became less of a haven
>>for the elite and the academically qualified and more of an
>>expected destination for almost everyone." That change has had a
>>"detrimental impact on industry," writes Mr. Beaver, who quotes
>>a corporate recruiter noting the shortage of skilled workers.
>>Mr. Beaver writes that parents and high-school guidance
>>counselors just can't get over the notion that a college degree
>>is the way to success, and, therefore, often encourage students
>>-- who actually might find higher pay scales as skilled
>>industrial workers -- to go to college. Such students waste
>>time, he says, and hurt academe. Mr. Beaver warns: "For a
>>college education to have meaning, it must be distinctive and
>>limited to those with the ability and motivation to pursue it."
>>The article is not available online, but more information about
>>the magazine may be found at
>>http://www.hudson.org/American_Outlook/
>>_________________________________________________________________
>>
>>_________________________________________________________________
>>
>
>Norman A. Stahl
>Professor and Chair
>Literacy Education
>GH 223
>Northern Illinois University
>DeKalb, IL 60115
>
>Phone: (815) 753-9032
>FAX:   (815) 753-8563
>[log in to unmask]
>
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><TITLE>RE: Another piece from Academe Today for you to consider</TITLE>
></HEAD>
><BODY>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>According to this piece from Academe Today, too many =
>people are going to college. The author erroneously states that =
>remedial education began in the 1980s. However, Remedial education =
>actually began much earlier. Harvard certainly had remedial education =
>in the 19th century as the doors to higher education were opened to =
>immigrants and graduates of the &quot;new&quot; public high schools. =
>I'm sure the case was made then, as it is now, that these students are =
>being done a disservice by allowing them to think they can attain a =
>degree.</FONT></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>If the job of education is merely to provide a =
>skilled workforce, then, perhaps, there should be something in addition =
>to college or university beyond the trade schools. Of course, the same =
>business leaders who complain about a shortage of skilled workers, =
>often set barriers to promotion by making a college degree the entrance =
>requirement. </FONT></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>In our teaching experience, haven't we all =
>encountered the student who did not apply his/herself in high school or =
>for whatever reason didn't get a firm grounding in high school, but had =
>the intelligence, the desire, and the will to get an education? Those =
>students benefit from some remedial support and go on to become =
>excellent students and productive members of the workforce. I believe =
>the real issue is a sense of elitism, that higher education is only for =
>a chosen few. What if the division between the highly educated and the =
>skilled workforce became too great? The benefits of a liberal arts =
>education are to expand the thinking of students; to encourage them to =
>think outside the box of a narrow discipline or skill. </FONT></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>No one wants to encourage a student who has no =
>ability whatsoever, but should one be so quick to judge?</FONT>
></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>These are just a few thoughts from a first generation =
>college student who didn't need remedial studies but has dedicated her =
>life to helping others overcome barriers to higher =
>education.</FONT></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Cris</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Cris Richardson</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Assistant Director, Learning Center</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Rogers State University</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>1701 W. Will Rogers Blvd.</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Claremore, OK&nbsp; 74017</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>918.343.7727</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>[log in to unmask]</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>www.rsu.edu</FONT>
></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>-----Original Message-----</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>From: Norman Stahl [<A =
>HREF=3D"mailto:[log in to unmask]">mailto:[log in to unmask]</A>]</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Sent: Monday, August 14, 2000 8:58 AM</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>To: [log in to unmask]</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Subject: Another piece from Academe Today for you to =
>consider</FONT>
></P>
><BR>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;MAGAZINES &amp; JOURNALS</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;A glance at the summer issue of &quot;American =
>Outlook&quot;:</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;Too many people go to college</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;The swelling number of college-bound high-school =
>seniors does</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;&quot;serious damage to industry, students, and =
>higher education</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;itself,&quot; writes William R. Beaver, a =
>professor of social science</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;at Robert Morris College.&nbsp; Enrollment rates =
>have risen</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;phenomenally over the past century, writes Mr. =
>Beaver, with 70</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;percent of all high-school graduates going on to =
>college. And</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;while increased college attendance seems a safe =
>goal to</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;politicians, he disagrees that it's for the =
>best. As the last of</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;the baby boomers entered college in the 1980's, =
>institutions</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;became fearful of not filling their classes, Mr. =
>Beaver says,</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;and responded with massive publicity campaigns, =
>lower standards,</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;and scholarships -- all to attract =
>&quot;less-qualified students.&quot;</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;Many of those students couldn't handle the work, =
>he maintains,</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;so colleges introduced remedial courses and =
>began inflating</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;grades.&nbsp; The result: &quot;Higher education =
>became less of a haven</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;for the elite and the academically qualified and =
>more of an</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;expected destination for almost everyone.&quot; =
>That change has had a</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;&quot;detrimental impact on industry,&quot; =
>writes Mr. Beaver, who quotes</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;a corporate recruiter noting the shortage of =
>skilled workers.</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;Mr. Beaver writes that parents and high-school =
>guidance</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;counselors just can't get over the notion that a =
>college degree</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;is the way to success, and, therefore, often =
>encourage students</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;-- who actually might find higher pay scales as =
>skilled</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;industrial workers -- to go to college. Such =
>students waste</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;time, he says, and hurt academe. Mr. Beaver =
>warns: &quot;For a</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;college education to have meaning, it must be =
>distinctive and</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;limited to those with the ability and motivation =
>to pursue it.&quot;</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;The article is not available online, but more =
>information about</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;the magazine may be found at</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;<A =
>HREF=3D"http://www.hudson.org/American_Outlook/" =
>TARGET=3D"_blank">http://www.hudson.org/American_Outlook/</A></FONT>
><BR><FONT =
>SIZE=3D2>&gt;___________________________________________________________=
>______</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;</FONT>
><BR><FONT =
>SIZE=3D2>&gt;___________________________________________________________=
>______</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>&gt;</FONT>
></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Norman A. Stahl</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Professor and Chair</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Literacy Education</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>GH 223</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>Northern Illinois University</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>DeKalb, IL 60115</FONT>
></P>
>
><P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Phone: (815) 753-9032</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>FAX:&nbsp;&nbsp; (815) 753-8563</FONT>
><BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>[log in to unmask]</FONT>
></P>
>
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>
"The illiterate of the year 2000 will not be the individual who cannot read
and write, but the one who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn."
                Alvin Toffler