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S. I. Hayakawa wrote about different ways of denoting things causing
differences in perception. The phrase "havens for the elite and the
academically qualified" certainly will raise the hackles of us sensitive
modern educationalists. Is the NBA a "haven for the elite and athletically
qualified"? Can we find a similar term to describe NASA, the Rand
Corporation? I don't see how it can be denied that any sort of highly-
qualified people in any field (let's omit "elite") need a "haven."

In nearly all these postings I notice a curious discontinuity. One side
proposes that high standards should be maintained, the other replies --
as though it were a counter argument -- that we mustn't deprive anyone
of the right to pursue a higher education.

I fail to see how keeping high standards in the pursuit of academic
degrees deprives anyone of the opportunity to a higher education. It
simply means that everyone who desires a college degree needs to meet a
high standard. Should it not be so?

I reiterate my concern that, given the observed fact that not everyone
does meet the necessary high standards, there is not a formalized
"something of value" for them. (I refer to high-status trade schools or
apprenticeships, a la the German system, for example). I see that as a
major weakness in our near-chaotic educational melange.

John M. Flanigan <[log in to unmask]>   The equation is the final arbiter.
Assistant Professor, Mathematics                    --Werner Heisenberg
http://naio.kcc.hawaii.edu/jflanigan  The scoreboard is the final arbiter.
Kapi'olani Community College                        --Bill Walton
4303 Diamond Head Road                History is the final arbiter.
Honolulu HI  96816                                  --Edward Gibbon
(808) 734-9371                        Nature is the final arbiter.
                                                    --Barry Commoner
On Tue, 15 Aug 2000, Cynthia Linton wrote:

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>
>         I am concerned that part of the efforts to "maintain quality"
> in higher education derive from an inability to accept change, both
> in the nature and content of education, and in the nature and content
> of our society. Do we seek to restore "quality" in higher education
> by decreasing access to any level of education that will make those
> able to attend more knowledgeable and better able to participate in
> society - with or without a degree? Do we want colleges and
> universities to revert to being "havens for the elite and the
> academically qualified?"
>
> Cynthia Linton
>
> x
>
> Cynthia A. LINTON
> Learning Center Director
> http://dcr.csusb.edu/LearningCenter/
> California State University, San Bernardino
> 5500 University Prkwy.
> San Bernardino, CA 92407-2397
> Telephone: (909) 880-5000, ext.3037 / Fax: (909) 880-7058
> E-mail address: [log in to unmask]
> --============_-1245762809==_ma============
> Content-Type: text/enriched; charset="us-ascii"
>
>         <fontfamily><param>Palatino</param><bigger><bigger>I am concerned that
> part of the efforts to "maintain quality" in higher education derive
> from an inability to accept change, both in the nature and content of
> education, and in the nature and content of our society. Do we seek to
> restore "quality" in higher education by decreasing access to any level
> of education that will make those able to attend more knowledgeable and
> better able to participate in society - with or without a degree? Do we
> want colleges and universities to revert to being "havens for the elite
> and the academically qualified?"
>
>
> Cynthia Linton
>
>
> x
> </bigger></bigger></fontfamily>
>
> Cynthia A. LINTON
>
> Learning Center Director
>
> http://dcr.csusb.edu/LearningCenter/
>
> California State University, San Bernardino
>
> 5500 University Prkwy.
>
> San Bernardino, CA 92407-2397
>
> Telephone: (909) 880-5000, ext.3037 / Fax: (909) 880-7058
>
> E-mail address: [log in to unmask]
>
> --============_-1245762809==_ma============--
>