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Information on personality type (MBTI) indicates that the majority of the
population (around 76%) are Sensing learners, that is, they learn through
careful, step-by-step repetitive practice and analysis; the other 24% of the
population are INtuitive learners and learn through "insight" or "inspiration."
Since few people are a "pure" type (totally S or N), most people benefit from a
variety of approaches.  However, if one is strongly INtuitive, then one has a
tendency to grasp concepts and theories very quickly and become
bored/disinterested with details.  If, on the other hand, one is strongly
Sensing, then one enjoys learning details (definitions, lists, characteristics,
etc) although s/he may fail to conceptualize the generalities/commonalities
among those specifics.  Whatever one's tendencies or natural preferences may be,
with strategic information and experience, one can master whatever tasks are
required by the academic discipline -- usually with satisfactory results.

Gail Platt

"Mayfield, Linda" wrote:

> Teaching future nurses, I am committed to both the transfer of training and
> the quantum leap, and intentionally integrate the potential for both into my
> teaching of success skills.  (Karen--they practice giving injections to
> medical manikins [not spelled the same as the store models]and each
> other--I'm not sure about the oranges ;-).) My students are required to do
> tasks that involve them in each of the skills I teach, in order to pass the
> class.  I also actively solicit anecdotal data from them about how what they
> learn leads to "aha" experiences.  I love it when I teach something and have
> a couple of them look at each other in amazement and say, "Cool!"  I have a
> format for students to use for reporting times they apply what they  learned
> in my class to other disciplines, for which I give extra credit points.
> After they finish the course, I also send frequent (sometimes weekly) upbeat
> email requests/reminders that I need qualitative data for validating the
> benefit of the course, and ask them to drop me a line via email whenever
> they find they've used something they learned, or it has contributed to a
> breakthrough in some area of their lives.  I do get responses, and I am
> gathering a file of qualitative data that can eventually also be quantified
> in supporting the value of the program.  Just today I saw a student I had
> two years ago, and she told me she has used the stress management strategies
> so much and so successfully that she has been teaching them to other
> students in her dorm.  I'll be in contact with her immediately by email to
> get that endorsement in my file!
>
> Linda Riggs Mayfield, MA
> Associate Faculty for Academic Enhancement
>
>        Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing
> Quincy, IL 62305-7005
> [log in to unmask]
>
> > ----------
> > From:         Karen Agee[SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
> > Reply To:     Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
> > Sent:         Monday, August 28, 2000 1:18 PM
> > To:   [log in to unmask]
> > Subject:      Re: value of academic success seminars
> >
> > Norm,
> >
> > I wonder if the "transfer of training" idea is really useful in physical
> > tasks (try hypodermic on orange; now try on human arm) and those
> > requiring rote practice (such as memorization of nonsense syllables) and
> > maybe a little less useful for other kinds of learning, especially at
> > the higher levels of thinking.
> >
> > In the case of higher learning, instead of a steady growth in
> > things-practiced-and-therefore-known, do you suppose there is instead
> > sometimes a quantum jump?  Suddenly, one sees!  Suddenly, one knows
> > something that changes one's other knowledge, as well.
> >
> > Of course, this is the kind of teaching I intend to do -- the inspired
> > and inspiring kind.
> >
> > The difficulty of assessing this learning later may be that -- unless
> > the Aha! is a particularly vivid experience -- we learners forget that
> > we did not always know.
> >
> > What do you think?
> >