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Julie,

We teach our Speed Reading courses in our Student Services Center
classroom, with 12 contact hours in the four weeks, either MWF or TTh.
The first two weeks we push on rate; the next week we work on
comprehension; and the last week we put it together in real textbooks.
We provide the materials (published timed readings, mostly from
Jamestown Publishers) until the last week, when we ask students to bring
their own textbooks.  It's not unusual for students to be reading their
text chapters two or three times faster by the end of the course, and we
do more official pre-, mid-, and post-tests, as well.  Yes, I know we
need to work on more than speed -- but it's a way to get into their
minds.

We have students who won't read their assignments if it's going to take
too much of their time.  (If your ethical system says that it's not fair
for instructors to assign so much reading, it is moral to decline to do
the reading, don't you think?)  If they know they CAN read a chapter in
45 minutes rather than 2 hours -- and understand it better because they
haven't daydreamed and suffered through it -- and now know what they
should do AFTER reading the chapter, then they're more likely to read
it, n'est-ce pas?

We don't offer Speed Reading, as such, in presentations (in academic
courses, residence halls, Greek houses).  It simply takes too many
contact hours to present it that way -- whether because students need to
practice for the training to transfer to their texts or because only
doing speed reading seems to lead to insights about how to do speed
reading, whatever your learning theory is about this.  A more practical
reason we don't offer Speed Reading elsewhere is that all those reading
materials and stop watches and answer sheets are difficult to transport!