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Linda,
My ideas may seem bizarre but my background is with probationary students in both high school and college levels.  You have to start where the student is.  I was approached by our coaches for some ideas to create involvement at "study tables."  This is a mandated study time for athletes.  They show up but with Sports Illustrated instead of Survey of Calculus.  I introduced textbook reading and notetaking skills by having them share what they were reading in Sports Illustrated.  We talked about Charles Barkley.  I made notes on the board, ie, What were the main points about CB?  What could they tell me about him after browsing the article?  How long did it take them to learn this info?  Did they read every word or skim for the main ideas?  I then translate this into textbooks, ie, "It's not as painful as you think."
I tell the instructors if I can get the students to read the table of contents BEFORE they come to class, I feel successful.  Because having just a tiny concept of what is being discussed in the lecture is motivating and students usually start doing more as a result.  The faculty agree.


Carolyn DeLorme, Director
University Learning Center
University of North Dakota
P.O. Box 9042
Grand Forks, ND  58202
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Office:  (701)777-4406
FAX:  (701)777-3397

>>> "Evans, Linda" <[log in to unmask]> 08/10/00 08:44AM >>>
Hi all,
I'm looking for inspiration.  We work with a large number of student
athletes here at USF.  The feedback we've gotten from athletic dept.
advisors is that our courses really make a difference in the athletes'
reading and study habits.  Now I've been asked to develop a series of three
workshops for the beginning of the semester to focus on notetaking skills,
time management and test prep. I'm looking for interactive activities that
will get the information across in a meaningful way and keep them involved
in doing rather than listening.  I've done workshops for them in the past
but always felt dissatisfied with what I perceived they got from the
experience. The student athletes can be a hard group to keep interested and
focused in an evening workshop, so appealing to their kinesthetic,
team-oriented, and competitive strengths is something I would like to do
more of this time around.  I would appreciate hearing of any of your
experiences and will gladly share what I finally develop.  Thanks, Linda

Linda S. Evans, Ph.D.
Director, Reading & Learning Program
SVC 2124
4202 E. Fowler Ave.
Tampa, FL 33620
phone: 813-974-9308
fax: 813-974-5089
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website: http://usfweb.usf.edu/reading