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The reading specialist should have a quiet place to work. S/he should be
encouraged to work one-on-one but should also be able to apply reading
strategies to small group sessions (three or four people). Most reading
strategies work best when applied to course content, so maybe the
specialist can also run study sessions/tutoring for a few classes on campus
that are required of many students and that require a lot of reading. I
don't think a computer is required, but it depends on your student
population. If you will have a large population of students with low-level
reading skills, computer software can help. We don't use any. A full-time
reading and study skills specialist on our campus would start off at the
low salary of about $21,000--off when the students are off. A part-timer is
about $12 an hour.

At 09:04 AM 10/16/2000 -0500, you wrote:
>My name is Dan Falk.  I am the Director of Student Development at Friends
>University in Wichita, Kansas.  I have a question about reading specialists.
>We currently do not have one.  However, the school is looking at bringing
>one in to work in my department.  I have several questions that I hope you
>all could help me with concerning this situation.
>
>First, why type of environment does a reading specialist need to do their
>work?  ( Quiet office space...)
>Secondly, do they usually need a great deal of software and a computer?
>How much do they make an hour on average?
>Do they work one on one, can they work in group settings/
>Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!
>
>Dan Falk
>Student Development
>Friends University
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