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Julie, at Onondaga Comm. College, we removed that stipulation once we set
up a centralized Content Tutoring Center.  It had become apparent that a
few faculty systematically refused to sign off on the application for their
students, apparently thinking that it somehow was a negative reflection on
their teaching ability.  We now do insist that each applicant sign an
agreement to attend classes regularly, come prepared to the tutoring
session, etc.  It seems to be working.  If we discover (usually from tutor)
that a tutee is NOT abiding by that agreement, that student is told he/she
will no longer be tutored for that course.
At 08:54 AM 10/10/00 -0400, you wrote:
>When I started my job as Tutor Coordinator at Frederick Community College,
I inherited a system where students who wanted 1:1 tutoring are required to
first get their instructor's written permission. The reasons given for this
were that:
>1. instructors could insure that students were first using department
resources such as office hours
>2. students could not use tutoring as a substitute for attending class
>3. staff could "distinguish those students who are truly in need of
tutorial services" as the tutoring budget was not bottomless
>
>I am taking this issue to our advisory board as I would like to remove
this stipulation for various reasons. I would welcome any feedback on the
pros/cons of asking for instructor's signatures. Do any other colleges
require this for 1:1 tutoring? We don't require signatures for drop-in or
online tutoring.
>
>Thanks for your input.
>
>
>
>Julie Shattuck
>Program Manager, Tutorial Services
>(301) 846 2523
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>