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If I remember correctly, John Chaffee has quite a bit of material covering this
topic in Thinking Critically.  One of the exercises provides 5 different
reporters' (from very diverse international publications) accounts of what
happened at Tieneman (sp?) Square.  Students are to try to weed out the
"facts."  Our current freshmen do not necessarily know much about this
incident, so it also helps educate them about the experiences of college
students in other parts of the world.

I used Chaffee's book as the text for one of the courses I developed at the
University of Georgia, and found that it had much to offer, though I
supplemented freely with other exercises, films, etc.  One film series I used
gave 2 historians' opposing accounts of the Vietnam War, using the same
photographs, but with different text.

Jeanne Higbee
University of Minnesota

KATHLEEN RIEHLE wrote:

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> Hi group,
>
> Along with our discussion of inferences, I would like to find some
> resources that discuss inference types. The Journal of Reading ( pp.
> 564-565, 1993) includes an article that reports on a effective strategy for
> teaching inferential comprehension but fails to explain the differing
> inference types. Any ideas?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Katy
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> <html>
> Hi group, <br>
> <br>
> Along with our discussion of inferences, I would like to find some
> resources that discuss inference types. <i>The Journal of Reading </i>(
> pp. 564-565, 1993) includes an article that reports on a effective
> strategy for teaching inferential comprehension but fails to explain the
> differing inference types. Any ideas?<br>
> <br>
> Thanks, <br>
> <br>
> Katy</html>
>
> --=====================_9106771==_.ALT--

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