Print

Print


The best thing I use to teach inference are political cartoons. Select a few
and have the students research the "topics" or thought in the article first,
and then explain what conclusions are being drawn.  This does two things-helps
out the history teacher and student by raising schema, and teaches inference at
the same time.
Helen Sabin
Chair, Educational Leadership
Connected University/Classroom Connect

KATHLEEN RIEHLE wrote:

> --=====================_9106771==_.ALT
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
>
> Hi group,
>
> Along with our discussion of inferences, I would like to find some
> resources that discuss inference types. The Journal of Reading ( pp.
> 564-565, 1993) includes an article that reports on a effective strategy for
> teaching inferential comprehension but fails to explain the differing
> inference types. Any ideas?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Katy
> --=====================_9106771==_.ALT
> Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
>
> <html>
> Hi group, <br>
> <br>
> Along with our discussion of inferences, I would like to find some
> resources that discuss inference types. <i>The Journal of Reading </i>(
> pp. 564-565, 1993) includes an article that reports on a effective
> strategy for teaching inferential comprehension but fails to explain the
> differing inference types. Any ideas?<br>
> <br>
> Thanks, <br>
> <br>
> Katy</html>
>
> --=====================_9106771==_.ALT--