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Here is an example of implication (in the title) and inference (your reaction) in
the picture.  Enjoy!  You could do an entire lesson on inference out of this
picture! Hope this works-
Helen Sabin


Helen Sabin wrote:

> The best thing I use to teach inference are political cartoons. Select a few
> and have the students research the "topics" or thought in the article first,
> and then explain what conclusions are being drawn.  This does two things-helps
> out the history teacher and student by raising schema, and teaches inference at
> the same time.
> Helen Sabin
> Chair, Educational Leadership
> Connected University/Classroom Connect
>
> KATHLEEN RIEHLE wrote:
>
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> >
> > Hi group,
> >
> > Along with our discussion of inferences, I would like to find some
> > resources that discuss inference types. The Journal of Reading ( pp.
> > 564-565, 1993) includes an article that reports on a effective strategy for
> > teaching inferential comprehension but fails to explain the differing
> > inference types. Any ideas?
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Katy
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> >
> > <html>
> > Hi group, <br>
> > <br>
> > Along with our discussion of inferences, I would like to find some
> > resources that discuss inference types. <i>The Journal of Reading </i>(
> > pp. 564-565, 1993) includes an article that reports on a effective
> > strategy for teaching inferential comprehension but fails to explain the
> > differing inference types. Any ideas?<br>
> > <br>
> > Thanks, <br>
> > <br>
> > Katy</html>
> >
> > --=====================_9106771==_.ALT--