Print

Print


I am English and I've been to Montreal many times.  Montreal is a wonderful
place to visit.  Don't worry about Canadian politics while you are there.
Language politics are for politicians, people just want to live and enjoy
life, and I can tell you from experience, les Quebecois know how to party
and enjoy life.  Americans that have not been to Quebec before will enjoy
the rich cultural experience that awaits you.  There are many things in
cities around the world, even in Las Vegas that have been distasteful to me.
However, I can walk down the street in my own city and run into things that
are distasteful, as everyone can.

One thing that you should never forget, Canadians both French and English
are America's best friends!

Bob Soutar
Manager, Records/Information Holdings
Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation
http://www.cdic.ca
mailto:[log in to unmask]




-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Pemberton [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, November 07, 2000 9:45 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Montreal


Yes John, but the overriding point is that English is the language of
business in more countries than any other -- that's either by count of
countries or GDP.


At 08:49 PM 11/7/00 -0700, John Montana wrote:
>It is customary in the United States to assume that everyone in the world
>speaks
>English, everyone takes Yankee dollars, everybody has a McDonald's (don't
>want to
>be eating that dreadful foreign food, you know), everybody uses 60 cycle
>110 volt
>electricity, and everybody in the whole wide world has a solemn obligation
>to give
>a damn what Americans think.
>
>None of these things is true, of course, but it is often a source of
>amusement to
>see some elderly couple getting a bit huffy when one or more of these
>assumptions
>doesn't turn out to be true, and those doggone Mexicans actually have the
>nerve to
>speak Spanish in their own country.
>
>If the Quebecois demand that everything be in French, it's okay -- they
speak
>French there.  We -- ARMA, the attendees, the Union -- will survive.  Not
only
>that, it'll teach us a lesson.  For years, we have been doing exactly the
same
>thing to others.  How do you suppose all those Japanese and Italians and
>Icelanders and others -- including Quebecois -- in ARMA have been getting
>along
>all these years?  There has been an assumption all along that they either
>speak
>English or will learn it, and if they don't, well that's just tough.  I'll
bet
>most of you haven't spent too much time worrying about them, have you?
>
>Well, the times they have a'changed.  If information managment and ARMA
>are to be
>truly international, those of us who are English speakers are going to
>have to get
>used to the fact that the rest of the world doesn't speak English and they
>have no
>obligation to defer to us -- in their part of the world, they get to make
the
>rules, and it's up to us to get up to speed.  There isn't some universal
law
>someplace that says that they have to accept English as a kind of 'Lingua
>Franca.'
>
>I personally relish this.  I'm looking forward very diligently to that
first
>conference in Tokyo, and when it happens, I hope they have lots of sessions
in
>Japanese, and lots of Japanese guys running around doing everything else,
in
>Japanese.  I'll buy a dictionary, attend every session, and hopefully, my
>pre-conference preparation will allow me to have at least an inkling of
what's
>happening.  If not, well, I'll just have to study harder.  Better yet,
>I'll get
>Kobayashi Fumi - San to take me out to a bar on the Ginza and give me
>lessons in
>Japanese.  Life's tough.
>
>So:
>
>Next time you're sitting on an airliner with time to kill, get out the
airline
>magazine, pick up that airphone and order some of those Berlitz tapes.
Study
>French, or Brazilian Portuguese, or Mandarin Chinese, or perhaps
>Mongolian. Ya'
>never know where that next conference might be. And:
>
>Next time you're at a conference, make the acquaintance of one of our
>non-North
>American members -- you may need them when the conference is in Italy, or
>Mongolia, and you'll discover that language lessons in the bar aren't all
that
>bad.  Those foreigners also pretty nice folks, to boot. And:
>
>Enjoy the fact that the world is the way it is -- do you really want the
whole
>world to look like that strip mall down the street?
>
>Regards to all,
>
>John Montana
>Montana & Associates
>29 Parsons Road
>Landenberg PA 19350
>610-255-1588



Tom Pemberton
Records Associates
39 West Julian Street
Suite 347
San Jose, CA  95110

Tel:    408 293-2623
Fax:    408 904-5760

www.recordsassociates.com


*******************Internet Email Confidentiality Footer*******************

Privileged/Confidential Information may be contained in this message. If you
are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for
delivery of
the message to such person), you may not copy or deliver this message to
anyone.
In such case, you should destroy this message and kindly notify the sender
by
reply email. Please advise immediately if you or your employer do not
consent to
Internet email for messages of this kind. Opinions, conclusions and other
information in this message that do not relate to the official business of
my
firm shall be understood as neither given nor endorsed by it.