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I'm interested in this discussion, as an ESL position has become an issue here
since the instructor left last year. My first thought was, "Wow, what a
coincidence." But then Norman's email made me realize maybe it isn't such a
coincidence that what's an issue here is elsewhere:

"Given the demographic changes of the past 20 years and certainly ahead for
the next few decades, I can not understand how any reading specialist
program would not have strong course work (freestanding or infused) that
does not deal with both L1 and L2 issues of literacy."

Norman: I don't have any specialization in this area, which means I don't know
what LEP is, nor do I know L1 or L2, and could you get me up to speed on what
"other models" are out there?

Much appreciated,

Steve Runge

Norman Stahl wrote:

> The IRA Professional Standards document currently has a number of
> competencies that might be expected to be covered in the training for an
> ESL or a Bilingual Education teacher.  There are states that now require
> all reading specialists to have a course that deals with LEP students.
> Given the demographic changes of the past 20 years and certainly ahead for
> the next few decades, I can not understand how any reading specialist
> program would not have strong course work (freestanding or infused) that
> does not deal with both L1 and L2 issues of literacy.  Please note that
> I've not simply advocated ESL approaches as there are a number of models
> out there. (Toto, I don't think we are in Kansas anymore.)
>
> Norman A. Stahl
> Professor and Chair
> Literacy Education
> GH 223
> Northern Illinois University
> DeKalb, IL 60115
>
> Phone: (815) 753-9032
> FAX:   (815) 753-8563
> [log in to unmask]
>
> ******************************************************
> Universities are institutions run by amateurs to train professionals.
> Derek Bok----Harvard University
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