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Although I am certainly in sympathy with the point of view expressed below about how poorly we pay tutors, many students who choose to accept the pay don't see it as abusive.  They have a variety of reasons for wanting the experience:  1) plans to teach in the public schools, 2) a desire to stay fresh with introductory course work in order to do well in GRE subject tests or the MCAT, 3) a belief that tutoring and study group facilitation will be attractive to potential employers and to grad schools wanting good teaching assistants.

Although students have a right to be paid better, they also recognize that some benefits aren't monetary.  (And in addition, on-campus work correlates with better grades and greater persistence toward graduation!)

Rosemary Bienz
>>> [log in to unmask] 12/01/00 07:59AM >>>
Once again, I must say that our problems in this area are increased by the fact that we pay tutors ( who should by definition be highly skilled workers) wages that are insulting and cause them economic hardships. How can we ask people to work for below market wages and require them to sign a contract saying they will stay with us? This is a capitalistic society based upon monetary rewards for labor, and we should not expect tutors to work for us for less than they can make elsewhere simply out of loyalty or contractual obligation when they can be paid better for the same level of work in the private sector.