Print

Print


Most of the time, image degradations on photographic film can be removed by simply rewashing the image.  A gentle bath in warm filtered water will remove water spots or embedded debris most of the time.  "Warm" can be described as 90 to 100 degrees F.  DO NOT take the water temperature over 105 F as you can literally melt the emulsion right off the film.  Remember, it's only gelatin.  A neg is extremely delicate when wet and scratching it while wet will remove the emulsion and there is no way to restore it.  A bath of 3 to 5 minutes should be sufficient.  Keep the image suspended, don't let it sit on the bottom of a tub or sink.

You can take a hair dryer to the image after it is washed in an attempt to get it to dry without spotting.  Again, keep the temperature of the dryer at a warm setting.  You can rub the image with your hand while you are giving it a bath to help remove stubborn particles, just be careful not to scrape your nail across the image and be sure your hands are clean before you begin.  Hold the image by an edge while drying and do not allow anything to come in contact with it while it is still wet. 
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Cheri Susner, CRM/NS 
  To: [log in to unmask] 
  Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2001 4:01 PM
  Subject: Radiograph Damage


  Question for the site -- When radiographs (x-rays) get wet and you need to
  try to restore them - does anyone have a process?  I have found that you can
  submerge them in warm water, but for how long?  What temperature is
  considered warm?

  Any information would be helpful.

  Cheri Susner, CRM/NS

  List archives at http://lists.ufl.edu/archives/recmgmt-l.html
  Contact [log in to unmask] for assistance

List archives at http://lists.ufl.edu/archives/recmgmt-l.html
Contact [log in to unmask] for assistance