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Your email stat's, are they what you expected since your wrote the email?

Averages
Sentences per Paragraph            2.8
Words per Sentence                  5.6
Characters per Word                 5.8

Readability
Passive Sentences                        0%
Flesch Reading Ease                  25.7
Flesch-Kincad Grade Level       11.0



Nic Voge wrote:

> Recently the issue of measuring readability levels of texts came up.
> As I recall, the overriding advice was to use the readability
> features in word processing programs. At one level this seems
> reasonable as these readability formulae are pretty standard. And
> this is certainly a convenient method of determining readability.
>
> However, I have questions about the premises these formulae are based
> upon. Do the core elements of these formula (e.g. word length and
> sentence length) really capture readability level? For instance, we
> know that using prior knowledge and making inferences are essential
> to reading. All texts require inference making but some more than
> others, and this is often what makes them difficult. But traditional
> readability measures do not address this issue at all (Probably
> because they were created largely before the cognitive revolution hit
> reading theory/research). Similarly, a text that requires esoteric
> prior knowledge but is written in short sentences may have a low
> readability  but be virtually unintelligible to readers. Here's an
> example:
> (1) Hippocrates recommended milk to his patients as a curative beverage.
> (2) One of the most famous Greek doctors told his patients to drink
> milk to cure illness.
>
> According to (Dougherty, (1985) "Composing Choices for Writers",
> p.281)the readability score for sentence 1 would be lower than for
> sentence 2 for some readability formulae. But that seems patently
> ridiculous. One must have very specific knowledge to make sense of
> the first sentence, namely who Hippocrates was. This particular
> example aside, the issues of prior knowledge and inferring seem
> important but unaddressed by readability measures, or at least the
> ones I am familiar with.
>
> So, my second question is: Does anyone know of other methods of
> determining readability?
>
> Thanks,
> Nic
> --
>
> Dominic J. Voge
> UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education
> Language, Literacy and Culture
> [log in to unmask]
>
> "I have spent a lifetime learning to read." --Goethe
> "The best educated human being is the one who understands most about
> the life in which he is placed."--Helen Keller