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Recent versions of UCINET (last 6 months I think) include a procedure to
calculate edge betweenness. steve.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Newman" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2002 12:48 AM
Subject: Re: link centrality (by analogy with other centrality metrics)


> Dear Ed,
>
> Yes, you can calculate precisely the thing you describe, and it does
> indeed work very well as a way of finding clusters in many networks.
> The only catch is that you need to recompute betweennesses for edges
> after each one is removed, otherwise the algorithm has some nasty
> pathologies and often produces garbage.  The technique is described
> in detail in a paper by Michelle Girvan and myself, which has not
> appeared in print yet, but you can find it online here:
>
>   http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0112110
>
> (I guess you missed Michelle's talk about this work in New Orleans -
> see what you miss if you leave before the end.)
>
> Best wishes,
> Mark.
>
> --
> Prof. M. E. J. Newman
> Santa Fe Institute
> Santa Fe, New Mexico
>
>
>
> Ed Vielmetti wrote:
> >
> > I'm experimenting with locating clusters in a network and
> > analyzing a structure for fragility by removing links between
> > pairs of nodes that each have high betweenness.  The algorithm
> > is pretty easy; look at the list of nodes ranked by betweenness,
> > determine if the top two nodes have a link, if so snip it; if
> > not, search iteratively through the list for the pair of links
> > with the highest combination.
> >
> > Is there any standard metric that computes link centrality
> > directly?  (A reference would be good.)  Intuitively it would
> > seem to be the "path that's in the most geodesics in the
> > network", and so it should be just about as hard to compute as
> > node centrality.  Google on "link centrality" turns up nothing.
> >
> > The motivation for thinking of links as items in their own right
> > is simply that from telecommunications networks, where the
> > circuit between two devices is the source of at least as much
> > cause for analysis as the endpoints.
>