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Doug,

My only thought is that the stability of the social networks -- instrumental
and affective -- in organizations may work against weekly monitoring.  I've
always been surprised by how little the networks change over time.  Indeed,
a challenge in doing longitudinal work is that even six months may not be
enough to see the sort of variance we need in our analyses.

Scott

_______________________
Scott L. Engle, Ph.D.
Engle Associates

5201 Southern Hills Dr.
Frisco, TX  75034
ph: 469-384-9440
fax: 360-242-2794
e-mail:  [log in to unmask]
website:  www.engleassociates.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Doug and Beth Bryan" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 11:10 AM
Subject: social nets and organizational theory


> Hi,
>
> I'm new to the list.  I sent out a request last week regarding social nets
> and organizational theory.  Thanks much to Sam, Kathleen, and others for
> their responses.  However, please allow me to elaborate...
>
> I'm looking for SNA work that is based on organizational theory
predictions
> of how the surrounding organization "should" behave.  For example, OT says
> that manufacturing firms should have taller hierarchies while
> knowledge-intensive firms should have wider hierarchies.  I'd like to take
> it to the point where OT can predict how much (relatively) marketing, R&D,
> and production departments should be communicating with each other, the
> direction of the info flow between departments, etc.
>
> Does anyone know of such work?
>
> My 1/2-baked idea is toward an enterprise resource planning tool that
> monitors social nets (of individuals, teams, and departments), week by
week
> in a way that is actionable by management.
>
> thanks,
> Doug Bryan
> [log in to unmask]
> http://pavg.stanford.edu/people/bryan