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Folks,
In light of the discussion on ROI I think the answer lies in the realm of risk
management.  Why does a company have liability insurance?  Business continuity
planning and insurance?  Health care plans?  Attorneys on staff or on retainer?  In
part all of these components and others are there to manage and reduce risk.  While
reducing risk is only part of the function of a records management program, it is a
significant component.  Why do attorneys have CEB?  Why do risk management staff
attend seminars on new safety and clean-up techniques?  Why do accountants attend
meetings to learn of new or changed accounting practices?  None of these functions
contribute directly to "sales" that put money in the corporate pocket.  They do
however insure corporate knowledge of current regulatory requirements and best
business practices.  For continuing education the records management professional
has major opportunities for continuing education through national conferences such
as ARMA and MER.  While such continuing education may not add one dollar of cash
directly to the corporate coffers it may save millions in avoidance of unnecessary
risk.  Dick KIng, University of Arizona

Richard Cox wrote:

> Now we are at the heart of one of the fundamental problems with ARMA and
> the records management community, the overwhelming connection between
> RM/ARMA and for-profit business.  Dave Gaynon writes, "I must say that I
> am amazed that no one has spoken of money and return on investment."  He
> continues: "Many years ago when I asked for corporate support to attend my
> first ARMA Conference.  My boss put the issue quite simply.  You need only
> indicate how your attendance will put more money in the business owners
> pockets."

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