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I seem to keep forgetting to respond to the whole list.

>Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 16:05:55 -0700
>To: Doug and Beth Bryan <[log in to unmask]>
>From: Patricia Sachs <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Re: Social Network Research Partners
>Cc:
>Bcc:
>X-Attachments:
>
>I work a lot with technology developers, and my sense is that they
>are not in a good position to comment on the unintended consequences
>of their innovations. This is a question that can be looked at in
>many grain sizes. I would suspect that consultants working in this
>area may have more insight about consequences than developers
>themselves.  Of course, it depends on the developers, the R&D and
>Innovation environments in which they're working, and what actually
>constitutes "consequences."
>
>Patricia Sachs
>
>
>>A few observations and a request.
>>
>>Technology development and policy (public or corporate) are quite separable.
>>Chasing both at the same time often serves neither well.  Technology
>>developers can help policy makers by being very clear about the consequences
>>of their innovations, so policy makers can avoid unintended consequences.
>>In the early stages of development I find it better to talk of consequences
>>rather than risks because risk implies harm and "harm" is a judgment call
>>(e.g., chemotherapy harms cells in a good way).  In later stages of
>>development technologists can also provide input on issues affecting
>>diffusion or adoption of their innovations.
>>
>>For SNA the discussion can quickly degrade into a privacy debate.  My
>>experience in international consulting is that views on "privacy" vary
>>greatly from country to country, and that most of the world doesn't share
>>the U.S. view.  Privacy is constantly traded for goods and services.  For
>>example, an appendectomy is invasive and personal, but most patients don't
>>consider it an invasion of their privacy.   (Sidebar: For an interesting
>>discussion of the use of information transparency in policy making, see
>>"Regulation by shame, Mary Graham, The Atlantic Monthly,  April 2000.
>>http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/2000/04/graham.htm )
>>
>>Here's a request.
>>What are common, unintended consequences of SNA?
>>What are the barriers to widespread adoption in corporate settings?
>>
>>Doug Bryan
>>[log in to unmask]
>>  http://pavg.stanford.edu/people/bryan
>>
>>
>>----- Original Message -----
>>From: "Sam Friedman" <[log in to unmask]>
>>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>Sent: Thursday, August 15, 2002 7:58 AM
>>Subject: Re: Social Network Research Partners
>>
>>
>>>  I for one have ethical qualms about working for an organization whose
>>  > stated aim is to kill people
>
>
>--
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>SOCIAL SOLUTIONS
>Work Systems Innovation & Design
>Patricia Sachs, PhD
>Founder/CEO
>427 Casa del Mar Drive, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
>
>http://www.social-solutions.com
>[log in to unmask]
>650.712.0555
>650.712.1557  fax
>650.255.2057 cell


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SOCIAL SOLUTIONS
Work Systems Innovation & Design
Patricia Sachs, PhD
Founder/CEO
427 Casa del Mar Drive, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019

http://www.social-solutions.com
[log in to unmask]
650.712.0555
650.712.1557  fax
650.255.2057 cell