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I don't think the prejudice regards so much what or how we teach as
who we teach. The prejudice against our students -- perceived as not
mainstream or traditional, as not prepared for college-level studies,
as not worthy of full investment, etc. -- inevitably rubs off on
those who are associated with them -- including those who teach them.

So long as the college or university is essentially elitist,
anti-democratic, and supportive of traditional privilege, the stigma
attached to the lesser prepared students and those who teach them
will remain in place, regardless of the label or packaging.

There's been a lot of discussion, even legislation, related to
dollars spent per student in state primary and secondary public
school systems.  I am trying to gather some data from my university
related to dollars spent per student in the honors program versus
dollars spent per student in remedial, developmental, whatever
courses, AND data that also compares family incomes of these two
groups. My hypothesis of course is that the university is devoting
many, many, many more dollars to the education of higher income
persons than to lower income persons -- just as the country does in
most primary and secondary systems.

So long as higher education is organized and designed to most benefit
higher income persons rather than to benefit all equally . . . .

Paul Ellis
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Paul Ellis, Director
Learning Assistance Program - BP 230
Northern Kentucky University
Nunn Drive
Highland Heights, KY 41099

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TEL 859.572.5611
FAX 859.572.5174

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