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Hi Listers,

     It has been a while since I sent out my featured articles message
so I thought it might be appropriate to start the new 2002 Fall semester
with the latest listing of featured articles #11. For a complete
description and links to these articles click on:

http://home.capecod.net/~tpanitz/features.htm

      You will find featured articles 1-10 archived at this site also
for any gluttonous readers out there.

      If you have a favorite article on student centered learning please
send it along to the list or to my attention. Thanks in advance.

Regards,
Ted

Featured articles #11

CHANGING A COURSE FROM LECTURE FORMAT TO COOPERATIVE LEARNING
 Dean A. McManus, Professor School of Oceanography

Updated from an article which originally appeared in the Winter 1996
issue of Paideia: Undergraduate Education at the University of
Washington. 4(1), 12-16

For almost thirty years I have taught a senior course in marine geology.
Although I have
 revised it over the years, it has always been a lecture course. Fall
Quarter 1994, I
 substantially changed my approach: I gave only three lectures and three
demonstrations the
 entire quarter. Students learned primarily through cooperative
assignments and individual
 projects.

COOPERATIVE/COLLABORATIVE STRUCTURES EXPLICITLY DESIGNED TO PROMOTE
POSITIVE INTERDEPENDENCE AMONG GROUP MEMBERS by  Joe Cuseo

 Positive interdependence is the quintessential quality that defines
collaboration and transforms group work into teamwork. It is a key
feature that has been emphasized by scholars concerned primarily with
promoting students' academic achievement and cognitive development
(Slavin, 1983; Johnson & Johnson, 1987), as well as scholars concerned
with students' holistic development, such as Chickering (1969)-who
argues that, in its highest form, the development of autonomy does not
simply involve the development of freedom to choose freely and act
independent of outside influences, but also involves the development of
freedom that recognizes  one's dependence and obligations to others. The
following are some single-step strategies that may be used to promote
positive interdependence among students working in groups.

TIPS FOR GRADING GROUP WORK  By  Kathleen McKinney

RESEARCH FOR THE FUTURE: RESEARCH ON COOPERATIVE LEARNING AND
ACHIEVEMENT: WHAT WE KNOW, WHAT WE NEED TO KNOW.
Slavin, R.E.   Contemporary Educational  Psychology, 1996, 21 (1),
43-69.

This paper is adapted from Slavin, 1992. It was written under a grant
from the Office of
     Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education
(No.
     OERI-R-117-D40005). However, any opinions expressed are mine and do
not necessarily
     represent OERI positions or policies.

Research on cooperative learning is one of the greatest success stories
in the history of
educational research. While there was some research on this topic from
the early days of this
century, the amount and quality of that research greatly accelerated in
the early 1970's, and
continues unabated today, a quarter-century later. Hundreds of studies
have compared
cooperative learning to various control methods on a broad range of
measures, but by far the most frequent objective of this research is to
determine the effects of cooperative learning on student achievement.

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