Re: Learning Centre Assessment tools
Almost all of our asssessment tools are in-house, largely for budgetary reasons.  We have developed our own writing sample assessment and our own grammar/mechanics assessement.  We have a post-test checklist students can use, and a quick self assessment our our web page for students to use to see which study skills might need brushing up. We ocassionally use the LSI (Learning Styles Inventory) if the student is interested enough to pay for it, and students really like the practical information that connects the profile to careers and study strategies.  If we are working with students who need to develop basic reading/writing/math skills, we post test the student with the same standardized test as the one that placed them on our support list, usually Accuplacer or the Canadian Achievement test.
 

Usually, however, our assessment is done by interviewing students with learning difficulties as to what they percieve to be their problem, checking out current study strategies, asking questions that would indicate learning style, and going from there, using the interviewer's teaching and interviewing skills to get at what may be missing.

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There are 10 messages totalling 606 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. StudentAffairs.com Online Courses
  2. Assessment Materials (3)
  3. National Tutoring Week
  4. Online students (3)
  5. More ? about Online students
  6. Graduation Pledge of Social and Environmental Responsibility

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Date:    Tue, 17 Sep 2002 17:56:44 -0700
From:    S B <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: StudentAffairs.com Online Courses

The registration deadline for the Fall 2002
StudentAffairs.com online workshops for student
affairs administrators
(http://www.studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/) is fast
approaching.

For specific information about taking in an online
course, peruse our new Frequently Asked Questions
(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/faq.html)
section.

The eight courses being offered this fall are:

WEB BASED STUDENT SERVICES FOR THE NON-TECHNICAL
STUDENT AFFAIRS PROFESSIONAL
This three-week workshop is designed to provide the
non-technical student affairs professional with a
basis to begin asking the right questions about web
based student services. It is not a how to workshop.
We will not go over the design or construction aspects
of building such a web site. At the end of this
workshop you will NOT be prepared to launch web based
services for your students. You WILL be prepared to
beginning asking relevant questions and to begin the
process of planning for the organizational changes
that will likely occur because of the implementation
of web based services.
(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course1.html)

GIVING VOICE TO CRITICAL CAMPUS ISSUES
This course is based on the book, Giving voice to
critical campus issues: Qualitative research in
student affairs, published in 1999 through ACPA Media.
The book is a collection of qualitative research case
studies covering the following topics: Alcohol related
death of a residence hall student, Student suicide,
Acquaintance rape, Adult child of an alcoholic,
Tri-racial identity, and Class issues in the academy.
The course presents an opportunity to read the book,
gain an understanding of college life, and further
expand knowledge of student affairs practice through
course discussion and interaction.
(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course2.html)

THE ROAD TO SUCCESS: A COURSE FOR ENTRY-LEVEL HALL
DIRECTORS
Designed for entry-level Hall Directors, this
three-week course will take participants on a "road
trip" through new concepts, creative strategies and
proven techniques to help them succeed as a Housing
Professional. Participants' journey will begin with
Developing a Staff Team. Next we'll explore Dealing
with Disciplinary Issues. The road trip will come to
an end as we make a final stop at Facilities
Management and The Customer Service Connection. A
variety of instructional methods will be sure to keep
participants on course and running smoothly throughout
this educational experience. This course is presented
in conjunction with the Web site Reslife.Net.
(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course3.html)

CAMPUS MEDIATION AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS
This course will present a comprehensive look at ways
to integrate mediation and conflict management
processes into the campus community, including uses
for managing student behavior and supporting judicial
systems. The course does not presuppose prior
mediation knowledge or training.
(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course4.html)

CRITICAL LAW AND POLICY ISSUES FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
ADMINISTRATORS
This is the first in a sequence of courses designed to
give participants an in-depth view of critical law and
policy issues in higher education. The first course (
"The student-university-parent relationship") reviews
the evolution and direction of the concept of in loco
parentis, considers alternative formulations, and
concludes with analysis of the growing role of parents
in campus governance.
(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course5.html)

SUPERVISION PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS
This three week short course is geared to entry-level
and mid-level staff and will provide participants with
the opportunity to focus on core supervisory skills
such as 1) supervisory communication and successful
meetings, 2) goal-setting and expectations, 3)
generational supervision issues, 4) working with
special populations, 5) performance appraisals and 6)
staff motivation. Through readings, participation on a
discussion board, and case studies, participants will
explore basic tenets crucial for successful
supervision of both student and professional staff.
This course is presented in conjunction with the Web
site Reslife.Net.

(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course6.html)

DEMYSTIFYING ACADMIC AFFAIRS
This three week professional development course will
introduce academic affairs in simple, straightforward
terms to student affairs professionals. The course
will provide a broad overview of academic affairs for
those: 1) seeking to learn more about the organization
and workings of academic affairs, 2)seeking to
cultivate collaborative ventures with academic
affairs, and 3)desiring a better understanding for the
purposes of future career paths.

(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course7.html)

WHAT "ACADEMIC FREEDOM" MEANS: A PRIMER FOR ACADEMIC
AND STUDENT DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATORS
This is the second in a sequence of courses designed
to give participants an in-depth view of critical law
and policy issues in higher education. The first
course focused on the student-university-parent
relationship. This course examines the origins and
nature of constitutionally protected academic freedom.
Special attention will be paid to classroom
management, student claims to academic freedom, the
authority to award and change grades, the professional
responsibilities of professors, academic freedom and
"reasonable accommodation" under federal disabilities
law, and the tension between academic freedom and
institutional sexual harassment policies.

(http://studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/fall2002course8.html)

The StudentAffairs.com online course experiencewill
afford participants, from all parts of the country, at
all size institutions, and at all functional levels,
an energizing and innovative experience.  To learn
more about this exciting professional development
opportunity, and how to register online, go to:
 http://www.studentaffairs.com/onlinecourses/

Stuart Brown, President
StudentAffairs.com

__________________________________________________
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Yahoo! News - Today's headlines
http://news.yahoo.com

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 17 Sep 2002 21:37:28 -0400
From:    Shana Vinegar <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Assessment Materials

Dear Colleagues,

I am a doctoral student doing research on the strengths and weaknesses of
the various assessment instruments used in learning resource centers, I
was hoping you could share with me some of the instruments you use on your
campuses and something about their strengths and weaknesses (learning
styles, emotional intelligence, college readiness, reading comprehension,
critical thinking skills, etc.).

I really really need your help, my research (and literature review) can
not go any further without it.

Thanking you in advance for all of your help,

Shana

______________________________
Shana E. Vinegar, MIS, MADR
"Working with underprepared students - no matter what their age"
P.O. Box 250673
West Bloomfield, MI 48325

Telephone: 248.884.2289
Fax: 248.960.7179
e-mail: [log in to unmask]

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 17 Sep 2002 21:34:35 -0700
From:    Marcia Krull <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: National Tutoring Week

This is the first year that I have heard about National Tutoring Week,
and we have been planning several activities.  We were able to get some
funding through our college Foundation to purchase "National Tutoring
Week" polo shirts for all of our tutors.  In addition, we will be
renting a helium tank and blowing up balloons to decorate the Learning
Centers at both campuses.  Our dean is providing a cake for each of the
campus Learning Centers as well, and we plan to have snacks available
each day so that everyone visiting the Centers can share in the
celebration.  We are also having blank "Thank You" cards printed up so
that tutees may express their appreciation.  We hope to keep the
celebration going throughout the week since some of our tutors work
limited days/hours, and we want to make sure that everyone is recognized
for the outstanding work that they do.

Marcia Krull
Mt. San Jacinto College
San Jacinto, CA 92583
[log in to unmask]

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Sandy Mastandrea
Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2002 5:05 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: National Tutoring Week

National Tutoring Week is the week of October 7-11, I am curious as to
what
other learning centers do to celebrate/recognize their tutors and the
work
they do. I look forward to your ideas.

Sandy Mastandrea

Miami University, Ohio

Sandra L. Mastandrea
Administrator of Tutorial Services
Bernard B. Rinella, Jr. Learning Assistance Center
301 S. Campus Avenue Room 23
Oxford, Ohio 45056-2481
513-529-8741

To Unsubscribe,
send a message to [log in to unmask]
In body type: SIGNOFF LRNASST.

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 18 Sep 2002 02:14:27 EDT
From:    Lucy Macdonald <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Online students

Liz,

Success as retention depends in a great part on building a cohort of
learners.  It is this community of learners that holds each others hands and
creates retention.  However, if you are talking about what requirements
students need, I find that "self regulation" is really important. Other
skills needed might be knowing how to use a word processor for a writing
class, for instance.

There's a start.

Lucy MacDonald
http://www.lucyonline.com

In a message dated 9/17/02 10:49:53 PM, [log in to unmask] writes:

>Hello all,
>
>I am looking for information about what makes students successful in on
>line
>classes.  There's tons of stuff about designing classes, pedagogy,
>infrastructure, etc. etc.etc., but not much from the student end.
>
>Of course such students need to have a certain level of computer skills;
>be
>able to read and write reasonable well; manage time; and have the
>self-discipline to meet deadlines.  But what's out there that says this
>formally?
>
>I am exploring other avenues and am aware of sites such as Lucy MacDonald's
>
>Thanks for any leads, on list or privately.
>
>Liz
>--
>Elizabeth B. Dewey
>Student Development Specialist
>Teaching/Learning Center, Delta College
>University Center, MI  48710
>Phone (989) 686-9587
>"A university is, according to the usual designation, an alma mater, knowing
>her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill."-John
>Henry Newman

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 18 Sep 2002 02:20:57 EDT
From:    Lucy Macdonald <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Online students

Pat,

You are right about orientation. Since I teach study skills online and this
is frequently the first online course that students take, I think I should
get EXTRA pay for providing orientation to online learning for ALL the other
classes!

However, I DO provide THREE alternatives for orientation.

1. Online orientation - Yes students receive a quiz on this!!

2. VIDEO (cassette) orientation - check out from the library or have sent to
you.

3. Hands on orientation held at the end of the first week on a Saturday.  I
make this long enough to do the orientation AND all the first week's work to
get students in line with the rest of the class to begin week two.  Yes,
students have to come to campus for this.  Some students have chosen this
option and driven 4 hours one way.

Lucy MacDonald
In a message dated 9/17/02 11:07:27 PM, [log in to unmask] writes:

>i Liz-
>One of the biggest needs I see for students who are taking online courses
>is
>ORIENTATION!  This form of study is very different than sitting in a
>classroom with a professor.  How to become an active member in an online
>course is something many of these students take several weeks to figure
>out.
>By the time they've figured out how to be a successful online student,
>they
>have lost time and possibly received a lower grade for the first two weeks!
>Just my thought-
>Pat McCurdy
>Cayuga Community College

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 18 Sep 2002 02:39:57 EDT
From:    Lucy Macdonald <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: More ? about Online students

Liz,

One of the issues for my online students is the study environment, ie
studying with children, using the computer at work or at a public library.
The second issue is the difficulty of 24/7 i.e., if I can go to school
anytime, when is that? Students need to set up a schedule to "attend" class
online and do the necessary work offline.

Other issues are the myths of online classes.

1. It's easier to do than an online class.

My students tell me that online classes are more intense, because you have to
participate everytime. There is no sleeping in the back of the class and
there are no snow days!

2. You can do it anytime you want.

I don't let my students do everything the last week of class.  I work on a
weekly schedule and archive the previous week's work. Students can see it by
not participate.

3. It's self paced learning.

My classes are built in cooperative groups. Therefore, we need to work
together.

4. You just read the web pages and take the tests.

I require online discussions, where the teaching and learning take place. It
is the critical thinking process that I am most interested in and this
happens in the discussion area.

Lucy MacDonald

In a message dated 9/18/02 3:36:35 AM, [log in to unmask] writes:

>I'm going to rephrase my original request a bit.  Let's try this:
>
>What are the problems or inadequate skills  that cause students to be
unsuccessful,
>to fail in online courses?  Are there factors outside the realm of
"traditional"
>study skills such as time management, reading level, etc. that subvert
>effective
>learning in the online environment?
>
>Thanks for responses.
>
>Liz

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 17 Sep 2002 23:53:29 -0500
From:    Neil Wollman <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Graduation Pledge of Social and Environmental Responsibility

Here is a project that can be utilized in different ways in service
learning or community service learning contexts, as well as in classes.

=======================================================================================

Neil Wollman, Senior Fellow, Peace Studies Institute; Professor of
Psychology; Manchester College, N. Manchester, IN 46962; 260-982-5346; fax
260-982-5043; [log in to unmask]
=======================================================================================

                                    GRADUATION PLEDGE ALLIANCE

Humboldt State University (California) initiated the  Graduation Pledge of
Social and Environmental Responsibility. It states, "I pledge to explore
and take into account the social and environmental consequences of any job
I consider and will try to improve these aspects of any organizations for
which I work."  Students define what being "responsible" means to
themselves. Students at over a hundred colleges and universities have used
the pledge  at some level, at schools which range in size from Whitman, to
Harvard, to University of Wisconsin. This now includes some schools
overseas, graduate and professional schools, and high schools. Graduates
who voluntarily signed the pledge have turned down jobs they did not feel
morally comfortable with and have worked to make changes once on the job.
For example, they have promoted recycling at their organization, removed
racist language from a training manual, worked for gender parity in high
school athletics, and helped to convince an employer to refuse a chemical
weapons-related contract.

Manchester College now coordinates the campaign effort, which has taken
different forms at different institutions. At Manchester, it is a
community-wide event involving students, faculty, and staff. Typically,
fifty percent of students sign and keep a wallet-size card stating the
pledge, while students and supportive faculty wear green ribbons at
commencement and the pledge is printed in the formal commencement program.
Depending upon the school, it might take several years to reach this level
of institutionalization.  If one can just get a few groups/departments
involved, and get some media attention on (and off) campus, it will get
others interested and build for the future. The project has been covered in
newspapers around the country(e.g., USA Today,Chicago Tribune, Washington
Post, and Boston Globe), as well as being covered in magazines, national
radio networks, and local T.V. stations.

The pledge helps educate and motivate one to contribute to a better world.
Think of the impact if even a significant minority of the one million
college graduates each year signed and carried out the Pledge.

PLEASE KEEP US INFORMED OF ANY PLEDGE EFFORTS YOU UNDERTAKE, AS WE TRY TO
MONITOR WHAT IS HAPPENING, AND PROVIDE PERIODIC UPDATES ON THE NATIONAL
EFFORT. Contact  [log in to unmask] for
information/questions/comments; or write GPA, MC Box 135, Manchester
College, 604 E. College Ave., North Manchester, IN  46962. The Campaign
also has a web site, at
http://www.manchester.edu/academic/programs/departments/peace_studies/files/gpa.html

-----==================================================================================================

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 18 Sep 2002 15:02:28 EDT
From:    "Dale T. Griffee" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Assessment Materials

Dear Shana, I notice this is the second time you have posted this request for
information, so I conclude that maybe you are not getting as much data as you
want. I am interested in evaluation and assessment, but i am just getting
into the field of developmental educationand, and I do not have good
connections with the local learning centers. I teach basic writing part-time
for a junior college on the campus of the local four-year research institute,
and am about half way through an on-line course MA in Dev Ed from
National-Louis University.

Given those restrictions, I wonder how I could help you, and I have this
idea. You make a (kind of) questionnaire. You list the assessments you have
located so far along with some kind of Likert scale rating system as for
example:

Assessment  Donâ€t use, not satisfactory to very satisfactory
instrument X

That way I (and maybe others) could appraoch the learning centers on the
campus of the local universities and quickly interview the director by means
of your questionnaire check-list. If the respondent says they donâ€t like
instrument X, then I could ask why. If they say they like instrument X, I
could also ask why, and either way I could send you the data. You could also
include a question about any instruments they use not on your list. That way
you would have documented proof of the instrument in use plus evidence of
what users thought were the strengths and weaknesses plus any additional
instruments. And I who have no real connection with any LC or knowledge of
the current assessments instruments could still gather the data that would
help you move your dissertation along.

What do you think?

Dale Griffee

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 18 Sep 2002 13:25:17 -0600
From:    miguel Acosta <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Assessment Materials

I've noticed an increase in the number of publications focusing on assessment.  You might want to check with Jossey-Bass to send their most recent listings.

Miguel Angel Acosta

--On Wednesday, September 18, 2002 3:02 PM +0000 "Dale T. Griffee" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Dear Shana, I notice this is the second time you have posted this request
> for information, so I conclude that maybe you are not getting as much
> data as you want. I am interested in evaluation and assessment, but i am
> just getting into the field of developmental educationand, and I do not
> have good connections with the local learning centers. I teach basic
> writing part-time for a junior college on the campus of the local
> four-year research institute, and am about half way through an on-line
> course MA in Dev Ed from National-Louis University.
>
> Given those restrictions, I wonder how I could help you, and I have this
> idea. You make a (kind of) questionnaire. You list the assessments you
> have located so far along with some kind of Likert scale rating system as
> for example:
>
> Assessment  Donâ??t use, not satisfactory to very satisfactory
> instrument X
>
> That way I (and maybe others) could appraoch the learning centers on the
> campus of the local universities and quickly interview the director by
> means of your questionnaire check-list. If the respondent says they
> donâ??t like instrument X, then I could ask why. If they say they like
> instrument X, I could also ask why, and either way I could send you the
> data. You could also include a question about any instruments they use
> not on your list. That way you would have documented proof of the
> instrument in use plus evidence of what users thought were the strengths
> and weaknesses plus any additional instruments. And I who have no real
> connection with any LC or knowledge of the current assessments
> instruments could still gather the data that would help you move your
> dissertation along.
>
> What do you think?
>
> Dale Griffee
>
> To Unsubscribe,
> send a message to [log in to unmask]
> In body type: SIGNOFF LRNASST.

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 18 Sep 2002 13:55:18 -0700
From:    bill hill <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Online students

Liz,

You might look at the lit. for performance
improvement... it's related to instructional design
(my area) and human resources.

Generally, the perfomance improvement specialists hold
that a person's performance (and instruction) is tied
to environment, incentive, motivation, tools, etc.
Here's their model:
http://ispi.org/services/whatshptmodel.htm

My opinion: much of the performance improvement
question is covered in the assessment phase of
instructional design, like the one detailed in this
book:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0787951595/qid=1032381457/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-2114502-6656039?v=glance&s=books

Bill Hill
Coordinator
Instructional Design Center
Seattle University
[log in to unmask]

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End of LRNASST Digest - 17 Sep 2002 to 18 Sep 2002 (#2002-199)
**************************************************************