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Interesting question...

I remember discussing this in my Org Comm classes [Prof. Vince Farace].  For
human networks the numbers 50% through 80% were used -- for every
re-transmission of a message only 50-80% of the original content is retained.
Of course one re-transmission may retain 90% while the next one may retain only
20% depending on the particular node/link in the path.

For A-->B-->C-->D ...
at 80%: D only gets about 1/2 of the original content
at 50%: D only gets 1/8 of the original content!

And what about multiple paths from A to D that distort the original message differently?

Makes 6 degree of separation quite a large world, eh?

Valdis

P.S. With computers/routers as nodes this is usually not a problem -- most of
the transmission protocols have built-in error checking that makes sure what is
being received is what was originally sent.




Marko Pahor wrote:
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.sfu.ca/~insna/  *****
>
> Dear SocNet-ers,
>
> I have a question. I'm trying to think of a network of contacts that is
> not an actual information exchange network in terms of a such. But I'm
> afraid that I'll have a lot of noise. By noise I mean that when A gets
> information from B and B gets information from C (A and C are not
> connected), the information A gets from C (through B) will not be
> correct. Think for example of gossip. Someone cuts his finger and after
> a couple of steps the story will be that he cut off his hand - this is
> what I mean by noise.
>
> Does anyone know about some research on noise in the information
> exchange network? Maybe it's called differently, as I couldn't get
> anything under this search (I got some information exchange network
> concerning noise, noise emitters and stuff like that).
>
> Thank you for your help.
>
> Marko Pahor
>
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