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Fellow Birders:
Thanks for the opinions. It occured to me, on the drive home that another
significant Florida birding hot-spot, overlooked in yesterdays Fort
Lauderdale Sun Sentinal article, were the Dry Tortugas and Key West.

My first, and only, Dry Totugas trip was about 10 years ago, was bountiful
and I saw what I was hoping for. I have birded down to Key West several times
since then, during migratory periods, and the bird diversity in the lower
keys can be fabulous. Before I had been to the Totugas I actually would have
considered that destination above Everglades NP. But the Everglades are far
more accesable, and for a first timer, the ticking can be equal to the
Tortugas, minus the sea-sickness. The Tortugas are kind of like Nome, Alaska.
I lived and worked in Alaska, but I only got to Nome, for birding once,
because it was so expensive.

On a siting note: I did see several Gannets and a single Red-throated Loon
from my office window in the center of Delray Beach. I know the Red-throated
Loon is a casual to uncommon visitor to our coast in winter, but this bird
had the very distinctive white face and neck of the Red-throated in
non-breeding plumage. I actually got a scope on the bird, but new what it was
as I first observed it flying N just past the first reef line. I watched it
for about 1 minute.
Matt Reid
Coral Springs, Fl

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