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Gary Probst replied:
If you compare the textbooks used 40 and 50 years ago to today's college
textbooks, you will see a big difference.  The textbooks today cover more
material at a more difficult level.

Also, what I find interesting is many of the textbooks used at community
colleges on the freshman level are used in colleges and universities at a
higher level.  For example, Modern Management by Samuel C. Certo.  Since
these textbooks come with test banks, students in different institutions
probably are taking the same tests.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Clack" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, November 13, 2002 5:28 AM
Subject: Re: Grade Inflation


> Has anyone done any research on what students needed to do (amount of
work,
> nature to work) to earn and A, B, or C  20 years ago compared to today?
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Gene Kerstiens" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Friday, November 08, 2002 2:35 PM
> Subject: Grade Inflation
>
>
> > --part1_14a.171b0d53.2afd6bfe_boundary
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
> > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> >
> > Through the years I've listened to colleagues and read commentators who
> > become operatic about grade inflation and evangelistic about
> "reestablishing
> > standards."  But my half-century experience with college students would
> seem
> > to parallel Clifford Adelman's findings:  today's students are different
> from
> > earlier learners but no worse; they are just as bad.  Here's an excerpt
> from
> > "Dangerous Myths of Grade Inflation," Chronicle Review, 11/8/02.
> >
> > "To get a more accurate picture of whether grades have changed over the
> > years, one needs to look at official student transcripts. Clifford
> Adelman, a
> > senior research analyst with the U.S. Department of Education, did just
> that,
> > reviewing transcripts from more than 3,000 institutions and reporting
his
> > results in 1995. His finding: "Contrary to the widespread lamentations,
> > grades actually declined slightly in the last two decades." Moreover, a
> > report released just this year by the National Center for Education
> > Statistics revealed that fully 33.5 percent of American undergraduates
had
> a
> > grade-point average of C or below in 1999-2000, a number that ought to
> quiet
> > "all the furor over grade inflation," according to a spokesperson for
the
> > Association of American Colleges and Universities. (A review of other
> > research suggests a comparable lack of support for claims of grade
> inflation
> > at the high-school level.)"
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Gene Kerstiens
> > Andragogy Associates
> > 3434 W. 227 Place
> > Torrance, CA 90505-2632
> > (310) 326-5819
> > www.sbi4windows.com
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --part1_14a.171b0d53.2afd6bfe_boundary
> > Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
> > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> >
> > <HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF"
> FACE="Arial" LANG="0">Through the years I've listened to colleagues and
read
> commentators who become operatic about grade inflation and evangelistic
> about "reestablishing standards."&nbsp; But my half-century experience
with
> college students would seem to parallel Clifford Adelman's findings:&nbsp;
> today's students <I>are </I>different from earlier learners but no worse;
> they are just as bad.&nbsp; Here's an excerpt from "Dangerous Myths of
Grade
> Inflation," <I>Chronicle Review</I>, 11/8/02.<BR>
> > <BR>
> > "To get a more accurate picture of whether grades have changed over the
> years, one needs to look at official student transcripts. Clifford
Adelman,
> a senior research analyst with the U.S. Department of Education, did just
> that, reviewing transcripts from more than 3,000 institutions and
reporting
> his results in 1995. His finding: "Contrary to the widespread
lamentations,
> grades actually declined slightly in the last two decades." Moreover, a
> report released just this year by the National Center for Education
> Statistics revealed that fully 33.5 percent of American undergraduates had
a
> grade-point average of C or below in 1999-2000, a number that ought to
quiet
> "all the furor over grade inflation," according to a spokesperson for the
> Association of American Colleges and Universities. (A review of other
> research suggests a comparable lack of support for claims of grade
inflation
> at the high-school level.)"<BR>
> > <BR>
> > Regards,<BR>
> > <BR>
> > Gene Kerstiens<BR>
> > Andragogy Associates<BR>
> > 3434 W. 227 Place<BR>
> > Torrance, CA 90505-2632<BR>
> > (310) 326-5819<BR>
> > www.sbi4windows.com<BR>
> > <BR>
> >     <BR>
> >     <BR>
> > <BR>
> > </FONT></HTML>
> > --part1_14a.171b0d53.2afd6bfe_boundary--
> >
> > To Unsubscribe,
> > send a message to [log in to unmask]
> > In body type: SIGNOFF LRNASST.
>
> To Unsubscribe,
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