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INSNA members

Sorry for x-posting.

Especially session 2 is interesting for social network analysts.

For more info, you can contact me. We (Hans, discussant session 2, and I) 
will also be present in Cancun next month.

----
Axel Marx

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen / Faculty of Social Sciences
Departement Sociologie / Department of Sociology
E. Van Evenstraat 2b
3000 Leuven
Belgium

tel: ++32-16-32.31.72
fax: ++32-16-32.33.65
[log in to unmask]
----




>CALL FOR PAPERS
>- to be circulated [NB : this call closes on 1 March 2003] -
>
>Within the framework of the ECPR Conference, Marburg (Germany), 18-21 
>Sept. 2003 :
>
>Section nr. 6 : Methodological Advances in Comparative Research : 
>Concepts, Techniques, Applications
>
>----------------------
>Nine panels :
>
>1. Process Tracing and Analytic Narratives in Comparative Research
>Chair : Jonathon MOSES, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
>Discussant : Erik JONES, Johns Hopkins Bologna Center, Italy
>This panel aims to encourage a discussion about the different approaches 
>and technologies used to develop comparative narratives.  Papers that 
>employ process tracing, event structure analysis (ESA), and so-called 
>analytical narrative approaches will be encouraged. Papers that explicitly 
>engage the methodological discussion will be prioritised.
>
>2. Combining Social Network Analysis and a Comparative Case Approach: 
>Towards Cross-fertilization
>Chair : Axel MARX, K.U. Leuven, Belgium
>Discussant : Hans VERHOEVEN, K.U. Leuven, Belgium
>Social network analysis and theory has recently gained prominence in 
>social scientific research. Many social network analysts use a 
>variable-oriented research approach. This panel will examine the possible 
>contribution of a multiple comparative case approach ('thicker' 
>information, configurational logic, etc.) to network analysis and theory. 
>Papers that integrate network methods and theory with a multiple 
>comparative case design and analysis (e.g. QCA or fs/QCA) will be prioritised.
>
>3. The Potential of Qualitative Methods in “Small N” Situations: Dealing 
>with the Tension between the Number of Cases and In-depth Investigation
>Chair : Algis KRUPAVICIUS, Kaunas U.T., Lithuania
>Discussant : Tor MIDTBO, Univ. Bergen, Norway
>In comparative research, one is often confronted with a tension between 
>the number of cases and the “in-depth” understanding of each individual 
>case. How many cases can be studied in an in-depth manner? What does one 
>mean by “in-depth” investigation? Papers that explicitly treat this 
>tension, from a methodological and/or empirical perspective, will be 
>prioritised.
>
>4. Systematic Qualitative Comparisons in Comparative Research
>Chair : Steffen GANGHOF, MPIfG Köln, Germany
>Discussant : Daniele CARAMANI, U. of Mannheim, Germany
>This panel focuses on the role of comparison in comparative case study 
>research. Small-N Comparison (and thus control) increases the researcher's 
>leverage on the research question, but only moderately. Research design 
>and case selection are therefore dependent on the kind of (causal) 
>questions asked in qualitative analysis. If the goal is to develop complex 
>explanations for specific puzzles, the role of comparison may be to 
>control for broad background factors; if the goal is to explore a 
>particular causal pattern, comparison may help to isolate this pattern. 
>The panel focuses on this interaction of research questions and research 
>design.
>
>5. QCA (Qualitative Comparative Analysis) in Comparative Research: 
>Applications
>Chair : Benoît RIHOUX, U.C. Louvain, Belgium
>Discussant : Claudius WAGEMANN, EUI, Firenze, Italy
>Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), an approach and technique (and 
>software) developed from the mid-1980’s onwards, is now being increasingly 
>used, particularly in political science. This panel will focus on original 
>QCA applications, in different sub-fields of political science. Papers 
>that explore the range of different uses of QCA (theory testing, typology, 
>description, theory development, hypothesis testing, etc.) and that 
>exploit the full potential of the (fs/)QCA software will be prioritized.
>
>6. Fuzzy sets in Comparative Research: Applications
>Chair : Paul PENNINGS, V.U. Amsterdam, The Netherlands
>Discussant : Charles C. RAGIN, U. of Arizona, USA
>Almost all verbal theory is formulated in terms of set-theoretic relations 
>and almost all social science concepts can be usefully formulated as fuzzy 
>sets. The goal of this panel is to discuss ways in which fuzzy sets can be 
>used to study social and political phenomena as a matter of degree instead 
>of fixed types. Furthermore, the pros and cons of the fuzzy-set logic are 
>discussed since the potential of fuzzy sets can only be materialized when 
>one is aware of
>the main topics that surround the application of this new method.
>
>7. Potential and Limits of QCA (Qualitative Comparative Analysis) and 
>Fuzzy Sets for Comparative Politics: Methodological Issues
>Chair : Gisèle DE MEUR, U.L.Brussels, Belgium
>Discussant : Charles C. RAGIN, U. of Arizona, USA
>What are the respective qualities and limits of the “fuzzy sets” versus 
>the “crisp sets”, i.e. the dichotomous logic of QCA? Is it so that fuzzy 
>sets constitute an “improvement” of QCA ? Or, conversely, does QCA display 
>some distinctive qualities that are not matched by fuzzy sets ? Papers 
>that explicitly compare QCA and fuzzy sets, from a methodological and/or 
>empirical perspective, will be prioritised.
>
>8. The Potential of Statistical Methods in “Small N” Situations: Can 
>“Robust Statistics” help in Comparative Research ?
>Chair : Bruno CAUTRES, I.E.P. Grenoble, France
>Discussant : Dirk BERG-SCHLOSSER (Marburg, Germany)
>Mainstream statistical tools encounter major problems in small N 
>situations. “Robust statistics” corresponds to a broad range of techniques 
>that are intended to treat “small N” situations. What is the potential of 
>these techniques in political science ? Do they bring added value to other 
>techniques, such as QCA and Fuzzy sets (among others) ? Papers that 
>explicitly discuss specific robust statistics techniques (such as repeated 
>sampling in regression analysis, loglinear methods, etc.) and applications 
>to actual research data will be prioritised.
>
>9. Potential and Limits of Time-series Cross-section Analysis in 
>Comparative Research
>Chair : Bernhard KITTEL, GSSS, University of Bremen, Germany
>Discussant : Steffen GANGHOF, MPIfG Köln, Germany
>The panel is intended to critically examine the usefulness of panel data 
>methods for comparative research designs and to explore promising areas of 
>application. In particular, papers exploiting more recent advances in 
>panel econometrics  e.g., dynamic panel methods, error correction models 
>and cointegration  but reflecting their application to the comparative 
>perspective in political science are encouraged.
>---------------------------------------
>
>NB :
>- this call for papers closes on 1 March 2003
>- paper proposals : to be sent to the corresponding panel chairs (e-mail 
>addresses : see 
>http://www.essex.ac.uk/ecpr/general_conference/show_section.asp?secID=6 ; 
>click on the corresponding panel title)
>- conference registration begins on 15 January 2003
>
>-------------
>
>The conference will also host a Roundtable on "Controversies and Advances 
>in Comparative Methodology" , featuring (among others) : Prof. Dirk 
>BERG-SCHLOSSER, University of Marburg; Prof. Bruno CAUTRÈS, University of 
>Grenoble; Prof. David COLLIER, University of California, Berkeley; Prof. 
>Charles RAGIN, University of Arizona.
>
>
>--------------
>
>For comprehensive information and practical guidelines, pls go to :
>
>- ECPR Marburg Conference page : 
>http://www.essex.ac.uk/ecpr/general_conference/index.htm
>- Section nr. 6 page : 
>http://www.essex.ac.uk/ecpr/general_conference/show_section.asp?secID=6
>
>Some information is also available on the International small N resource 
>site ("news" section) : http://smalln.spri.ucl.ac.be/